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Sunday, December 4, 2022
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David Crane

Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 28, 2022
Industry Minister François-Philippe Champagne is scouring the world, from Japan and South Korea, to the United States and Germany, offering foreign corporations billions of dollars in subsidies to come and build the next economy for us. But he is building a branch-plant economy where the decision-making powers rest in foreign head offices. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 28, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 28, 2022
Industry Minister François-Philippe Champagne is scouring the world, from Japan and South Korea, to the United States and Germany, offering foreign corporations billions of dollars in subsidies to come and build the next economy for us. But he is building a branch-plant economy where the decision-making powers rest in foreign head offices. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 21, 2022
U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken, left, and Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, pictured Oct. 27, 2022, holding a joint press conference in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 21, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 21, 2022
U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken, left, and Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, pictured Oct. 27, 2022, holding a joint press conference in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 14, 2022
Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured in a Hill scrum on Oct. 26, 2022. We have to take this innovation challenge much more seriously. While many worry about China, we must also worry about the new American challenge, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 14, 2022
Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured in a Hill scrum on Oct. 26, 2022. We have to take this innovation challenge much more seriously. While many worry about China, we must also worry about the new American challenge, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 7, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Nov. 3, 2022, holding a press conference at the Sir John A. Macdonald Building in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 7, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | November 7, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Nov. 3, 2022, holding a press conference at the Sir John A. Macdonald Building in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 31, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government has failed to unite Canadians behind transformative climate action, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 31, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 31, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government has failed to unite Canadians behind transformative climate action, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 24, 2022
From left: Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia, sits next to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne at an event in Kanata, Ont. on Oct. 17 to announce the expansion of the Nokia Campus on March Road. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 24, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 24, 2022
From left: Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia, sits next to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne at an event in Kanata, Ont. on Oct. 17 to announce the expansion of the Nokia Campus on March Road. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 17, 2022
Parroting the position of U.S. President Joe Biden's administration, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, in a recent Washington speech, signalled Canada’s support for, effectively, a league or concert of democracies that would exclude countries that did not follow Western practices. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 17, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 17, 2022
Parroting the position of U.S. President Joe Biden's administration, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, in a recent Washington speech, signalled Canada’s support for, effectively, a league or concert of democracies that would exclude countries that did not follow Western practices. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 10, 2022
Federal Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan, left, Rural Economic Development Minister Gudie Hutchings, second from right, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Sept. 28, 2022, in Port aux Basques, N.L., which suffered devastating damage from Hurricane Fiona. Photograph courtesy of Gudie Hutchings' Twitter handle
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 10, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | October 10, 2022
Federal Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan, left, Rural Economic Development Minister Gudie Hutchings, second from right, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Sept. 28, 2022, in Port aux Basques, N.L., which suffered devastating damage from Hurricane Fiona. Photograph courtesy of Gudie Hutchings' Twitter handle
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 29, 2022
Minister of Labour Seamus O’Regan, pictured in Ottawa on Sept. 19, 2022. This jobs gap means the growth potential of the economy is being held back, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 29, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 29, 2022
Minister of Labour Seamus O’Regan, pictured in Ottawa on Sept. 19, 2022. This jobs gap means the growth potential of the economy is being held back, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 26, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Nov. 2, 2017, taking part in an armchair discussion with Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt at the Google Canada's GO North conference in Toronto Photograph courtesy of PMO/photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 26, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 26, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Nov. 2, 2017, taking part in an armchair discussion with Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt at the Google Canada's GO North conference in Toronto Photograph courtesy of PMO/photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 19, 2022
Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson is likely aware of the risks of the transition to a green economy, which will be highly disruptive, changing the kinds of industries and jobs we need, and turning carbon-intensive assets into stranded assets. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 19, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 19, 2022
Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson is likely aware of the risks of the transition to a green economy, which will be highly disruptive, changing the kinds of industries and jobs we need, and turning carbon-intensive assets into stranded assets. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 12, 2022
What we need today are not backward-looking diatribes from zealous fossil-fuel advocates seeking to allocate capital to projects that threaten worse climate change, but rather forward-looking Canadians who want to be a part of the new-energy world, based on the opportunities for a better world future. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 12, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 12, 2022
What we need today are not backward-looking diatribes from zealous fossil-fuel advocates seeking to allocate capital to projects that threaten worse climate change, but rather forward-looking Canadians who want to be a part of the new-energy world, based on the opportunities for a better world future. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 5, 2022
International Trade and Small Business Minister Mary Ng recently announced the Global Hypergrowth Project or GHP, which will select and help up to 15 small-size corporate winners, chosen by a panel from the venture capital industry. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 5, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | September 5, 2022
International Trade and Small Business Minister Mary Ng recently announced the Global Hypergrowth Project or GHP, which will select and help up to 15 small-size corporate winners, chosen by a panel from the venture capital industry. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 29, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz during the chancellor's visit to Montreal, Que., on Aug. 21. Photograph courtesy of PMO/Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 29, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 29, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz during the chancellor's visit to Montreal, Que., on Aug. 21. Photograph courtesy of PMO/Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 22, 2022
The reason the world was able to create COVID-19 vaccines so quickly, argues David Crane, was because government, business, and civil society all had a vested interest and a shared goal. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pictured receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. Photograph courtesy of PMO/Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 22, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 22, 2022
The reason the world was able to create COVID-19 vaccines so quickly, argues David Crane, was because government, business, and civil society all had a vested interest and a shared goal. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pictured receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. Photograph courtesy of PMO/Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 8, 2022
The interior of an IBM quantum computing system, pictured October 2019. According to the New Scientist, quantum computers 'are machines that use the properties of quantum physics to store data and perform computations,' which 'can be extremely advantageous for certain tasks where they could vastly outperform even our best supercomputers.' Photograph courtesy Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 8, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | August 8, 2022
The interior of an IBM quantum computing system, pictured October 2019. According to the New Scientist, quantum computers 'are machines that use the properties of quantum physics to store data and perform computations,' which 'can be extremely advantageous for certain tasks where they could vastly outperform even our best supercomputers.' Photograph courtesy Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 28, 2022
Conservative leadership candidates Pierre Poilievre and Jean Charest, the two front-runners, would scrap much of the federal climate change action plan, including the carbon tax, and push development of oil and gas projects and production, despite the threat this would pose to the world’s climate. It seems they would govern as though the future didn’t matter. But a commitment to serious action on climate change should be a litmus test for anyone who wants to be prime minister, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 28, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 28, 2022
Conservative leadership candidates Pierre Poilievre and Jean Charest, the two front-runners, would scrap much of the federal climate change action plan, including the carbon tax, and push development of oil and gas projects and production, despite the threat this would pose to the world’s climate. It seems they would govern as though the future didn’t matter. But a commitment to serious action on climate change should be a litmus test for anyone who wants to be prime minister, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 25, 2022
People, pictured Sept. 3, 2019, in downtown Ottawa. While public-sector workers are well-protected—90.2 per cent have a registered pension plan—only 24.1 per cent of the much larger workforce in the private sector have a plan, according to the latest data from Statistics Canada. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 25, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 25, 2022
People, pictured Sept. 3, 2019, in downtown Ottawa. While public-sector workers are well-protected—90.2 per cent have a registered pension plan—only 24.1 per cent of the much larger workforce in the private sector have a plan, according to the latest data from Statistics Canada. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 14, 2022
Minister of National Defence Anita Anand scrums with reporters at the CANSEC trade show in Ottawa on June 1, 2022. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 14, 2022
Minister of National Defence Anita Anand scrums with reporters at the CANSEC trade show in Ottawa on June 1, 2022. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 11, 2022
Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured here on June 16, dropped the term 'superclusters' and is now calling them 'global innovation clusters.' This is what often passes for progress in Ottawa, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 11, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 11, 2022
Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured here on June 16, dropped the term 'superclusters' and is now calling them 'global innovation clusters.' This is what often passes for progress in Ottawa, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 4, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 21, 2022, in Ottawa. It will take a much more activist and focused government approach if we are to expand our capacity for exports of clean technologies to offset the eventual fall in fossil-fuel exports and capitalize on the huge future market in the green revolution, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 4, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | July 4, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 21, 2022, in Ottawa. It will take a much more activist and focused government approach if we are to expand our capacity for exports of clean technologies to offset the eventual fall in fossil-fuel exports and capitalize on the huge future market in the green revolution, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 27, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 6, 2022, in Ottawa. Too often, Canada has sacrificed its interests or pursued policies contrary to our stated values to curry favour with the U.S., writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 27, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 27, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 6, 2022, in Ottawa. Too often, Canada has sacrificed its interests or pursued policies contrary to our stated values to curry favour with the U.S., writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 20, 2022
What appalled many Canadians about the trucker protests in Ottawa was not only the emergence of extremist groups, but the failure of police forces and other law-enforcement and intelligence agencies to deal with the protesters, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 20, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 20, 2022
What appalled many Canadians about the trucker protests in Ottawa was not only the emergence of extremist groups, but the failure of police forces and other law-enforcement and intelligence agencies to deal with the protesters, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 13, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 6. In a world of secular stagnation, governments will find themselves unable to deliver on promises of healthcare and pensions and workers will see a shrinkage in living standards, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 13, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 13, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 6. In a world of secular stagnation, governments will find themselves unable to deliver on promises of healthcare and pensions and workers will see a shrinkage in living standards, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 6, 2022
Rather than clinging to the fantasy that we can have our cake and eat it too—that we can have a strong oil and gas industry and achieve net zero emissions economy—it is time to wake up as a country and acknowledge that without much stronger action, we face a dire future, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Pexels
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 6, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | June 6, 2022
Rather than clinging to the fantasy that we can have our cake and eat it too—that we can have a strong oil and gas industry and achieve net zero emissions economy—it is time to wake up as a country and acknowledge that without much stronger action, we face a dire future, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Pexels
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 30, 2022
U.S. President Joe Biden, China's President Xi Jinping, and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured. For Canada, this would mean a foreign policy where we are ready to advocate for a multipolar world with effective global institutions to increase  prospects for peace and deal with the big and urgent problems the world faces, starting with climate change, writes David Crane. Photographs courtesy of Flickr and The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 30, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 30, 2022
U.S. President Joe Biden, China's President Xi Jinping, and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured. For Canada, this would mean a foreign policy where we are ready to advocate for a multipolar world with effective global institutions to increase  prospects for peace and deal with the big and urgent problems the world faces, starting with climate change, writes David Crane. Photographs courtesy of Flickr and The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 20, 2022
'We know that one day—hopefully one day soon—this war will come to an end,' Defence Minister Anita Anand, pictured, said recently to the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, referencing the conflict in Ukraine. Which meant, she went on to say, that 'we must contemplate the world order that awaits Canada on the other side.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 20, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 20, 2022
'We know that one day—hopefully one day soon—this war will come to an end,' Defence Minister Anita Anand, pictured, said recently to the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, referencing the conflict in Ukraine. Which meant, she went on to say, that 'we must contemplate the world order that awaits Canada on the other side.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 16, 2022
Industry Minister François-Philippe Champagne, writes David Crane, has been writing big cheques to pay foreign automakers to produce electric vehicles here, but the intellectually property will  be owned outside Canada and the gains will flow to other countries.  The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 16, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 16, 2022
Industry Minister François-Philippe Champagne, writes David Crane, has been writing big cheques to pay foreign automakers to produce electric vehicles here, but the intellectually property will  be owned outside Canada and the gains will flow to other countries.  The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 9, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured on Dec. 13, 2021, arriving at a press conference with Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem. But does Freeland or anyone at Finance Canada, know how you would determine whether Canada was a world leader in innovation, research, and development, or what it would take to get there? The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 9, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 9, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured on Dec. 13, 2021, arriving at a press conference with Governor of the Bank of Canada Tiff Macklem. But does Freeland or anyone at Finance Canada, know how you would determine whether Canada was a world leader in innovation, research, and development, or what it would take to get there? The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 2, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, greeting the media and store clerks at the shoe store in the Rideau Centre where she bought her budget-day shoes. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 2, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | May 2, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, greeting the media and store clerks at the shoe store in the Rideau Centre where she bought her budget-day shoes. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 25, 2022
These shoes are made for walking: Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, buying her budget-day shoes at the Rideau Centre in Ottawa. David Crane argues that the federal government's big growth challenge will be how to reform our institutions so that we can accelerate the transition to an economy based on ideas and intangibles, which is where a new growth agenda must focus. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 25, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 25, 2022
These shoes are made for walking: Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, buying her budget-day shoes at the Rideau Centre in Ottawa. David Crane argues that the federal government's big growth challenge will be how to reform our institutions so that we can accelerate the transition to an economy based on ideas and intangibles, which is where a new growth agenda must focus. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 18, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, out shopping for her budget-day shoes at the Rideau Centre in Ottawa. While some foreign investment can help, it is really up to our own companies to deliver prosperity. That won’t happen if we rely on subsidizing foreign investment, without regard for Canadian enterprise benefits, and if we continue our policy that means almost all of our companies are for sale to the highest foreign bidder, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 18, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 18, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 6, 2022, out shopping for her budget-day shoes at the Rideau Centre in Ottawa. While some foreign investment can help, it is really up to our own companies to deliver prosperity. That won’t happen if we rely on subsidizing foreign investment, without regard for Canadian enterprise benefits, and if we continue our policy that means almost all of our companies are for sale to the highest foreign bidder, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 11, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 7, 2022, at a press conference in Ottawa on budget day. Contrary to what Freeland is saying, a really smart politician would engage with all Canadians on how we build a more successful economy and society. And that means talking much more about productivity, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 11, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 11, 2022
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured April 7, 2022, at a press conference in Ottawa on budget day. Contrary to what Freeland is saying, a really smart politician would engage with all Canadians on how we build a more successful economy and society. And that means talking much more about productivity, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 4, 2022
Environment and Climate Change Minister Steven Guilbeault, pictured Jan. 31, 2022, on the Hill. It is very much in the broad public interest that Canada, and the world, make the transition to a decarbonized way of life, and that we do it as rapidly as we can. But it will take hard choices, not hype, to succeed. Leadership is about hard choices, not sugar-coating the changes that must be made, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 4, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | April 4, 2022
Environment and Climate Change Minister Steven Guilbeault, pictured Jan. 31, 2022, on the Hill. It is very much in the broad public interest that Canada, and the world, make the transition to a decarbonized way of life, and that we do it as rapidly as we can. But it will take hard choices, not hype, to succeed. Leadership is about hard choices, not sugar-coating the changes that must be made, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 28, 2022
Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, pictured March 15, 2022, virtually addressing Canada's Parliament. The Russian invasion of Ukraine is triggering many responses in Canada, including calls for more aid to Ukraine, tougher sanctions against Russia, accelerated welcoming of displaced Ukrainian families, dramatic new defence spending and ways for our oil industry to profit, writes David Crane. Screen capture image courtesy of CBCNN
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 28, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 28, 2022
Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, pictured March 15, 2022, virtually addressing Canada's Parliament. The Russian invasion of Ukraine is triggering many responses in Canada, including calls for more aid to Ukraine, tougher sanctions against Russia, accelerated welcoming of displaced Ukrainian families, dramatic new defence spending and ways for our oil industry to profit, writes David Crane. Screen capture image courtesy of CBCNN
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 21, 2022
Minster of Natural Resources Jonathan Wilkinson, pictured on Oct. 27, 2021, in Ottawa with staffers James Hutchingame, left, and Ian Cameron. Much of the focus today is on how to profit from the European and American decisions to wean themselves off Russian oil and gas. Wilkinson is hoping to pump an extra 200,000 barrels a day of high-carbon Canadian oil exports to the U.S., writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 21, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 21, 2022
Minster of Natural Resources Jonathan Wilkinson, pictured on Oct. 27, 2021, in Ottawa with staffers James Hutchingame, left, and Ian Cameron. Much of the focus today is on how to profit from the European and American decisions to wean themselves off Russian oil and gas. Wilkinson is hoping to pump an extra 200,000 barrels a day of high-carbon Canadian oil exports to the U.S., writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 14, 2022
Vladimir Putin's Eyes, art installation. Re-establishing that 'legitimacy' is the world’s biggest future challenge if we are to minimize future risks of conflict and solve global problems. This won’t be achieved as the U.S. is trying to do by dividing the world into a zero-sum competition between democracies and autocracies. It will be achieved by designing the guidelines for a workable world community. That requires a different kind of statesmanship, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 7, 2022
While next-generation manufacturing is a national priority in the United States and countries such as Germany, it so far has not been a clear priority for Canada. U.S. President Joe Biden, for example, highlighted U.S. manufacturing in his State of the Union speech last week. Germany has published its own industrial strategy, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Pexels
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 7, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | March 7, 2022
While next-generation manufacturing is a national priority in the United States and countries such as Germany, it so far has not been a clear priority for Canada. U.S. President Joe Biden, for example, highlighted U.S. manufacturing in his State of the Union speech last week. Germany has published its own industrial strategy, writes David Crane. Image courtesy of Pexels
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 28, 2022
We should do what we can to be part of the battery-powered future. But our bigger strengths and greater potential are in hydrogen and fuel cells technologies, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 28, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 28, 2022
We should do what we can to be part of the battery-powered future. But our bigger strengths and greater potential are in hydrogen and fuel cells technologies, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 21, 2022
Finance Chrystia Freeland and Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem, pictured Dec. 13, 2021, in Ottawa. David Crane says the overpriced housing market and unrealistic increases in stock prices have the potential for a dangerous reckoning ahead, both for the Bank of Canada and for Freeland's forthcoming budget. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 21, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 21, 2022
Finance Chrystia Freeland and Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem, pictured Dec. 13, 2021, in Ottawa. David Crane says the overpriced housing market and unrealistic increases in stock prices have the potential for a dangerous reckoning ahead, both for the Bank of Canada and for Freeland's forthcoming budget. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 14, 2022
A 'Freedom Convoy' protester dances on the sidewalk across from the Prime Minister’s office on Feb. 10, 2022. This crusade for freedom and freedom of choice is misdirected. Freedom of choice is not a legal right. There is no freedom of choice in many areas of our daily lives because the welfare of the community comes ahead of preferences of individuals, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 14, 2022
Opinion | BY DAVID CRANE | February 14, 2022
A 'Freedom Convoy' protester dances on the sidewalk across from the Prime Minister’s office on Feb. 10, 2022. This crusade for freedom and freedom of choice is misdirected. Freedom of choice is not a legal right. There is no freedom of choice in many areas of our daily lives because the welfare of the community comes ahead of preferences of individuals, writes David Crane. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade