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Rose LeMay

Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 28, 2022
Participants in the National Truth and Reconciliation Day ceremonies, pictured Sept. 30, 2022, walking down Wellington Street in Ottawa. Belonging to a community must be set by that community with grace, not with an externally-imposed status card, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 28, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 28, 2022
Participants in the National Truth and Reconciliation Day ceremonies, pictured Sept. 30, 2022, walking down Wellington Street in Ottawa. Belonging to a community must be set by that community with grace, not with an externally-imposed status card, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 14, 2022
Reconciliation is not a matter of policy open to the whims of senior bureaucrats nor is it open to conflicting priorities of the party in power. Reconciliation is Canada’s moral obligation, a necessary process that must be accountable to citizens, enforceable through public accountability, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 14, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 14, 2022
Reconciliation is not a matter of policy open to the whims of senior bureaucrats nor is it open to conflicting priorities of the party in power. Reconciliation is Canada’s moral obligation, a necessary process that must be accountable to citizens, enforceable through public accountability, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 31, 2022
Most of Ottawa's Wellington Street was blocked off by Freedom Convoy supporters, such as this one, pictured on Feb. 17, 2022, for more than three weeks last winter. This would not have been allowed to happen if the protesters were Indigenous people. This is what racism looks like on a grand, national scale, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 31, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 31, 2022
Most of Ottawa's Wellington Street was blocked off by Freedom Convoy supporters, such as this one, pictured on Feb. 17, 2022, for more than three weeks last winter. This would not have been allowed to happen if the protesters were Indigenous people. This is what racism looks like on a grand, national scale, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 17, 2022
Indigenous women, pictured Feb. 24, 2020, protesting against the Coastal Gas pipeline. In a sample of more than 21,000 women in leadership positions in corporate Canada, fewer than one per cent of c-suite roles are held by Indigenous women, according to the 2022 Annual Report Card on Gender Diversity and Leadership by the Prosperity Project. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 17, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 17, 2022
Indigenous women, pictured Feb. 24, 2020, protesting against the Coastal Gas pipeline. In a sample of more than 21,000 women in leadership positions in corporate Canada, fewer than one per cent of c-suite roles are held by Indigenous women, according to the 2022 Annual Report Card on Gender Diversity and Leadership by the Prosperity Project. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 3, 2022
During the Sept. 24 women’s rugby match between the Ottawa Gee-Gees and Bishop’s Gaiters, rugby fans were shown the beauty and strength of Indigenous cultures, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Greg Kolz
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 3, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 3, 2022
During the Sept. 24 women’s rugby match between the Ottawa Gee-Gees and Bishop’s Gaiters, rugby fans were shown the beauty and strength of Indigenous cultures, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Greg Kolz
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 19, 2022
Algonquin Elder and University of Ottawa chancellor Claudette Commanda, pictured on the Hill on Sept. 30, 2021, at the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 19, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 19, 2022
Algonquin Elder and University of Ottawa chancellor Claudette Commanda, pictured on the Hill on Sept. 30, 2021, at the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 5, 2022
A 'freedom movement' supporter wields a sign that reads 'monkey pox' but crosses out 'pox' and instead reads 'monkey business' at a 'freedom' rally in Ottawa on July 1, 2022. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 5, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 5, 2022
A 'freedom movement' supporter wields a sign that reads 'monkey pox' but crosses out 'pox' and instead reads 'monkey business' at a 'freedom' rally in Ottawa on July 1, 2022. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 22, 2022
Minister of Health Jean-Yves Duclos. Canada’s health care costs more than it should because of a lack of national co-ordination, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 22, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 22, 2022
Minister of Health Jean-Yves Duclos. Canada’s health care costs more than it should because of a lack of national co-ordination, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 8, 2022
Willie Littlechild, pictured here on July 25, 2022, in Maskwacîs, Alta., where he was born, listening to Pope Francis officially apologize to Indigenous people for the Catholic Church's role in running the residential schools in Canada for more than 100 years. Photograph courtesy of PMO/photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 8, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 8, 2022
Willie Littlechild, pictured here on July 25, 2022, in Maskwacîs, Alta., where he was born, listening to Pope Francis officially apologize to Indigenous people for the Catholic Church's role in running the residential schools in Canada for more than 100 years. Photograph courtesy of PMO/photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 4, 2022
Two Métis children with an Inuit child, pictured at the All Saints Residential School, Shingle Point, Yukon, 1930. A museum and memorial on residential schools would ensure that Canada never forgets what it did to Indigenous children from coast to coast to coast, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 4, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 4, 2022
Two Métis children with an Inuit child, pictured at the All Saints Residential School, Shingle Point, Yukon, 1930. A museum and memorial on residential schools would ensure that Canada never forgets what it did to Indigenous children from coast to coast to coast, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 20, 2022
