Books & Big Ideas

FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
Then-U.S. president Donald Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 8, 2018, at the G7 meeting in Quebec. Twitter has assumed a centrality of place in the political theatre, becoming over the span of a few short years, the main stage on which the cut and thrust of partisan duelling plays out. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | December 19, 2022
Then-U.S. president Donald Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 8, 2018, at the G7 meeting in Quebec. Twitter has assumed a centrality of place in the political theatre, becoming over the span of a few short years, the main stage on which the cut and thrust of partisan duelling plays out. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
John Turner, pictured on the Hill back in the 1990s, was first elected to the House in 1962. He practised politics differently, as author Steve Paikin illustrates. Politics for Turner was defined by a mutual respect between partisans which he demonstrated until the day he died in 2020, writes Arthur Milnes. The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ARTHUR MILNES | December 19, 2022
John Turner, pictured on the Hill back in the 1990s, was first elected to the House in 1962. He practised politics differently, as author Steve Paikin illustrates. Politics for Turner was defined by a mutual respect between partisans which he demonstrated until the day he died in 2020, writes Arthur Milnes. The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
Journalist Elamin Abdelmahmoud says reception of Son of Elsewhere: A Memoir in Pieces has continued to shape his understanding of identity and 'allow for a bit more space of self-forgiveness.' Kyla Zanardi photograph courtesy of McClelland & Stewart
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | December 19, 2022
Journalist Elamin Abdelmahmoud says reception of Son of Elsewhere: A Memoir in Pieces has continued to shape his understanding of identity and 'allow for a bit more space of self-forgiveness.' Kyla Zanardi photograph courtesy of McClelland & Stewart
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Then-NDP MP Peggy Nash, pictured in 2012 at a CPAC party in the West Block courtyard, with Peter Van Dusen, left, and then-Liberal MP John McCallum, right. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Then-NDP MP Peggy Nash, pictured in 2012 at a CPAC party in the West Block courtyard, with Peter Van Dusen, left, and then-Liberal MP John McCallum, right. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
List | BY KATE MALLOY | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Elizabeth May. Authors Bill Cross, Scott Pruysers, and Rob Currie-Wood tackle the core question: 'who, or what, is the political party in Canada?' The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
FeatureBY ALEX MARLAND | December 19, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Elizabeth May. Authors Bill Cross, Scott Pruysers, and Rob Currie-Wood tackle the core question: 'who, or what, is the political party in Canada?' The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
Michael Wernick served as the clerk of the Privy Council, the top executive in Canada's public service, before his retirement in 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
FeatureBY PETER MAZEREEUW | November 28, 2022
Michael Wernick served as the clerk of the Privy Council, the top executive in Canada's public service, before his retirement in 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
Dale Eisler is a wise mind. In the first part of his career, he was an influential and widely respected journalist on the Prairies. In the second, he was an influential and widely respected public servant in the nation's capital. Images courtesy of Facebook and the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER DORNAN | September 7, 2022
Dale Eisler is a wise mind. In the first part of his career, he was an influential and widely respected journalist on the Prairies. In the second, he was an influential and widely respected public servant in the nation's capital. Images courtesy of Facebook and the University of Regina Press
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
University of Toronto law professor Douglas Sanderson, left, and his former law student and ex-federal staffer Andrew Stobo Sniderman, right, are co-authors of the upcoming book, Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, a White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation. Photographs courtesy of HarperCollins
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
FeatureBY LAURA RYCKEWAERT | August 24, 2022
University of Toronto law professor Douglas Sanderson, left, and his former law student and ex-federal staffer Andrew Stobo Sniderman, right, are co-authors of the upcoming book, Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, a White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation. Photographs courtesy of HarperCollins
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
Charlie Angus' eighth book, the very readable Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower, belongs in the category of Canadian history that isn't taught in school but should be, writes Jim Creskey. Image courtesy of House of Anansi Press and The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
FeatureBY JIM CRESKEY | June 13, 2022
Charlie Angus' eighth book, the very readable Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower, belongs in the category of Canadian history that isn't taught in school but should be, writes Jim Creskey. Image courtesy of House of Anansi Press and The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
At the heart of former U.S. president George W. Bush’s May 18 stumble is that fact that he really is a war criminal whose actions resulted in the needless deaths of more than one million Iraqi civilians, writes Scott Taylor. Screenshot courtesy of YouTube/NBC News
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | May 23, 2022
At the heart of former U.S. president George W. Bush’s May 18 stumble is that fact that he really is a war criminal whose actions resulted in the needless deaths of more than one million Iraqi civilians, writes Scott Taylor. Screenshot courtesy of YouTube/NBC News
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
The Politics and the Pen gala held inside the Fairmont Château Laurier Hotel ballroom in May, 2017. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
News | BY STUART BENSON | May 16, 2022
The Politics and the Pen gala held inside the Fairmont Château Laurier Hotel ballroom in May, 2017. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Co-author Mike Blanchfield, pictured. 'We wanted to shine the light on an important case of two Canadians who were arrested and imprisoned in China as time was marching on and there seemed little prospect of their being released.' The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
Co-author Mike Blanchfield, pictured. 'We wanted to shine the light on an important case of two Canadians who were arrested and imprisoned in China as time was marching on and there seemed little prospect of their being released.' The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
Stephen Poloz, pictured on May 1, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. 'Failing to meet this challenge is likely to strain many of the foundations we hold dear, placing extraordinary demands on our political leadership. Indeed, the next age of uncertainty will demand longer-term thinking not only by companies and individuals, but by governments, besides.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
FeatureBY STEPHEN POLOZ | May 16, 2022
Stephen Poloz, pictured on May 1, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. 'Failing to meet this challenge is likely to strain many of the foundations we hold dear, placing extraordinary demands on our political leadership. Indeed, the next age of uncertainty will demand longer-term thinking not only by companies and individuals, but by governments, besides.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel recycled the suggestion for a provincial police service, to which the Jason Kenney government committed only to study further, which is a way of saying they will not act on the proposal. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Opinion | BY NELSON WISEMAN | January 31, 2022
Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel recycled the suggestion for a provincial police service, to which the Jason Kenney government committed only to study further, which is a way of saying they will not act on the proposal. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Jody Wilson-Raybould, pictured on Feb. 27, 2019, on the Hill before the House Justice Committee meeting to talk about the SNC-Lavalin affair, about two weeks after she resigned from cabinet. She successfully ran as an Independent in the Oct. 21, 2019, federal election, after she went public with her story and said she was inappropriately pressured by the prime minister and top officials in the PMO to enact a deferred prosecution for SNC-Lavalin. We should be sounding the alarm about the growing power of political parties to act as gatekeepers over who gets a seat in the House of Commons, and about the waning power of individual candidates and MPs, which stems from changes to the Elections Act that took effect in the 1972 federal election, writes Alex Marland. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Opinion | January 24, 2022
Jody Wilson-Raybould, pictured on Feb. 27, 2019, on the Hill before the House Justice Committee meeting to talk about the SNC-Lavalin affair, about two weeks after she resigned from cabinet. She successfully ran as an Independent in the Oct. 21, 2019, federal election, after she went public with her story and said she was inappropriately pressured by the prime minister and top officials in the PMO to enact a deferred prosecution for SNC-Lavalin. We should be sounding the alarm about the growing power of political parties to act as gatekeepers over who gets a seat in the House of Commons, and about the waning power of individual candidates and MPs, which stems from changes to the Elections Act that took effect in the 1972 federal election, writes Alex Marland. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Canada should be doing more to speak out against annual events held on Jan. 1 to celebrate the birth of Ukrainian ultra-nationalist Stepan Bandera, and other Nazi collaborators, writes Scott Taylor. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | January 17, 2022
Canada should be doing more to speak out against annual events held on Jan. 1 to celebrate the birth of Ukrainian ultra-nationalist Stepan Bandera, and other Nazi collaborators, writes Scott Taylor. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Not only did the pandemic shut our bookshops and libraries, disrupt our publishing and promotion cycles, and wreak havoc on our supply chain, it brought into crisp focus a glaring irony of this trade, writes Rhea Tregebov. We make something of great value, but painfully little of that value returns to us as income. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Opinion | BY RHEA TREGEBOV | November 4, 2021
Not only did the pandemic shut our bookshops and libraries, disrupt our publishing and promotion cycles, and wreak havoc on our supply chain, it brought into crisp focus a glaring irony of this trade, writes Rhea Tregebov. We make something of great value, but painfully little of that value returns to us as income. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | September 22, 2021
Guests, pictured May 9, 2018, at the Politics and the Pen gala at the Château Laurier hotel in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | September 22, 2021
FeatureBY CHRISTOPHER GULY | September 22, 2021
Guests, pictured May 9, 2018, at the Politics and the Pen gala at the Château Laurier hotel in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
News | BY ZAINAB AL-MEHDAR | September 1, 2021
Canadian Politics is Boring is co-hosted by two Halifax-based creatives, Rhys Waters and Jesse Harley, as they try to navigate Canadian politics and the 2021 campaign. Photograph courtesy of Rhys Waters
News | BY ZAINAB AL-MEHDAR | September 1, 2021
News | BY ZAINAB AL-MEHDAR | September 1, 2021
Canadian Politics is Boring is co-hosted by two Halifax-based creatives, Rhys Waters and Jesse Harley, as they try to navigate Canadian politics and the 2021 campaign. Photograph courtesy of Rhys Waters
News | BY NEIL MOSS | July 13, 2021
After the assassination of Haitian president Jovenel Moïse, second from left, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured far left, said that Canada is prepared to offer 'any assistance' that Haiti needs. Liberal MP Emmanuel Dubourg, far right, and Independent Senator Marie-Françoise Mégie say Canada could facilitate a fair election in Haiti. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade and Sam Garcia and photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
News | BY NEIL MOSS | July 13, 2021
News | BY NEIL MOSS | July 13, 2021
After the assassination of Haitian president Jovenel Moïse, second from left, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured far left, said that Canada is prepared to offer 'any assistance' that Haiti needs. Liberal MP Emmanuel Dubourg, far right, and Independent Senator Marie-Françoise Mégie say Canada could facilitate a fair election in Haiti. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade and Sam Garcia and photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
As temperatures increase, ground-level ozone (a component of urban smog) is projected to worsen. Towards the end of the century, the report estimates that ground-level ozone could cause more than a quarter of a million people per decade to be hospitalized or die prematurely, with an annual cost of about $250-billion, write Dylan Clark and Ryan Ness. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
As temperatures increase, ground-level ozone (a component of urban smog) is projected to worsen. Towards the end of the century, the report estimates that ground-level ozone could cause more than a quarter of a million people per decade to be hospitalized or die prematurely, with an annual cost of about $250-billion, write Dylan Clark and Ryan Ness. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY CHUNJIANG AN AND XUELIN TIAN | February 22, 2021
The pandemic offers us a glimpse of what air quality in Canadian cities would look like if the country switched to low-carbon transportation modes, write Chunjiang An and Xuelin Tian. Photograph courtesy of Pexels/Andre Furtado
Opinion | BY CHUNJIANG AN AND XUELIN TIAN | February 22, 2021
Opinion | BY CHUNJIANG AN AND XUELIN TIAN | February 22, 2021
The pandemic offers us a glimpse of what air quality in Canadian cities would look like if the country switched to low-carbon transportation modes, write Chunjiang An and Xuelin Tian. Photograph courtesy of Pexels/Andre Furtado
Opinion | BY MARK WEGIERSKI | January 18, 2021
Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, pictured Oct. 28, 2020, on the Hill. Conservatism today is what might be described as 'forced,' without the luxury for doctrinal experimentation, lackadaisical stances, and its weak commitment to core ideas and programs, writes Mark Wegierski.
Opinion | BY MARK WEGIERSKI | January 18, 2021
Opinion | BY MARK WEGIERSKI | January 18, 2021
Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, pictured Oct. 28, 2020, on the Hill. Conservatism today is what might be described as 'forced,' without the luxury for doctrinal experimentation, lackadaisical stances, and its weak commitment to core ideas and programs, writes Mark Wegierski.
Opinion | BY GWYNNE DYER | January 7, 2021
The obvious way to continue this article would be to point out that Joe Biden won the election, that thanks to the run-off elections in Georgia, the Democrats will control both houses of Congress, and that the joint session of Congress withstood the assault of Trump’s storm-troopers on Jan. 6, 2021, pictured, writes Gwynne Dyer. Screen capture image courtesy ABC NEWS
Opinion | BY GWYNNE DYER | January 7, 2021
Opinion | BY GWYNNE DYER | January 7, 2021
The obvious way to continue this article would be to point out that Joe Biden won the election, that thanks to the run-off elections in Georgia, the Democrats will control both houses of Congress, and that the joint session of Congress withstood the assault of Trump’s storm-troopers on Jan. 6, 2021, pictured, writes Gwynne Dyer. Screen capture image courtesy ABC NEWS
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | December 21, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured speaking at a Liberal caucus meeting in Ottawa on Jan. 23, 2020. Asked why Canadian Parliamentarians so rarely stray from party boundaries, Alex Marland says a big reason that MPs toe the line is that they perceive too many negative consequences for breaking ranks. At a minimum, someone from the leader’s office or whip’s office is going to phone to ask what’s going on, and some caucus members will probably give you an earful. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | December 21, 2020
FeatureBY KATE MALLOY | December 21, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured speaking at a Liberal caucus meeting in Ottawa on Jan. 23, 2020. Asked why Canadian Parliamentarians so rarely stray from party boundaries, Alex Marland says a big reason that MPs toe the line is that they perceive too many negative consequences for breaking ranks. At a minimum, someone from the leader’s office or whip’s office is going to phone to ask what’s going on, and some caucus members will probably give you an earful. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY STEVEN CHAPLIN | November 23, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Nov. 6, 2020, on the Hill. It should also not be forgotten that at any time the opposition can bring a motion of non-confidence in the government, whether the government wants it or not, writes Steven Chaplin. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY STEVEN CHAPLIN | November 23, 2020
Opinion | BY STEVEN CHAPLIN | November 23, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Nov. 6, 2020, on the Hill. It should also not be forgotten that at any time the opposition can bring a motion of non-confidence in the government, whether the government wants it or not, writes Steven Chaplin. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
News | BY MIKE LAPOINTE | October 19, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, and Health Minister Patty Hajdu. A narrow political focus on 'discrete, daily COVID counts' is not enough to address six systemic crises confronting politicians and policy-makers in Canada, according to public policy expert Irvin Studin. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
News | BY MIKE LAPOINTE | October 19, 2020
News | BY MIKE LAPOINTE | October 19, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, and Health Minister Patty Hajdu. A narrow political focus on 'discrete, daily COVID counts' is not enough to address six systemic crises confronting politicians and policy-makers in Canada, according to public policy expert Irvin Studin. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ANDREW CADDELL | October 14, 2020
Information Commissioner Caroline Maynard released her 2019-20 report in late September. She is promising to reduce the number of complaints by requestors, and make the process more transparent. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ANDREW CADDELL | October 14, 2020
Opinion | BY ANDREW CADDELL | October 14, 2020
Information Commissioner Caroline Maynard released her 2019-20 report in late September. She is promising to reduce the number of complaints by requestors, and make the process more transparent. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY AIDAN CHAMANDY | September 21, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on March 16, 2016, announcing Canada's bid for a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. The ultimately unsuccessful campaign for the seat had all the hallmarks of a partisan campaign, something that Adam Chapnick says is detrimental to Canada's success on the UNSC. Prime Minister's Office photo courtesy of Adam Scotti
FeatureBY AIDAN CHAMANDY | September 21, 2020
FeatureBY AIDAN CHAMANDY | September 21, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on March 16, 2016, announcing Canada's bid for a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. The ultimately unsuccessful campaign for the seat had all the hallmarks of a partisan campaign, something that Adam Chapnick says is detrimental to Canada's success on the UNSC. Prime Minister's Office photo courtesy of Adam Scotti
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
Author and former lawyer Harold Johnson’s book Peace and Good Order relays his experience working in the legal system and his conclusion that it can’t bring Indigenous people justice. Photograph courtesy of Calvin Fehr
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
Author and former lawyer Harold Johnson’s book Peace and Good Order relays his experience working in the legal system and his conclusion that it can’t bring Indigenous people justice. Photograph courtesy of Calvin Fehr
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
Law professor Kent Roach offers a close legal analysis of the Gerald Stanley trial as well as the social and political backdrop in his new book Canadian Justice, Indigenous Injustice: The Gerald Stanley and Colten Boushie Case. Photograph courtesy of Kent Roach
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
FeatureBY SAMANTHA WRIGHT ALLEN | September 21, 2020
Law professor Kent Roach offers a close legal analysis of the Gerald Stanley trial as well as the social and political backdrop in his new book Canadian Justice, Indigenous Injustice: The Gerald Stanley and Colten Boushie Case. Photograph courtesy of Kent Roach
FeatureBY BEATRICE PAEZ | September 21, 2020
The fear of hitting a ceiling and spending the rest of her career as a county court judge almost dissuaded Canada's first female chief justice of the Supreme Court Beverley McLachlin from accepting a spot on the bench. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY BEATRICE PAEZ | September 21, 2020
FeatureBY BEATRICE PAEZ | September 21, 2020
The fear of hitting a ceiling and spending the rest of her career as a county court judge almost dissuaded Canada's first female chief justice of the Supreme Court Beverley McLachlin from accepting a spot on the bench. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | July 22, 2020
SS Galizien recruits wait as Kreishauptmann Hoffstetter of SS Galizien enters a Greek Catholic church in Sanok, Poland, in 1943. Wikimedia Commons photograph by Sanisław Potocki
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | July 22, 2020
Opinion | BY SCOTT TAYLOR | July 22, 2020
SS Galizien recruits wait as Kreishauptmann Hoffstetter of SS Galizien enters a Greek Catholic church in Sanok, Poland, in 1943. Wikimedia Commons photograph by Sanisław Potocki
ISG Senator Mary Jane McCallum (Manitoba), pictured in this file photo on the Hill. 'As Parliamentarians, we then have an important role to play in ensuring such institutions, many of which are overseen by the federal government, are improved and accountable when it comes to combatting racism.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade