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Sunday, December 4, 2022
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Susan Riley

Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 28, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Chinese President Xi Jinping, pictured on Nov. 16, 2022, at the G20 in Bali, Indonesia. Xi chided Trudeau for 'leaked' discussions to the newspapers. Screen capture image courtesy of CBCNN
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 28, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 28, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Chinese President Xi Jinping, pictured on Nov. 16, 2022, at the G20 in Bali, Indonesia. Xi chided Trudeau for 'leaked' discussions to the newspapers. Screen capture image courtesy of CBCNN
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 14, 2022
It is both striking and unsurprising that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured taking questions from reporters on the Hill on Oct. 26, 2022, isn’t attending the latest international climate conference in Egypt, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 14, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 14, 2022
It is both striking and unsurprising that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured taking questions from reporters on the Hill on Oct. 26, 2022, isn’t attending the latest international climate conference in Egypt, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 31, 2022
At Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem's well-attended press conference last week, he predicted a period of discomfort followed by a return to two per cent inflation by 2024 and a healthy and growing economy, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 31, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 31, 2022
At Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem's well-attended press conference last week, he predicted a period of discomfort followed by a return to two per cent inflation by 2024 and a healthy and growing economy, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 17, 2022
Newly elected Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, pictured arriving at the Conservative national caucus meeting in the Sir John A. Macdonald Building on Sept. 12, 2022, with his wife Anaida and their son Cruz. It looks like a Poilievre 'pivot' on climate is inevitable—although it will be dressed up as a fairer, more equitable approach to containing emissions, not a complete policy reversal, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 17, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 17, 2022
Newly elected Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, pictured arriving at the Conservative national caucus meeting in the Sir John A. Macdonald Building on Sept. 12, 2022, with his wife Anaida and their son Cruz. It looks like a Poilievre 'pivot' on climate is inevitable—although it will be dressed up as a fairer, more equitable approach to containing emissions, not a complete policy reversal, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 3, 2022
There is another storm brewing in Canada this season and it isn’t a hurricane. It is a broad and disruptive labour shortage that is creating havoc everywhere, in our everyday life—and laying bare some troubling undercurrents, writes Susan Riley. The Hill TImes photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 3, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 3, 2022
There is another storm brewing in Canada this season and it isn’t a hurricane. It is a broad and disruptive labour shortage that is creating havoc everywhere, in our everyday life—and laying bare some troubling undercurrents, writes Susan Riley. The Hill TImes photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 19, 2022
Politicians, like the new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre, might be more productive if they admitted they actually do agree on certain basic points, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 19, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 19, 2022
Politicians, like the new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre, might be more productive if they admitted they actually do agree on certain basic points, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 5, 2022
Conservative leadership candidate Pierre Poilievre has tapped into a deep vein of discontent that has arisen in part out of economic uncertainty. Screenshot courtesy of Pierre Poilievre/YouTube
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 5, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 5, 2022
Conservative leadership candidate Pierre Poilievre has tapped into a deep vein of discontent that has arisen in part out of economic uncertainty. Screenshot courtesy of Pierre Poilievre/YouTube
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 8, 2022
Oilsands, pictured in Fort McMurray, Alta., in 2008. How can Ottawa justify billion-dollar programs—to clean up orphan wells, capture fugitive methane emissions, underwrite the construction of $50-billion carbon capture projects of dubious effectiveness—when the industry has emerged from a seven-year downturn rolling in cash? It can’t. It shouldn’t bother trying, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 8, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 8, 2022
Oilsands, pictured in Fort McMurray, Alta., in 2008. How can Ottawa justify billion-dollar programs—to clean up orphan wells, capture fugitive methane emissions, underwrite the construction of $50-billion carbon capture projects of dubious effectiveness—when the industry has emerged from a seven-year downturn rolling in cash? It can’t. It shouldn’t bother trying, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 25, 2022
A pedestrian, pictured on May 15, 2020, on Bank Street in downtown Ottawa. The most reliable medical advice now—amid a daily diet of contradictions, counter-claims, and lame reassurances from politicians—is to get your third shot, if you are among the 52 per cent of Canadians who haven’t yet been boosted. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 25, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 25, 2022
A pedestrian, pictured on May 15, 2020, on Bank Street in downtown Ottawa. The most reliable medical advice now—amid a daily diet of contradictions, counter-claims, and lame reassurances from politicians—is to get your third shot, if you are among the 52 per cent of Canadians who haven’t yet been boosted. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 4, 2022
The Prime Minister's Office, pictured on June 26, 2019, in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 4, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 4, 2022
The Prime Minister's Office, pictured on June 26, 2019, in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 20, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 1, 2022, taking a photo with school children. The barrage of negativity that threatens the Trudeau government isn’t unique. It's how our parliamentary system operates, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 20, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 20, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 1, 2022, taking a photo with school children. The barrage of negativity that threatens the Trudeau government isn’t unique. It's how our parliamentary system operates, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 6, 2022
Louise Arbour, pictured May 30 on the Hill, wants the minister to appoint an 'external monitor' to follow up on her recommendations and to give Anand a monthly progress report. This happens often with expert reports/commissions/audits—a requirement that progress be tracked, which is meant to keep the issue alive once the media moves on. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 6, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 6, 2022
Louise Arbour, pictured May 30 on the Hill, wants the minister to appoint an 'external monitor' to follow up on her recommendations and to give Anand a monthly progress report. This happens often with expert reports/commissions/audits—a requirement that progress be tracked, which is meant to keep the issue alive once the media moves on. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 23, 2022
Why isn’t the affable backbench Ontario MP, Scott Aitchison, pictured May 5, 2022, at the Canada Strong and Free Network's debate in Ottawa, leading the non-crazy contingent in the battle for the soul of the party? He is, unlike the rest of the field, demonstrably relatable, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 23, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 23, 2022
Why isn’t the affable backbench Ontario MP, Scott Aitchison, pictured May 5, 2022, at the Canada Strong and Free Network's debate in Ottawa, leading the non-crazy contingent in the battle for the soul of the party? He is, unlike the rest of the field, demonstrably relatable, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 9, 2022
In a recent interview on the popular Herle Burly podcast, Natural Resources Minister Wilkinson, pictured, justified his recent decision to allow the oil patch to increase production by 300,000 barrels a day—allegedly to replace the Russian oil that keeps European homes warm. Asked if this extra production doesn’t upend federal emissions reduction targets, Wilkinson insisted: 'You can actually do both.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 9, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 9, 2022
In a recent interview on the popular Herle Burly podcast, Natural Resources Minister Wilkinson, pictured, justified his recent decision to allow the oil patch to increase production by 300,000 barrels a day—allegedly to replace the Russian oil that keeps European homes warm. Asked if this extra production doesn’t upend federal emissions reduction targets, Wilkinson insisted: 'You can actually do both.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 25, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured March 22, 2022, on his way to a press conference at the Sir John A. Macdonald Building. Ten years from now—perhaps sooner—the national child-care program launched by the federal Liberals last year, and finalized in recent months, could well be celebrated as the country’s most important social and economic reform since medicare. If it survives, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 25, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 25, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured March 22, 2022, on his way to a press conference at the Sir John A. Macdonald Building. Ten years from now—perhaps sooner—the national child-care program launched by the federal Liberals last year, and finalized in recent months, could well be celebrated as the country’s most important social and economic reform since medicare. If it survives, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 11, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured on the Hill on budget day, April 7, 2022. Why is a government so far off its Paris Accord commitments even contemplating new fossil fuel projects? For the jobs, supposedly, but those jobs are less plentiful than they once were, and, given the finite future of oil, less permanent, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 11, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 11, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured on the Hill on budget day, April 7, 2022. Why is a government so far off its Paris Accord commitments even contemplating new fossil fuel projects? For the jobs, supposedly, but those jobs are less plentiful than they once were, and, given the finite future of oil, less permanent, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 28, 2022
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, both pictured at separate press conferences on the Hill on March 22, 2022, after the prime minister officially announced that the New Democrats have agreed to tentatively support the Liberal government on confidence votes until the next fixed election in October 2025. The Hill Times photographs by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 28, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 28, 2022
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, both pictured at separate press conferences on the Hill on March 22, 2022, after the prime minister officially announced that the New Democrats have agreed to tentatively support the Liberal government on confidence votes until the next fixed election in October 2025. The Hill Times photographs by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 14, 2022
This is me: Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, pictured Feb. 14, 2022, speaks with reporters outside the House of Commons before Question Period. Those who believe a prime minister Pierre Poilievre is unthinkable had better start thinking—particularly the sleepy-heads in the Liberal communications shop, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 14, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 14, 2022
This is me: Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, pictured Feb. 14, 2022, speaks with reporters outside the House of Commons before Question Period. Those who believe a prime minister Pierre Poilievre is unthinkable had better start thinking—particularly the sleepy-heads in the Liberal communications shop, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 28, 2022
Conservative MPs Alain Rayes, Michelle Rempel Garner and Eric Duncan, pictured, are considered to be more centrist or Red Tory Conservatives. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 28, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 28, 2022
Conservative MPs Alain Rayes, Michelle Rempel Garner and Eric Duncan, pictured, are considered to be more centrist or Red Tory Conservatives. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 14, 2022
'Freedom Trucker Convoy' protesters, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 5, 2022. The whiteness of the protest, as many have pointed out, also explains the extraordinary courtesies extended to demonstrators. But the longer they stay, and stay, the weaker our elected leaders look, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 14, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 14, 2022
'Freedom Trucker Convoy' protesters, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 5, 2022. The whiteness of the protest, as many have pointed out, also explains the extraordinary courtesies extended to demonstrators. But the longer they stay, and stay, the weaker our elected leaders look, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 31, 2022
Should Erin O'Toole fall through the trap door in the coming months, Pierre Poilievre could be the one taking the reins. If that happens, 'the Conservatives are destined to become a somewhat larger, equally bellicose, version of the People’s Party of Canada, still docked far from majority territory,' writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 31, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 31, 2022
Should Erin O'Toole fall through the trap door in the coming months, Pierre Poilievre could be the one taking the reins. If that happens, 'the Conservatives are destined to become a somewhat larger, equally bellicose, version of the People’s Party of Canada, still docked far from majority territory,' writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 17, 2022
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, PPC Leader Maxime Bernier, and Conservative Party Leader Erin O'Toole. Many voters would not want these harsh, angry men—no matter their politics—sitting on the local school board, never mind running the country, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 17, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 17, 2022
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, PPC Leader Maxime Bernier, and Conservative Party Leader Erin O'Toole. Many voters would not want these harsh, angry men—no matter their politics—sitting on the local school board, never mind running the country, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 10, 2022
Federal departments have been shifting to a hybrid system—some office time mixed with continued remote work—but Treasury Board President Mona Fortier, pictured Nov. 16, 2021, arriving for a cabinet meeting in the West Block, is leaving it to individual departments and agencies to determine the blend. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 10, 2022
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | January 10, 2022
Federal departments have been shifting to a hybrid system—some office time mixed with continued remote work—but Treasury Board President Mona Fortier, pictured Nov. 16, 2021, arriving for a cabinet meeting in the West Block, is leaving it to individual departments and agencies to determine the blend. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 20, 2021
Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller’s leadership ambitions, if they even exist, exist primarily in the realm of idle speculation, particularly since Trudeau’s successor has already been anointed by many Liberals and media: Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 20, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 20, 2021
Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller’s leadership ambitions, if they even exist, exist primarily in the realm of idle speculation, particularly since Trudeau’s successor has already been anointed by many Liberals and media: Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 6, 2021
The Emissions Reduction Fund, as originally conceived, was clearly a Liberal bail-out to oil and gas, dressed up as a win-win; introduced in April 2020, near the start of the pandemic, as a way of addressing soaring unemployment in Alberta while cleaning up the environment. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 6, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | December 6, 2021
The Emissions Reduction Fund, as originally conceived, was clearly a Liberal bail-out to oil and gas, dressed up as a win-win; introduced in April 2020, near the start of the pandemic, as a way of addressing soaring unemployment in Alberta while cleaning up the environment. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 22, 2021
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, pictured on Oct. 5, 2021, leaving the Conservative caucus meeting held in the Sir John A. Macdonald Building in Ottawa, is considered one of his party's stars in the House, known for his over-the-top style. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 22, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 22, 2021
Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, pictured on Oct. 5, 2021, leaving the Conservative caucus meeting held in the Sir John A. Macdonald Building in Ottawa, is considered one of his party's stars in the House, known for his over-the-top style. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 8, 2021
Anti-vaxxers' signs, pictured in White Rock, B.C., in 2021. Time to stop rewarding the refuseniks. Time to start governing for the reasonable, rather than catering to an unhinged rump. Call their bluff, writes Susan Riley. Photograph courtesy of Flickr/Ted McGrath
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 8, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | November 8, 2021
Anti-vaxxers' signs, pictured in White Rock, B.C., in 2021. Time to stop rewarding the refuseniks. Time to start governing for the reasonable, rather than catering to an unhinged rump. Call their bluff, writes Susan Riley. Photograph courtesy of Flickr/Ted McGrath
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 25, 2021
For most of his time in office, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Oct. 21, 2021, in Ottawa, has tacitly supported a too-leisurely transition away from oil and gas, pushing climate action in speeches while, at the same time, buying the Trans-Mountain expansion pipeline to ensure a continued, even accelerated, flow of oil from Alberta’s oil patch to Vancouver harbour, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 25, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 25, 2021
For most of his time in office, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Oct. 21, 2021, in Ottawa, has tacitly supported a too-leisurely transition away from oil and gas, pushing climate action in speeches while, at the same time, buying the Trans-Mountain expansion pipeline to ensure a continued, even accelerated, flow of oil from Alberta’s oil patch to Vancouver harbour, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 11, 2021
Hailed by Quebec Premier François Legault, pictured Sept. 18, 2020, as 'the biggest export agreement in the history of Quebec,' the sale is a logical fit: Quebec has a surplus of clean electricity, while nearby U.S. states are under political and economic pressure to cut emissions by moving away from coal-generated electricity, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 11, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | October 11, 2021
Hailed by Quebec Premier François Legault, pictured Sept. 18, 2020, as 'the biggest export agreement in the history of Quebec,' the sale is a logical fit: Quebec has a surplus of clean electricity, while nearby U.S. states are under political and economic pressure to cut emissions by moving away from coal-generated electricity, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 27, 2021
Justin Trudeau, Erin O'Toole, Jagmeet Singh, Yves-François Blanchet, Annamie Paul, and Maxime Bernier. It remains to be seen, whether campaign 2021 will be transformational in another way, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photographs by Sam Garcia and Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 27, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | September 27, 2021
Justin Trudeau, Erin O'Toole, Jagmeet Singh, Yves-François Blanchet, Annamie Paul, and Maxime Bernier. It remains to be seen, whether campaign 2021 will be transformational in another way, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photographs by Sam Garcia and Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 23, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has come under fire for triggering a snap election. For most Canadians, an election is a minor inconvenience, and an important chance to have their say on how their country is governed, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 23, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 23, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has come under fire for triggering a snap election. For most Canadians, an election is a minor inconvenience, and an important chance to have their say on how their country is governed, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 2, 2021
Green Party Leader Annamie Paul, pictured March 11, 2021, on the Hill. While Ms. Paul is an articulate and intelligent debater, intent on expanding her party’s reach in urban ridings and among racialized communities—all good things—her focus on other issues, including a recent anti-Semitism conference and a roundtable on illicit drugs, leaves climate issues in the dust, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 2, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | August 2, 2021
Green Party Leader Annamie Paul, pictured March 11, 2021, on the Hill. While Ms. Paul is an articulate and intelligent debater, intent on expanding her party’s reach in urban ridings and among racialized communities—all good things—her focus on other issues, including a recent anti-Semitism conference and a roundtable on illicit drugs, leaves climate issues in the dust, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 12, 2021
Senators Bernadette Clement, Paula Simons, and Mary Jane McCallum. As Justin Trudeau ticks off items on his to-do list in the weeks leading to the election, there is one accomplishment that may have escaped most voters’ notice. Indirectly—if not inadvertently—he has improved the quality of Canada’s Senate. Photographs courtesy of Facebook, Senate, and The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 12, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | July 12, 2021
Senators Bernadette Clement, Paula Simons, and Mary Jane McCallum. As Justin Trudeau ticks off items on his to-do list in the weeks leading to the election, there is one accomplishment that may have escaped most voters’ notice. Indirectly—if not inadvertently—he has improved the quality of Canada’s Senate. Photographs courtesy of Facebook, Senate, and The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 28, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 22, 2021, at the Rideau Cottage in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick/POOL
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 28, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 28, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured June 22, 2021, at the Rideau Cottage in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick/POOL
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 14, 2021
People performing a drumming circle, June 3, 2021, on Parliament Hill to honour the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found last month near the Kamloops Residential School in British Columbia. Meanwhile, the government that resolved to address longstanding injustice towards First Nations—that declared the Indigenous-settler relationship its top priority—is fighting repeated orders from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to end the discrimination against First Nations children who cannot access the same quality health and social services as non-Indigenous kids. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 14, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | June 14, 2021
People performing a drumming circle, June 3, 2021, on Parliament Hill to honour the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found last month near the Kamloops Residential School in British Columbia. Meanwhile, the government that resolved to address longstanding injustice towards First Nations—that declared the Indigenous-settler relationship its top priority—is fighting repeated orders from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal to end the discrimination against First Nations children who cannot access the same quality health and social services as non-Indigenous kids. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 31, 2021
Filmmaker Avi Lewis, centre, has been nominated to run for the NDP in B.C., five years after causing a ruckus in the party over his Leap Manifesto. The Hill Times file photograph
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 31, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 31, 2021
Filmmaker Avi Lewis, centre, has been nominated to run for the NDP in B.C., five years after causing a ruckus in the party over his Leap Manifesto. The Hill Times file photograph
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 17, 2021
It is extremely hard to believe that Justin Trudeau was ignorant of allegations of sexual misconduct directed at former Canadian Forces chief, Jonathan Vance, earlier this year. But that is the prime minister’s story and he is sticking to it, no matter how many other reputations are harmed in the process, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 17, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 17, 2021
It is extremely hard to believe that Justin Trudeau was ignorant of allegations of sexual misconduct directed at former Canadian Forces chief, Jonathan Vance, earlier this year. But that is the prime minister’s story and he is sticking to it, no matter how many other reputations are harmed in the process, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 3, 2021
Ontario Premier Doug Ford, pictured Sept. 18, 2020, in Ottawa. The Ford government's belated, timid, half-measure on paid sick leave, embraced reluctantly, is being marketed as a 'game-changer,' 14 months and 8,000 Ontario lives later, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 3, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | May 3, 2021
Ontario Premier Doug Ford, pictured Sept. 18, 2020, in Ottawa. The Ford government's belated, timid, half-measure on paid sick leave, embraced reluctantly, is being marketed as a 'game-changer,' 14 months and 8,000 Ontario lives later, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 19, 2021
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has been a prime offender, criticizing the federal government for not providing enough vaccines, then, when vaccines did arrive last week, boasting about how quickly and efficiently Albertans will be inoculated. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 19, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 19, 2021
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has been a prime offender, criticizing the federal government for not providing enough vaccines, then, when vaccines did arrive last week, boasting about how quickly and efficiently Albertans will be inoculated. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 5, 2021
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage, pictured in a scrum on May 2, 2019, in the Senate Building in Ottawa, after appearing before the Senate's Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 5, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | April 5, 2021
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage, pictured in a scrum on May 2, 2019, in the Senate Building in Ottawa, after appearing before the Senate's Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 22, 2021
MPs, pictured May 13, 2020, in the House Chamber. Does anyone miss that riveting exchange of insults, half-truths, and fake outrage known as Question Period? Conversely, does anyone secretly enjoy the relative quiet that has descended on Parliament Hill in these pandemic times, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 22, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 22, 2021
MPs, pictured May 13, 2020, in the House Chamber. Does anyone miss that riveting exchange of insults, half-truths, and fake outrage known as Question Period? Conversely, does anyone secretly enjoy the relative quiet that has descended on Parliament Hill in these pandemic times, writes Susan Riley. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 8, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured March 3, 2021, in Ottawa. Effective communication, especially in the social media era, requires humility, humour and clarity. Instead, federal spokespeople—following the example of a leaden-footed prime minister—frequently deliver overly cautious and, ultimately, empty messages about everything from vaccines, to economic recovery. Even when this prime minister has nothing to hide, he manages to look shifty, writes Susan Riley.
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 8, 2021
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | March 8, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured March 3, 2021, in Ottawa. Effective communication, especially in the social media era, requires humility, humour and clarity. Instead, federal spokespeople—following the example of a leaden-footed prime minister—frequently deliver overly cautious and, ultimately, empty messages about everything from vaccines, to economic recovery. Even when this prime minister has nothing to hide, he manages to look shifty, writes Susan Riley.
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 22, 2021
On his right flank, Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole, pictured Feb. 18, 2021, also has to beware of noisy critics like Maxime Bernier and the new, Western-based, right-wing Maverick Party, led by former Conservative MP Jay Hill. As well, social conservatives organized by Derek Sloan and others are competing for a significant presence at that upcoming policy conference and they are no friends of O’Toole’s, who some describe as Liberal-lite. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY SUSAN RILEY | February 22, 2021