Red Sky Performance dancers, pictured Sept. 30, 2019, at the Honouring National Day for Truth and Reconciliation ceremony at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau. Rose LeMay is suggesting that Canadians celebrate National Indigenous Day on June 21, 'I submit that we might celebrate truth. After 150 some years, we have finally pulled back the curtain on the truth of residential schools. They were not to educate, they existed to extinguish Indigenous peoples, and yet we are still here.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 20, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 20, 2022
Red Sky Performance dancers, pictured Sept. 30, 2019, at the Honouring National Day for Truth and Reconciliation ceremony at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau. Rose LeMay is suggesting that Canadians celebrate National Indigenous Day on June 21, 'I submit that we might celebrate truth. After 150 some years, we have finally pulled back the curtain on the truth of residential schools. They were not to educate, they existed to extinguish Indigenous peoples, and yet we are still here.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 6, 2022
Indigenous women, pictured at the Museum of History in Gatineau, Que., on June 3, 2019, at the public closing ceremony of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 6, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 6, 2022
Indigenous women, pictured at the Museum of History in Gatineau, Que., on June 3, 2019, at the public closing ceremony of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 23, 2022
A makeshift flower memorial at the intersection of Hyde Park Road and South Carriage Road, two days after a man in London, Ont., rammed his truck into Muslim Pakistani Canadian pedestrians at this intersection, killing four family members, on June 6, 2021. Mass shootings by white males is not senseless—they are following a pattern formed in racism. To call it senseless means we don’t have to dig in as to why Canadian society is growing a virulent strain of white terrorism, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 23, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 23, 2022
A makeshift flower memorial at the intersection of Hyde Park Road and South Carriage Road, two days after a man in London, Ont., rammed his truck into Muslim Pakistani Canadian pedestrians at this intersection, killing four family members, on June 6, 2021. Mass shootings by white males is not senseless—they are following a pattern formed in racism. To call it senseless means we don’t have to dig in as to why Canadian society is growing a virulent strain of white terrorism, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 9, 2022
Protesters, pictured on June 5, 2020, on the Hill at a rally to call attention to anti-Black racism and police violence against Black people across Canada and the United States. There is an argument that we should demand that people have life experience before applying to police academies, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 9, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 9, 2022
Protesters, pictured on June 5, 2020, on the Hill at a rally to call attention to anti-Black racism and police violence against Black people across Canada and the United States. There is an argument that we should demand that people have life experience before applying to police academies, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 25, 2022
Jessica Wood, assistant deputy minister of British Columbia's Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Secretariat, is Gitxsan and Tsimshian. Screen capture image courtesy of YouTube
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 25, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 25, 2022
Jessica Wood, assistant deputy minister of British Columbia's Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Secretariat, is Gitxsan and Tsimshian. Screen capture image courtesy of YouTube
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 11, 2022
Pope Francis, pictured at the Vatican on April 1, 2022, apologizing to Indigenous people in Canada for the 'deplorable' abuses they were forced to endure in Canada's Catholic-run residential schools. A delegation of Indigenous people from Canada was at the Vatican, but the Pope said he hopes to deliver an apology in Canada in late July. More than 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend the government-funded Christian schools for almost 100 years, and many children were abused, beaten, and sexually assaulted. Screen capture courtesy CBC News
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 11, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 11, 2022
Pope Francis, pictured at the Vatican on April 1, 2022, apologizing to Indigenous people in Canada for the 'deplorable' abuses they were forced to endure in Canada's Catholic-run residential schools. A delegation of Indigenous people from Canada was at the Vatican, but the Pope said he hopes to deliver an apology in Canada in late July. More than 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend the government-funded Christian schools for almost 100 years, and many children were abused, beaten, and sexually assaulted. Screen capture courtesy CBC News
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 28, 2022
Sylvie Hauth, chief of police for the Thunder Bay Police Service, pictured in a Thunder Bay Police video explaining the police force's 'Breaking Barriers' initiative to end racism and break down barriers between Indigenous, and other racialized people and the police. Screen capture courtesy of Thunder Bay Police Service
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 28, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 28, 2022
Sylvie Hauth, chief of police for the Thunder Bay Police Service, pictured in a Thunder Bay Police video explaining the police force's 'Breaking Barriers' initiative to end racism and break down barriers between Indigenous, and other racialized people and the police. Screen capture courtesy of Thunder Bay Police Service
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 14, 2022
Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Feb. 24, 2022, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Defence Minister Anita Anand at a press conference reacting to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. It’s time for the prime minister to start doing daily briefings with Anand and Freeland, and to share as much as they can to lead this country through our next crisis, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 14, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 14, 2022
Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Feb. 24, 2022, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Defence Minister Anita Anand at a press conference reacting to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. It’s time for the prime minister to start doing daily briefings with Anand and Freeland, and to share as much as they can to lead this country through our next crisis, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 28, 2022
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, who's running to be prime minister of Canada, supported the 'Freedom Convoy,' which occupied downtown Ottawa and the Parliamentary Precinct area for more than three weeks until police had to forcibly remove them. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 28, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 28, 2022
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, who's running to be prime minister of Canada, supported the 'Freedom Convoy,' which occupied downtown Ottawa and the Parliamentary Precinct area for more than three weeks until police had to forcibly remove them. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 14, 2022
A Freedom Convoy supporter sits with gas cans on Wellington Street on Feb. 10, 2022 as the convoy’s occupation of downtown Ottawa enters the second week. If we have to bring in another police force, so be it. If we have to bring in the military, so be it. The alternative is that we might have to tell the story about how we failed to challenge white supremacy in our neighbourhoods in the winter of 2022, and how it all went so badly after that, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Rose LeMay
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 14, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 14, 2022
A Freedom Convoy supporter sits with gas cans on Wellington Street on Feb. 10, 2022 as the convoy’s occupation of downtown Ottawa enters the second week. If we have to bring in another police force, so be it. If we have to bring in the military, so be it. The alternative is that we might have to tell the story about how we failed to challenge white supremacy in our neighbourhoods in the winter of 2022, and how it all went so badly after that, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Rose LeMay
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 31, 2022
Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole, pictured on Dec. 6, 2021, on the Hill. Do we expect that political leaders and influencers in this country speak truth with a sense of responsibility to each other? Do we demand that political leaders and influencers speak with responsibility not only to their own followers but also to those who might disagree? If not, why not, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 31, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 31, 2022
Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole, pictured on Dec. 6, 2021, on the Hill. Do we expect that political leaders and influencers in this country speak truth with a sense of responsibility to each other? Do we demand that political leaders and influencers speak with responsibility not only to their own followers but also to those who might disagree? If not, why not, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 17, 2022
Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, pictured on the Hill on Nov. 12, 2019, and who tested positive for COVID last week, choses a distinctly southern-U.S.-state approach, let COVID run free and we’ll all be free, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 17, 2022
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | January 17, 2022
Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, pictured on the Hill on Nov. 12, 2019, and who tested positive for COVID last week, choses a distinctly southern-U.S.-state approach, let COVID run free and we’ll all be free, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 20, 2021
The Low Down to Hull and Back News in Wakefield, Que., broke what became a national story about elementary school teacher Fatemeh Anvari who was forced out of her classroom in Chelsea because she wears a hijab, thanks to Bill 21 which rules that civil servants not wear any religious symbols. Image courtesy of The Low Down
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 20, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 20, 2021
The Low Down to Hull and Back News in Wakefield, Que., broke what became a national story about elementary school teacher Fatemeh Anvari who was forced out of her classroom in Chelsea because she wears a hijab, thanks to Bill 21 which rules that civil servants not wear any religious symbols. Image courtesy of The Low Down
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 6, 2021
People, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 7, 2020, at a rally in support of Wet’suwet’en land defenders. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 6, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | December 6, 2021
People, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 7, 2020, at a rally in support of Wet’suwet’en land defenders. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 8, 2021
Indigenous women, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 24, 2020, protesting against the Coastal Gas Pipeline. The question of Indigenous identity must go back to the grandmothers to determine. Grandmothers might just uphold a principle of grace—just like holders of counterfeit currency, the holder might not know it’s counterfeit. And grandmothers might just adopt people like we used to do traditionally. Reconciliation means the outsider never defines nor restricts an Indigenous individual’s identity nor belonging. It is up to the community, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 8, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | November 8, 2021
Indigenous women, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 24, 2020, protesting against the Coastal Gas Pipeline. The question of Indigenous identity must go back to the grandmothers to determine. Grandmothers might just uphold a principle of grace—just like holders of counterfeit currency, the holder might not know it’s counterfeit. And grandmothers might just adopt people like we used to do traditionally. Reconciliation means the outsider never defines nor restricts an Indigenous individual’s identity nor belonging. It is up to the community, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 25, 2021
Learn and tell the truth. Canada has been a great country for many, but not for all. When leaders attempt to glorify its history, Indigenous peoples, pictured on the Hill on Sept. 30, marking Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, are intentionally erased and their experiences denied. Criminalize residential school denial and hate speech against Indigenous peoples, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 25, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 25, 2021
Learn and tell the truth. Canada has been a great country for many, but not for all. When leaders attempt to glorify its history, Indigenous peoples, pictured on the Hill on Sept. 30, marking Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, are intentionally erased and their experiences denied. Criminalize residential school denial and hate speech against Indigenous peoples, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 11, 2021
While the prime minister flew off for a family vacation on the first-ever National Indigenous Reconciliation Day, hundreds walked to Parliament Hill to mark the statutory holiday. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 11, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | October 11, 2021
While the prime minister flew off for a family vacation on the first-ever National Indigenous Reconciliation Day, hundreds walked to Parliament Hill to mark the statutory holiday. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 29, 2021
Not only do Canadians need to come to grips with the facts that the country has ardently fought against Indigenous rights, and just as resolutely stood idly by as children died. But Canadians are also coming to grips with the fact that the federal government is still not acting in the best interest of Indigenous kids, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 29, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 29, 2021
Not only do Canadians need to come to grips with the facts that the country has ardently fought against Indigenous rights, and just as resolutely stood idly by as children died. But Canadians are also coming to grips with the fact that the federal government is still not acting in the best interest of Indigenous kids, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 20, 2021
Shoes and stuffed animals, pictured June 1, 2021, were left at the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill to show respect for the lives of the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found in May on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 20, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 20, 2021
Shoes and stuffed animals, pictured June 1, 2021, were left at the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill to show respect for the lives of the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found in May on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 6, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul. Canada's political parties aren't doing enough to promote diversity and respect, writes Rose Lemay. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 6, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | September 6, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and Green Party Leader Annamie Paul. Canada's political parties aren't doing enough to promote diversity and respect, writes Rose Lemay. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 23, 2021
Officials and schoolchildren outside Providence Mission Indian Residential School, Fort Providence, Northwest Territories, circa 1920. Photograph courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 23, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | August 23, 2021
Officials and schoolchildren outside Providence Mission Indian Residential School, Fort Providence, Northwest Territories, circa 1920. Photograph courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 26, 2021
Officials and schoolchildren, pictured outside the Providence Mission Indian Residential School, Fort Providence, N.W.T., circa 1920. A whole line of political and civil service leaders through history didn’t want you to know the truth—truly a Canadian pact of forgetting. Those who continue to spew some propaganda to uphold 'the good intent' of residential schools need to be held accountable, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of the Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 26, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 26, 2021
Officials and schoolchildren, pictured outside the Providence Mission Indian Residential School, Fort Providence, N.W.T., circa 1920. A whole line of political and civil service leaders through history didn’t want you to know the truth—truly a Canadian pact of forgetting. Those who continue to spew some propaganda to uphold 'the good intent' of residential schools need to be held accountable, writes Rose LeMay. Photograph courtesy of the Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 12, 2021
The GG's role can be wielded in ways that influences national discourse, and there is no doubt that Mary Simon has the skill to do just that. Indigenous kids will have a strong role model in her on how to change the world, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 12, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | July 12, 2021
The GG's role can be wielded in ways that influences national discourse, and there is no doubt that Mary Simon has the skill to do just that. Indigenous kids will have a strong role model in her on how to change the world, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 28, 2021
Students of the Metlakatla Indian Residential School in British Columbia. Photograph courtesy of William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 28, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 28, 2021
Students of the Metlakatla Indian Residential School in British Columbia. Photograph courtesy of William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 14, 2021
An Indigenous woman, pictured at a drumming circle on June 3, 2021, on Parliament Hill honouring the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered last month at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. National Indigenous Day on June 21 is not just for Indigenous peoples. It is a day for Canadians to pause and consider the experience of Indigenous peoples in Canada, both the good and the bad, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 14, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 14, 2021
An Indigenous woman, pictured at a drumming circle on June 3, 2021, on Parliament Hill honouring the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered last month at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. National Indigenous Day on June 21 is not just for Indigenous peoples. It is a day for Canadians to pause and consider the experience of Indigenous peoples in Canada, both the good and the bad, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 7, 2021
Organized by the Odawa Native Friendship Centre to honour the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered two weeks ago at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, people placed 215 pairs of shoes and boots to honour their memory at the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill on June 3, 2021. The discovery of the mass grave has attracted international headlines. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 7, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | June 7, 2021
Organized by the Odawa Native Friendship Centre to honour the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered two weeks ago at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, people placed 215 pairs of shoes and boots to honour their memory at the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill on June 3, 2021. The discovery of the mass grave has attracted international headlines. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 31, 2021
Bloc Québecois Leader Yves-François Blanchet introduced a motion in the House of Commons seeking support for Quebec's Bill 96. It received support from MPs in other parties, but was stymied by Independent MP Jody-Wilson Raybould. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 31, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 31, 2021
Bloc Québecois Leader Yves-François Blanchet introduced a motion in the House of Commons seeking support for Quebec's Bill 96. It received support from MPs in other parties, but was stymied by Independent MP Jody-Wilson Raybould. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 17, 2021
Indigenous women, pictured Feb. 24, 2020, demonstrating against the building of the Coastal Gasoline pipeline through traditional Indigenous territory. Once upon a time, not so long ago, First Nations and many Indigenous societies governed with balance—men and women, including Two Spirits, equally shared the roles of leadership to serve a community. It wasn’t perfect. No governance structure is perfect, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 17, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 17, 2021
Indigenous women, pictured Feb. 24, 2020, demonstrating against the building of the Coastal Gasoline pipeline through traditional Indigenous territory. Once upon a time, not so long ago, First Nations and many Indigenous societies governed with balance—men and women, including Two Spirits, equally shared the roles of leadership to serve a community. It wasn’t perfect. No governance structure is perfect, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 3, 2021
Conservative MP Tamara Jansen, who represents Cloverdale-Langley City, B.C., attracted national attention when she seemed to suggest during third reading debate on April 16 of Bill C-6, which seeks to ban conversion therapy, that 'lesbian activity' could be stopped with counselling. Photograph courtesy of Conservative party of Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 3, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | May 3, 2021
Conservative MP Tamara Jansen, who represents Cloverdale-Langley City, B.C., attracted national attention when she seemed to suggest during third reading debate on April 16 of Bill C-6, which seeks to ban conversion therapy, that 'lesbian activity' could be stopped with counselling. Photograph courtesy of Conservative party of Canada
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 19, 2021
Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam and deputy Chief Public Health Officer Howard Njoo, pictured Dec. 11, 2020, on the Hill. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 19, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 19, 2021
Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam and deputy Chief Public Health Officer Howard Njoo, pictured Dec. 11, 2020, on the Hill. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 5, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau jumped in and voiced his displeasure that anybody vilify his good friend Quebec Premier François Legault, or say anything bad about Quebec. The prime minister could have chosen to speak to the subject of racism with the intent to support constructive discourse rather than attempt to shut it down, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 5, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | April 5, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau jumped in and voiced his displeasure that anybody vilify his good friend Quebec Premier François Legault, or say anything bad about Quebec. The prime minister could have chosen to speak to the subject of racism with the intent to support constructive discourse rather than attempt to shut it down, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 22, 2021
Rose LeMay, pictured, 'I am status, card-carrying First Nations—the federal government calls me a real one. The status card is a race-based ethnic identity card used to limit access to certain federal government programs for real First Nations peoples only.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 22, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 22, 2021
Rose LeMay, pictured, 'I am status, card-carrying First Nations—the federal government calls me a real one. The status card is a race-based ethnic identity card used to limit access to certain federal government programs for real First Nations peoples only.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 8, 2021
Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller, pictured on the Hill on May 14, 2020. Here’s an idea: let’s put the Indigenous Services Canada in charge of water and infrastructure for Ottawa residents and Parliament Hill. Anybody want to do this? I didn’t think so, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 8, 2021
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | March 8, 2021
Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller, pictured on the Hill on May 14, 2020. Here’s an idea: let’s put the Indigenous Services Canada in charge of water and infrastructure for Ottawa residents and Parliament Hill. Anybody want to do this? I didn’t think so, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ROSE LEMAY | February 22, 2021
Quebec Premier François Legault, pictured Sept. 18, 2020, in Ottawa after a premiers' meeting. Academia is not about the freedom to speak any dumb idea or thought that one might have. Academia was intended to play the role of 'critic and conscience of society' and that’s a serious responsibility, writes Rose LeMay. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade