Friday, June 14, 2024
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Books & Big Ideas

FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | June 10, 2024
Hot tickets: Stephen Maher's The Prince: The Turbulent Reign of Justin Trudeau, and Paul Wells' Justin Trudeau on the Ropes are must-reads this spring. Images courtesy of Simon & Schuster, Sutherland House, and The Hill Times photographs by Jake Wright
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | June 10, 2024
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | June 10, 2024
Hot tickets: Stephen Maher's The Prince: The Turbulent Reign of Justin Trudeau, and Paul Wells' Justin Trudeau on the Ropes are must-reads this spring. Images courtesy of Simon & Schuster, Sutherland House, and The Hill Times photographs by Jake Wright
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | May 27, 2024
Justin Trudeau: 'The contrast between the vision that Mr. Poilievre is putting forward and what we continue to work for every single day couldn't be clearer, couldn't be crisper. As a competitor, as a leader, as someone committed to this country, being there for that conversation with Canadians touches me at the ore of what I feel my purpose is.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | May 27, 2024
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | May 27, 2024
Justin Trudeau: 'The contrast between the vision that Mr. Poilievre is putting forward and what we continue to work for every single day couldn't be clearer, couldn't be crisper. As a competitor, as a leader, as someone committed to this country, being there for that conversation with Canadians touches me at the ore of what I feel my purpose is.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Who Owns Outer Space? draws attention to the many risks that are linked to the deployment of very large numbers of new satellites, and the growing rivalries among leading spacefaring nations and corporations, writes the Donner Prize Foundation. Image courtesy of Cambridge University Press
Who Owns Outer Space? draws attention to the many risks that are linked to the deployment of very large numbers of new satellites, and the growing rivalries among leading spacefaring nations and corporations, writes the Donner Prize Foundation. Image courtesy of Cambridge University Press
FeatureBY KENT ROACH | April 24, 2024
The uncertainty surrounding the full implementation of LaForme/Westmoreland Traore report is one reason why I agreed to write this book. New legislation to establish a new commission has the potential to be the most important law reform with respect to wrongful convictions in a generation, writes Kent Roach. Book cover courtesy of Simon & Schuster, 2023
FeatureBY KENT ROACH | April 24, 2024
FeatureBY KENT ROACH | April 24, 2024
The uncertainty surrounding the full implementation of LaForme/Westmoreland Traore report is one reason why I agreed to write this book. New legislation to establish a new commission has the potential to be the most important law reform with respect to wrongful convictions in a generation, writes Kent Roach. Book cover courtesy of Simon & Schuster, 2023
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | April 24, 2024
Jane Philpott, the former federal health minister and current dean of health sciences at Queen's University, spoke to The Hill Times about how to fix Canada's ailing family health systems. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | April 24, 2024
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | April 24, 2024
Jane Philpott, the former federal health minister and current dean of health sciences at Queen's University, spoke to The Hill Times about how to fix Canada's ailing family health systems. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Pandemic Panic will be very relevant to policymakers in that it provides a critical analysis of past actions and their implications, offering lessons that can inform future crisis response and policy development, writes the Donner Prize Foundation. Book cover image courtesy of Optimum Publishing International
Pandemic Panic will be very relevant to policymakers in that it provides a critical analysis of past actions and their implications, offering lessons that can inform future crisis response and policy development, writes the Donner Prize Foundation. Book cover image courtesy of Optimum Publishing International
Opinion | BY ARTHUR MILNES | October 23, 2023
John Diefenbaker was prime minister from 1957-1963, followed by Lester B. Pearson from 1963-1968. 'If Pearson walked with ease in the halls of power, Diefenbaker connected with the farmers and small-town merchants and others left outside the inner circle,' writes John Ibbitson in his new book. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY ARTHUR MILNES | October 23, 2023
Opinion | BY ARTHUR MILNES | October 23, 2023
John Diefenbaker was prime minister from 1957-1963, followed by Lester B. Pearson from 1963-1968. 'If Pearson walked with ease in the halls of power, Diefenbaker connected with the farmers and small-town merchants and others left outside the inner circle,' writes John Ibbitson in his new book. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY JIM CRESKEY | October 16, 2023
Keep Hope Alive: Essays for a War-Free World by Doug Roche, published 2023. Cover design by Khalid Yaqub
Opinion | BY JIM CRESKEY | October 16, 2023
Opinion | BY JIM CRESKEY | October 16, 2023
Keep Hope Alive: Essays for a War-Free World by Doug Roche, published 2023. Cover design by Khalid Yaqub
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | September 18, 2023
Roy MacGregor: 'There have, over that half-century of journalism, been blown jet engines, threatening weapons at Oka, a snowstorm on James Bay that forced us to take shelter for three days on a barren island, physical threats from unhappy athletes—and more fun than I ever should have imagined.' Photograph courtesy of Random House Canada/Fred Lum
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | September 18, 2023
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | September 18, 2023
Roy MacGregor: 'There have, over that half-century of journalism, been blown jet engines, threatening weapons at Oka, a snowstorm on James Bay that forced us to take shelter for three days on a barren island, physical threats from unhappy athletes—and more fun than I ever should have imagined.' Photograph courtesy of Random House Canada/Fred Lum
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 10, 2023
Image courtesy of Allen Lane Canada
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 10, 2023
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 10, 2023
Image courtesy of Allen Lane Canada
FeatureBY DALE EISLER | May 8, 2023
Dale Eisler: 'I wrote the book to understand the political transformation of Saskatchewan and why it happened, which I believe is one of the more interesting stories in Canadian politics.' Images courtesy of the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY DALE EISLER | May 8, 2023
FeatureBY DALE EISLER | May 8, 2023
Dale Eisler: 'I wrote the book to understand the political transformation of Saskatchewan and why it happened, which I believe is one of the more interesting stories in Canadian politics.' Images courtesy of the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY JOSH O’KANE | May 8, 2023
Josh O'Kane, author of Sideways: The City Google Couldn't Buy: 'Digital giants have spent much of the past 15 years trying to expand their dominance into the physical world, and governments the world over are woefully underprepared for grappling with what this means for their citizens.' Images courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada
FeatureBY JOSH O’KANE | May 8, 2023
FeatureBY JOSH O’KANE | May 8, 2023
Josh O'Kane, author of Sideways: The City Google Couldn't Buy: 'Digital giants have spent much of the past 15 years trying to expand their dominance into the physical world, and governments the world over are woefully underprepared for grappling with what this means for their citizens.' Images courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada
FeatureBY NORMA DUNNING | May 8, 2023
Author Norma Dunning, on why she wrote Kinauvit?: What's Your Name? The Eskimo Disc System and a Daughter's Search fro her Grandmother: 'I wrote Kinauvit? to inform all of Canada and beyond. We, the Inuit, we are still here and we have always been more than a number.' Image courtesy of Douglas and McIntyre
FeatureBY NORMA DUNNING | May 8, 2023
FeatureBY NORMA DUNNING | May 8, 2023
Author Norma Dunning, on why she wrote Kinauvit?: What's Your Name? The Eskimo Disc System and a Daughter's Search fro her Grandmother: 'I wrote Kinauvit? to inform all of Canada and beyond. We, the Inuit, we are still here and we have always been more than a number.' Image courtesy of Douglas and McIntyre
Authors Stobo Sniderman, left, and Douglas Sanderson (Amo Binashii) on why they wrote the book: 'Valley of the Birdtail began as a story about the unfair and unequal education on Indian reserves. To tell that story, we found that we had to go back to the beginning, and the book became a story about Canada. In the end, we found a measure of hope.' Image courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers
Authors Stobo Sniderman, left, and Douglas Sanderson (Amo Binashii) on why they wrote the book: 'Valley of the Birdtail began as a story about the unfair and unequal education on Indian reserves. To tell that story, we found that we had to go back to the beginning, and the book became a story about Canada. In the end, we found a measure of hope.' Image courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers
FeatureBY CHRIS TURNER | May 8, 2023
Author Chris Turner, who has been covering the climate change crisis for decades, says it's the defining issue of this century, 'and solving it is the most important and one of the most daunting challenges humanity has ever faced.' Images courtesy of Random House Canada
FeatureBY CHRIS TURNER | May 8, 2023
FeatureBY CHRIS TURNER | May 8, 2023
Author Chris Turner, who has been covering the climate change crisis for decades, says it's the defining issue of this century, 'and solving it is the most important and one of the most daunting challenges humanity has ever faced.' Images courtesy of Random House Canada
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | May 8, 2023
Guests, pictured May 9, 2018, on the terrace of the Chateau Laurier Hotel at that year's Politics and the Pen gala fundraiser. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | May 8, 2023
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | May 8, 2023
Guests, pictured May 9, 2018, on the terrace of the Chateau Laurier Hotel at that year's Politics and the Pen gala fundraiser. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | February 6, 2023
Flavio Volpe lobbies and advocates on behalf of Canada's autoparts manufacturers. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | February 6, 2023
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | February 6, 2023
Flavio Volpe lobbies and advocates on behalf of Canada's autoparts manufacturers. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
Then-U.S. president Donald Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 8, 2018, at the G7 meeting in Quebec. Twitter has assumed a centrality of place in the political theatre, becoming over the span of a few short years, the main stage on which the cut and thrust of partisan duelling plays out. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
Then-U.S. president Donald Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 8, 2018, at the G7 meeting in Quebec. Twitter has assumed a centrality of place in the political theatre, becoming over the span of a few short years, the main stage on which the cut and thrust of partisan duelling plays out. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
John Turner, pictured on the Hill back in the 1990s, was first elected to the House in 1962. He practised politics differently, as author Steve Paikin illustrates. Politics for Turner was defined by a mutual respect between partisans which he demonstrated until the day he died in 2020, writes Arthur Milnes. The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
John Turner, pictured on the Hill back in the 1990s, was first elected to the House in 1962. He practised politics differently, as author Steve Paikin illustrates. Politics for Turner was defined by a mutual respect between partisans which he demonstrated until the day he died in 2020, writes Arthur Milnes. The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
Journalist Elamin Abdelmahmoud says reception of Son of Elsewhere: A Memoir in Pieces has continued to shape his understanding of identity and 'allow for a bit more space of self-forgiveness.' Kyla Zanardi photograph courtesy of McClelland & Stewart
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
Journalist Elamin Abdelmahmoud says reception of Son of Elsewhere: A Memoir in Pieces has continued to shape his understanding of identity and 'allow for a bit more space of self-forgiveness.' Kyla Zanardi photograph courtesy of McClelland & Stewart
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Then-NDP MP Peggy Nash, pictured in 2012 at a CPAC party in the West Block courtyard, with Peter Van Dusen, left, and then-Liberal MP John McCallum, right. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Then-NDP MP Peggy Nash, pictured in 2012 at a CPAC party in the West Block courtyard, with Peter Van Dusen, left, and then-Liberal MP John McCallum, right. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Elizabeth May. Authors Bill Cross, Scott Pruysers, and Rob Currie-Wood tackle the core question: 'who, or what, is the political party in Canada?' The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Elizabeth May. Authors Bill Cross, Scott Pruysers, and Rob Currie-Wood tackle the core question: 'who, or what, is the political party in Canada?' The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
Michael Wernick served as the clerk of the Privy Council, the top executive in Canada's public service, before his retirement in 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
Michael Wernick served as the clerk of the Privy Council, the top executive in Canada's public service, before his retirement in 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
Dale Eisler is a wise mind. In the first part of his career, he was an influential and widely respected journalist on the Prairies. In the second, he was an influential and widely respected public servant in the nation's capital. Images courtesy of Facebook and the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
Dale Eisler is a wise mind. In the first part of his career, he was an influential and widely respected journalist on the Prairies. In the second, he was an influential and widely respected public servant in the nation's capital. Images courtesy of Facebook and the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
University of Toronto law professor Douglas Sanderson, left, and his former law student and ex-federal staffer Andrew Stobo Sniderman, right, are co-authors of the upcoming book, Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, a White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation. Photographs courtesy of HarperCollins
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
University of Toronto law professor Douglas Sanderson, left, and his former law student and ex-federal staffer Andrew Stobo Sniderman, right, are co-authors of the upcoming book, Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, a White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation. Photographs courtesy of HarperCollins
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
Charlie Angus' eighth book, the very readable Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower, belongs in the category of Canadian history that isn't taught in school but should be, writes Jim Creskey. Image courtesy of House of Anansi Press and The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
Charlie Angus' eighth book, the very readable Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower, belongs in the category of Canadian history that isn't taught in school but should be, writes Jim Creskey. Image courtesy of House of Anansi Press and The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
At the heart of former U.S. president George W. Bush’s May 18 stumble is that fact that he really is a war criminal whose actions resulted in the needless deaths of more than one million Iraqi civilians, writes Scott Taylor. Screenshot courtesy of YouTube/NBC News
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
At the heart of former U.S. president George W. Bush’s May 18 stumble is that fact that he really is a war criminal whose actions resulted in the needless deaths of more than one million Iraqi civilians, writes Scott Taylor. Screenshot courtesy of YouTube/NBC News
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
The Politics and the Pen gala held inside the Fairmont Château Laurier Hotel ballroom in May, 2017. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
The Politics and the Pen gala held inside the Fairmont Château Laurier Hotel ballroom in May, 2017. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Co-author Mike Blanchfield, pictured. 'We wanted to shine the light on an important case of two Canadians who were arrested and imprisoned in China as time was marching on and there seemed little prospect of their being released.' The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
Co-author Mike Blanchfield, pictured. 'We wanted to shine the light on an important case of two Canadians who were arrested and imprisoned in China as time was marching on and there seemed little prospect of their being released.' The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
Stephen Poloz, pictured on May 1, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. 'Failing to meet this challenge is likely to strain many of the foundations we hold dear, placing extraordinary demands on our political leadership. Indeed, the next age of uncertainty will demand longer-term thinking not only by companies and individuals, but by governments, besides.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
Stephen Poloz, pictured on May 1, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. 'Failing to meet this challenge is likely to strain many of the foundations we hold dear, placing extraordinary demands on our political leadership. Indeed, the next age of uncertainty will demand longer-term thinking not only by companies and individuals, but by governments, besides.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel recycled the suggestion for a provincial police service, to which the Jason Kenney government committed only to study further, which is a way of saying they will not act on the proposal. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel recycled the suggestion for a provincial police service, to which the Jason Kenney government committed only to study further, which is a way of saying they will not act on the proposal. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Jody Wilson-Raybould, pictured on Feb. 27, 2019, on the Hill before the House Justice Committee meeting to talk about the SNC-Lavalin affair, about two weeks after she resigned from cabinet. She successfully ran as an Independent in the Oct. 21, 2019, federal election, after she went public with her story and said she was inappropriately pressured by the prime minister and top officials in the PMO to enact a deferred prosecution for SNC-Lavalin. We should be sounding the alarm about the growing power of political parties to act as gatekeepers over who gets a seat in the House of Commons, and about the waning power of individual candidates and MPs, which stems from changes to the Elections Act that took effect in the 1972 federal election, writes Alex Marland. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Jody Wilson-Raybould, pictured on Feb. 27, 2019, on the Hill before the House Justice Committee meeting to talk about the SNC-Lavalin affair, about two weeks after she resigned from cabinet. She successfully ran as an Independent in the Oct. 21, 2019, federal election, after she went public with her story and said she was inappropriately pressured by the prime minister and top officials in the PMO to enact a deferred prosecution for SNC-Lavalin. We should be sounding the alarm about the growing power of political parties to act as gatekeepers over who gets a seat in the House of Commons, and about the waning power of individual candidates and MPs, which stems from changes to the Elections Act that took effect in the 1972 federal election, writes Alex Marland. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Canada should be doing more to speak out against annual events held on Jan. 1 to celebrate the birth of Ukrainian ultra-nationalist Stepan Bandera, and other Nazi collaborators, writes Scott Taylor. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Canada should be doing more to speak out against annual events held on Jan. 1 to celebrate the birth of Ukrainian ultra-nationalist Stepan Bandera, and other Nazi collaborators, writes Scott Taylor. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Not only did the pandemic shut our bookshops and libraries, disrupt our publishing and promotion cycles, and wreak havoc on our supply chain, it brought into crisp focus a glaring irony of this trade, writes Rhea Tregebov. We make something of great value, but painfully little of that value returns to us as income. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Not only did the pandemic shut our bookshops and libraries, disrupt our publishing and promotion cycles, and wreak havoc on our supply chain, it brought into crisp focus a glaring irony of this trade, writes Rhea Tregebov. We make something of great value, but painfully little of that value returns to us as income. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay