Home Page News Opinion Foreign Policy Politics Policy Legislation Lobbying Hill Life & People Hill Climbers Heard On The Hill Calendar Archives Classifieds
Hill Times Events Hill Times Books Hill Times Careers The Wire Report The Lobby Monitor Parliament Now
Subscribe Free Trial Reuse & Permissions Advertising
Log In
In the days before cannabis legalization, Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Minister Bill Blair told reporters Canada's regulated market will do a 'much better job protecting our kids' and begin an 'important process' offering consumers 'a responsible and healthier choice.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Cannabis confusion ‘nature of the beast’ as 95-year ban ends, but it’s ‘time to pull the trigger,’ say experts, politicos

The Liberals are spending $100-million over six years on public awareness campaigns, which most insiders say are a good start but opposition MPs slam as a ‘failure.’

Pot lobbying to remain high in wake of legalization, insiders say

There’s likely to be a lot of ‘jockeying’ from interested groups, as rules around non-smokeable products are still undecided.

Elections debate commissioner coming before 2019 election, but not through legislation: Minister Gould

Time has run out for legislation to set up the promised independent commissioner to run leaders’ debates, says Karina Gould, who will rely on recommendations made by a House committee in the spring.

Politics This Morning

Get the latest news from The Hill Times

Politics This Morning


Your email has been added. An email has been sent to your address, please click the link inside of it to confirm your subscription.

Labyrinthine federal procurement system too complex: watchdog

News|By Emily Haws
Long processes, problematic procurement tools, and security clearances were noted as the top complaints of both federal officials and suppliers in the last year.

Public service staffing survey results show management ‘out of touch,’ says NDP MP Daniel Blaikie

News|By Emily Haws
The ‘perception versus the reality seems to be a little out of whack,’ says Public Service Commission president Patrick Borbey.

Steel town MPs, industry reps, cool to idea of quota-for-tariff exemption for U.S. metal duties

News|By Jolson Lim
Algoma Steel told the House International Trade Committee that it would support certain quotas in exchange for a duty exemption, something U.S. president Donald Trump hinted as a solution to ending the trade spat.

Former Hill staffer Wernick wants MPs to sign pledge to bring about ‘a long-term culture change’ on the Hill

News|By Abbas Rana
MPs offer mixed reaction to Paul Wernick’s ideas and are expressing concerns that following some elements of the pledge would violate the privacy of their staff.

Experts, critics urge feds to ‘ratchet up’ climate change efforts, seize the political leadership, after ‘landmark’ UN report

‘Staying the course when it’s the wrong course is not leadership,’ said Green Party Leader Elizabeth May of the Liberal government’s response to a recent UN report on the impacts of climate change.

Great expectations, and racism, but immense pride and learning: Asian-Canadian MPs share their experiences

News|By Jolson Lim
For some Asian-Canadian MPs, being elected to Ottawa comes with expectations. But they say the job brings them much pride and an opportunity to learn about their community.

Former Brampton Conservative MP Seeback not ruling out nomination run in Dufferin-Caledon, blasting two other official candidates for being ‘disrespectful’ for challenging Conservative MP Tilson

News|By Abbas Rana
Former Brampton Conservative MP Kyle Seeback says he will make a decision about running in Dufferin-Caledon after the Oct. 22 municipal election.
In the days before cannabis legalization, Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Minister Bill Blair told reporters Canada's regulated market will do a 'much better job protecting our kids' and begin an 'important process' offering consumers 'a responsible and healthier choice.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Cannabis confusion ‘nature of the beast’ as 95-year ban ends, but it’s ‘time to pull the trigger,’ say experts, politicos

The Liberals are spending $100-million over six years on public awareness campaigns, which most insiders say are a good start but opposition MPs slam as a ‘failure.’

On populism, Harper buys into right wing’s old ruse

Opinion|By Les Whittington
He says he’s more scared of leftist populists than ones like Donald Trump. But Stephen Harper’s not seeing his kind of trickle-down economics is partly what’s breeding populism.

First Man and the power of perspective

Opinion|By Lisa Van Dusen
Maybe vicarious space travel is the perfect escape from our current planetary unpleasantness.

Political staffers have it tough. I know. I employ them

With little job security and lacking independent dispute-resolution mechanisms, MPs’ and ministers’ staff are vulnerable.

Brison’s ingenious selling of Bill C-58 to the Senate      

Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Brison's crowning sales pitch was reserved for Bill C-58's proposal to legalize a new release system that sets some records aside that government would selectively disclose, like minister's mandate letters and expenses.

Liberals turn sights on social media giants in bid to boost elections bill

The government has proposed more than 60 changes to Bill C-76, which NDP critic Nathan Cullen says points to a ‘flawed’ bill. There are a whopping 340 suggested changes altogether, to be debated next week.

Bowing to pressure, feds urge Senate to change access to information bill

The government is responding to critics who want to make the information commissioner’s order-making powers immediate, and scrap a requirement that requesters detail the time period, subject, and type of document.

Mali mission is more modern colonialism than altruism

Opinion|By Scott Taylor
There are political and domestic economic reasons for Canada to get its hands dirty in an ongoing UN mission.

Promoting learning abroad the missing ‘piece of the puzzle’ for Canadian government, say stakeholders

News|By Neil Moss
The Canadian government has focused on attracting international students to Canada, now it has to do the same for encouraging Canadian students to study abroad, says a former Canadian International Development Agency

The other shoe: UN report on climate change doesn’t talk about the feedbacks, refugees, mass death

Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
If you don’t go into the feedbacks, then you can’t talk about runaway warming, and going to 4, 5 or 6 degrees C higher average global temperature, and hundreds of millions or billions of deaths, writes Gywnne Dyer.

Canada has ‘straightforward’ path to ratify USMCA, but timeline reliant on unpredictable Americans

Some trade experts think Canada will ratify the trilateral agreement before the 2019 election, while one warned against rushing through legislation, with the U.S. timeline up in the air.

I have no ‘mechanisms of leverage over anybody’: Inside the Senate’s Government Representative Office

With a combined $1.68-million budget, the three-Senator Government Representative Office is tasked with carrying the government’s flag in a sea of Upper Chamber Independents.

New business coalition makes late-stage play in NAFTA talks to keep trade free

News|By Beatrice Paez
The formation of the Coalition to Keep Trade Free comes as Canada is facing an Oct. 1 deadline to sign onto the agreement struck between Mexico and the U.S.

Yan Plante back among Conservative staff on the Hill

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Plus, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna and Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains recently hired new aides.

The Washington Post comes north of the border

Feature|By Neil Moss
Also, new Canadians become citizens in the company of clouds, and call for submissions announced for the Donner Prize.

Cotter named director of communications to new Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Minister Blair

Science Minister Kirsty Duncan recently bade farewell to her press secretary, Ann Marie Paquet.

“House decorum has come into focus once again. Does it need to be addressed? What can be done?”

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert

Fresh off the campaign trail in New Brunswick, Guy Gallant now comms director to heritage minister

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Plus, there are a flurry of staff changes in the LRB, including former Ontario Liberal staffer Kevin Den Heijer’s addition as special assistant for Ontario regional affairs.

Thanksgiving turkey with a side of partisan rancour?

Feature|By Neil Moss
Also, a new 'controversial' book offers a blueprint to radically change Canadian health care, and an interprovincial trade conference will be hosted in Ottawa.

Duncan says federal government is looking at new ways to support Canadian researchers abroad

News|By Jolson Lim
Science Minister Kirsty Duncan discusses her office's remaining priorities before the next election, support for graduate students and Canadians researching abroad, and improving equality and diversity in science.

Canada needs IP incentives to be globally competitive

Opinion|By Adam Kingsley
Incentives for companies to protect intellectual property, and bring innovations to market, are critical to helping Canada realize its competitive potential.

How the rail industry’s culture of innovation benefits Canada

Opinion|By Marc Brazeau
All Canadians benefit from a rail network that is efficient, sustainable and, most importantly, safe.

Senate to decide if environmental protection is legitimate in the Anthropocene

Opinion|By Natalija Vojno
Times are changing and our laws need to change. It's more important than ever to strengthen the ability of our institutions to respond to present and future threats to the very ecosystems that sustain our economy.

Electricity lineworkers: modern day ‘heroes’

Opinion|By Sergio Marchi
The federal government should legislate an annual National Lineworker Appreciation Day, says Sergio Marchi.

Politics This Morning: Andrew Scheer gets preserved in paint; Liberals to announce pot pardons

Simply imposing the tax won’t cut it. Offering incentives, innovations, and transparency just might.
In light of the public outcry surrounding child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic’s transfer to an Aboriginal healing lodge, it’s worth shining a light on how our rehabilitation system is designed to work.
As I watched my wife’s life slowly fade away, it seemed so odd to me the way people were working themselves up into an emotional frenzy over things that more than likely wouldn’t impact their personal lives.
Opinion|Susan Riley
The federal Liberals, self-described champions of climate action, are approving giant fossil fuel projects at breakneck pace, even compared to their predecessors, the oil-friendly Harper Conservatives.
Opinion|Sheila Copps
When future generations hold exclusive ownership of ancestral cultural symbols, dissemination becomes limited and survival is threatened. The opportunity to grow a culture is dependent on cross-pollination and evolution.
Stephen Harper is a traditional conservative, standing on a shrinking patch of political real estate, and he’s responding to the crisis like traditional conservatives too often do: by suggesting that the likes of Trump can somehow be accommodated.
The Hill Times in print

Politics This Morning

Get the latest news from The Hill Times

Politics This Morning


Your email has been added. An email has been sent to your address, please click the link inside of it to confirm your subscription.

Policy director changes for Wilkinson, Wilson-Raybould

Two new political aides recently joined Public Services and Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough’s office.

Minister Champagne nabs press secretary from Minister Carr

Plus, Marie-Pascale Des Rosiers has left the Prime Minister’s Office to take over as communications director to Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson.
Feature|Neil Moss

Daughters of the Vote to return to Parliament Hill in 2019

Also, a new book on the Lac-Mégantic rail disaster reveals it could happen again, and the Supreme Court enters the 1990s.
Feature|Neil Moss

A Liberal and a Tory join swelling list of MPs sitting out next election

Also, a former GG and a Hill Times columnist have new books out this month, and the expelled Canadian Saudi ambassador will speak about the Middle East at an Ottawa event.
Feature|Emily Haws

Diana Ross helps raise more than $780,000 at this year’s glitzy NAC Gala

Sparkles and satin were on display as guests dressed in their best to see the Motown Queen perform Oct. 3.
Feature|Emily Haws

Hillites say farewell to The Globe’s Laura Stone

About 30 people stopped by Brixton's pub on Sept. 26 to wish Laura Stone well as she heads to Toronto to cover Ontario's provincial legislature.

Increased air travel key to closer relations between Qatar, Canada: envoy

No progress has been made since a January announcement of a rejigged air transport agreement between Qatar and Canada, says Saoud Abdulla Zaid Al-Mahmoud.

Greater need for Canada, Denmark to lead on world stage, new envoy says

Thomas Winkler says now more than ever there's a need for smaller countries with strong democratic values to 'punch above' their weight and 'hold the beacon high' on the international stage.

MP Matt Jeneroux to host STEM Day on the Hill Oct. 17

Wednesday, October 17th, 2018
Matt Jeneroux is the former Conservative critic for innovation, science, and economic development and the MP for Edmonton Riverbend, Alta. Photograph courtesy of the office of Matt Jeneroux
It's a busy time of year on the Hill, with lobby days in full swing as the House sits for the next few weeks until Remembrance Day. 

Beauce MP Maxime Bernier files the papers registering the People's Party of Canada at Elections Canada's headquarters Wednesday morning. If his party is granted status, Mr. Bernier said he plans to field candidates in all 338 ridings in the next election.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Annual Features
Hill Times Slideshows
Your group subscription includes premium access to Politics This Morning briefing.