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Friday, December 2, 2022
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Douglas Roche

Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 31, 2022
Cesar Jaramillo, a 45-year-old political refugee from Colombia, last week guided a high-powered policy conference on new ways to build global security out of the Ukraine war. Photograph courtesy of Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 31, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 31, 2022
Cesar Jaramillo, a 45-year-old political refugee from Colombia, last week guided a high-powered policy conference on new ways to build global security out of the Ukraine war. Photograph courtesy of Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 12, 2022
The possibility of Russia’s use of nuclear weapons in the Ukraine war has led to comparisons with the Cuban Missile Crisis 60 years ago this month, in which, for 13 days, humanity stood on the brink of World War III. The crisis passed because U.S. president John F. Kennedy, left, and Soviet Union president Nikita Khrushchev, right, engaged in crisis diplomacy and negotiated a solution to the problem of the Soviets installing nuclear missiles in Cuba. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 12, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 12, 2022
The possibility of Russia’s use of nuclear weapons in the Ukraine war has led to comparisons with the Cuban Missile Crisis 60 years ago this month, in which, for 13 days, humanity stood on the brink of World War III. The crisis passed because U.S. president John F. Kennedy, left, and Soviet Union president Nikita Khrushchev, right, engaged in crisis diplomacy and negotiated a solution to the problem of the Soviets installing nuclear missiles in Cuba. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 22, 2022
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres is currently preparing a paper, 'A New Agenda for Peace,' which will be published next year as part of the run-up to the UN Summit for the Future in 2024. Give the man credit for at least trying to build an agenda that prevents future wars, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 22, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 22, 2022
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres is currently preparing a paper, 'A New Agenda for Peace,' which will be published next year as part of the run-up to the UN Summit for the Future in 2024. Give the man credit for at least trying to build an agenda that prevents future wars, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 5, 2022
The Western states blamed Russia and Vladimir Putin's war on Ukraine for the failed Non-Proliferation Treaty conference. Yet to leave the matter squarely on the doorstep of Russia would be a gross distortion. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 5, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 5, 2022
The Western states blamed Russia and Vladimir Putin's war on Ukraine for the failed Non-Proliferation Treaty conference. Yet to leave the matter squarely on the doorstep of Russia would be a gross distortion. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | August 10, 2022
Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, left, Defence Minister Anita Anand, and Canadian Ambassador Leslie Norton. Despite the enormous danger to the world from the aggressive nuclear modernization programs of the nuclear powers, who intend to spend billions of dollars to retain their nuclear arsenals for the rest of this century, the Canadian government still refuses to support comprehensive, time-bound negotiations for the elimination of nuclear weapons, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade, and courtesy Flickr, and Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | August 10, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | August 10, 2022
Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, left, Defence Minister Anita Anand, and Canadian Ambassador Leslie Norton. Despite the enormous danger to the world from the aggressive nuclear modernization programs of the nuclear powers, who intend to spend billions of dollars to retain their nuclear arsenals for the rest of this century, the Canadian government still refuses to support comprehensive, time-bound negotiations for the elimination of nuclear weapons, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade, and courtesy Flickr, and Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 18, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured May 30, in Ottawa. Does anybody care that the world’s only surviving multilateral nuclear weapons treaty—the one designed to stop the spread of nuclear weapons around the world—is on the verge of collapse, writes Douglas Roche.   The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 18, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 18, 2022
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured May 30, in Ottawa. Does anybody care that the world’s only surviving multilateral nuclear weapons treaty—the one designed to stop the spread of nuclear weapons around the world—is on the verge of collapse, writes Douglas Roche.   The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 27, 2022
Canadian Senator Marilou McPhedran, and two interns, Rooj Ali, left, and Sarah Rohleder, protested against the absence of Canada at the first meeting of the states parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Vienna June 21-23. The Hill Times photograph by Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 27, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 27, 2022
Canadian Senator Marilou McPhedran, and two interns, Rooj Ali, left, and Sarah Rohleder, protested against the absence of Canada at the first meeting of the states parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Vienna June 21-23. The Hill Times photograph by Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 9, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured May 9, 2022, at the 2022 Victory Parade in Red Square, Moscow, to mark the 77th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. On March 2, 2022, the UN General Assembly, by a vote of 141-5-35, adopted a resolution demanding the Russian Federation immediately end its invasion of Ukraine and unconditionally withdraw all its military forces. The vote condemning Russian aggression clearly showed Russia's isolation from the rest of the international community. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 9, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 9, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured May 9, 2022, at the 2022 Victory Parade in Red Square, Moscow, to mark the 77th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. On March 2, 2022, the UN General Assembly, by a vote of 141-5-35, adopted a resolution demanding the Russian Federation immediately end its invasion of Ukraine and unconditionally withdraw all its military forces. The vote condemning Russian aggression clearly showed Russia's isolation from the rest of the international community. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 25, 2022
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, pictured, should step up his leadership on the crisis in the Ukraine war, writes Doug Roche. ‘It takes a strong leader to overcome the intimidation tactics of Washington and Moscow. Guterres is not that leader. However, the moral power of the entire UN is of greater consequence than the characteristics of any secretary general.’ Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 25, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 25, 2022
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, pictured, should step up his leadership on the crisis in the Ukraine war, writes Doug Roche. ‘It takes a strong leader to overcome the intimidation tactics of Washington and Moscow. Guterres is not that leader. However, the moral power of the entire UN is of greater consequence than the characteristics of any secretary general.’ Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 30, 2022
Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly has said Canada is not a nuclear power, but a middle power that is good at convening, fostering diplomacy, and influencing other countries to act in the interest of peace. The Hill Times Photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 30, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 30, 2022
Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly has said Canada is not a nuclear power, but a middle power that is good at convening, fostering diplomacy, and influencing other countries to act in the interest of peace. The Hill Times Photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 18, 2022
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, at Ādaži Military Base together with the President of Latvia Egils Levits, left, Canada's Minister of Defence Anita Anand and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on March 8, 2022. Stoltenberg is calling for 'major investments' from NATO partners as it draws up plans for a significantly larger long-term deployment of Western forces in Eastern Europe. Photograph courtesy of NATO/Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 18, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 18, 2022
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, at Ādaži Military Base together with the President of Latvia Egils Levits, left, Canada's Minister of Defence Anita Anand and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on March 8, 2022. Stoltenberg is calling for 'major investments' from NATO partners as it draws up plans for a significantly larger long-term deployment of Western forces in Eastern Europe. Photograph courtesy of NATO/Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 17, 2022
Defence Minister Anita Anand, pictured Feb. 22, 2022, at a press conference on the Hill. It’s a safe bet Canada’s defence spending will get a huge boost in the federal budget soon to be presented to Parliament. Anand, reeling from the demands of the Ukraine war, is openly campaigning for more money and will present 'aggressive options' to cabinet, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 17, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 17, 2022
Defence Minister Anita Anand, pictured Feb. 22, 2022, at a press conference on the Hill. It’s a safe bet Canada’s defence spending will get a huge boost in the federal budget soon to be presented to Parliament. Anand, reeling from the demands of the Ukraine war, is openly campaigning for more money and will present 'aggressive options' to cabinet, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 7, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured Jan. 10, 2022. Far from closing down the little that remains of nuclear disarmament agreements because of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, this seminal moment in the history of the 21st century must be seized, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 7, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | March 7, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured Jan. 10, 2022. Far from closing down the little that remains of nuclear disarmament agreements because of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, this seminal moment in the history of the 21st century must be seized, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 28, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured. The Russian president is displaying all the hallmarks of unleashed grievance. You don’t have to be a psychiatrist to see a tormented mind giving orders for full attack if he is thwarted from taking over Ukraine, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 28, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 28, 2022
Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured. The Russian president is displaying all the hallmarks of unleashed grievance. You don’t have to be a psychiatrist to see a tormented mind giving orders for full attack if he is thwarted from taking over Ukraine, writes Doug Roche. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 11, 2022
Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly, pictured Feb. 8, 2022, on the Hill. The Prohibition Treaty is already having an effect on world politics. Recently, the five major nuclear weapons states—the U.S., Russia, the U.K., France and China—issued a joint statement reaffirming that 'a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought,' writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 11, 2022
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 11, 2022
Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly, pictured Feb. 8, 2022, on the Hill. The Prohibition Treaty is already having an effect on world politics. Recently, the five major nuclear weapons states—the U.S., Russia, the U.K., France and China—issued a joint statement reaffirming that 'a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought,' writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 22, 2021
Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith, left, Bloc Québécois MP Alexis Brunelle-Duceppe, NDP MP Heather McPherson, and Green MP Elizabeth May all signed Doug Roche's statement of principle. He sent the statement to five Members of Parliament from five different parties, and noted that if they signed, there would be no implication they were speaking for their party, just exercising their right as a Member of Parliament to express views. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade, Sam Garcia and courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 22, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 22, 2021
Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith, left, Bloc Québécois MP Alexis Brunelle-Duceppe, NDP MP Heather McPherson, and Green MP Elizabeth May all signed Doug Roche's statement of principle. He sent the statement to five Members of Parliament from five different parties, and noted that if they signed, there would be no implication they were speaking for their party, just exercising their right as a Member of Parliament to express views. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade, Sam Garcia and courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 4, 2021
Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, left, and Bob Rae. Can Garneau actually break through the stranglehold his own government has put on key security issues well identified by the UN? Why has Rae, the much-acclaimed Canadian ambassador to the UN who entered the post with bold statements of justice for the tragic numbers of refugees in the world and dramatic action for climate change, toned down his vision, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 4, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 4, 2021
Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, left, and Bob Rae. Can Garneau actually break through the stranglehold his own government has put on key security issues well identified by the UN? Why has Rae, the much-acclaimed Canadian ambassador to the UN who entered the post with bold statements of justice for the tragic numbers of refugees in the world and dramatic action for climate change, toned down his vision, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 2, 2021
Members of the 6 Mobile Strike Force Kandak move into position during an exercise in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2013. Canadian troops withdrew from Afghanistan in 2014. Canadian Armed Forces photograph courtesy of Sgt. James Funk
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 2, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 2, 2021
Members of the 6 Mobile Strike Force Kandak move into position during an exercise in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2013. Canadian troops withdrew from Afghanistan in 2014. Canadian Armed Forces photograph courtesy of Sgt. James Funk
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 22, 2021
What do Mary Robinson, Jimmy Carter, Ban Ki-moon, Juan Manuel Santos, and Zeid Raad Hussein have in common? They are all members of the Elders, an independent group of former global leaders using their experience to press today’s governments to smarten up on peace, justice, and human rights. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikimedia and Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 22, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 22, 2021
What do Mary Robinson, Jimmy Carter, Ban Ki-moon, Juan Manuel Santos, and Zeid Raad Hussein have in common? They are all members of the Elders, an independent group of former global leaders using their experience to press today’s governments to smarten up on peace, justice, and human rights. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikimedia and Flickr
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 18, 2021
You might think that Alberta’s 33 Conservative MPs would overwhelm the NDP’s Heather McPherson, pictured, the only non-Conservative Alberta MP, but it’s quite the other way around, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 18, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 18, 2021
You might think that Alberta’s 33 Conservative MPs would overwhelm the NDP’s Heather McPherson, pictured, the only non-Conservative Alberta MP, but it’s quite the other way around, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 16, 2021
It is Chrystia Freeland who is responsible for giving credence to the idea that Canada’s defence spending must increase, thanks to a 2017 speech in Parliament, when she was foreign minister, where she praised 'military power in defence of our principles and our alliances,’ writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 16, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 16, 2021
It is Chrystia Freeland who is responsible for giving credence to the idea that Canada’s defence spending must increase, thanks to a 2017 speech in Parliament, when she was foreign minister, where she praised 'military power in defence of our principles and our alliances,’ writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 7, 2021
Austria’s Alexander Kmentt says that Canada, by attending the first meeting of the states party to the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons next year as an observer could signal that nuclear weapons are not ‘a sustainable security policy in the long run,’ writes Douglas Roche. Photograph courtesy of Flickr/Friends of Europe
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 7, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 7, 2021
Austria’s Alexander Kmentt says that Canada, by attending the first meeting of the states party to the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons next year as an observer could signal that nuclear weapons are not ‘a sustainable security policy in the long run,’ writes Douglas Roche. Photograph courtesy of Flickr/Friends of Europe
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | January 18, 2021
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres hailed the treaty as 'historic,' adding that it 'form an important component of the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime,' and set a new global norm against nuclear weapons. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | January 18, 2021
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | January 18, 2021
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres hailed the treaty as 'historic,' adding that it 'form an important component of the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime,' and set a new global norm against nuclear weapons. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 30, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Oct. 23, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. In a subtle diplomatic move, the Government of Canada has ceased its opposition and now 'acknowledges' the reason for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which will enter into force on Jan. 22, 2021, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 30, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 30, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Oct. 23, 2020, at a press conference on the Hill. In a subtle diplomatic move, the Government of Canada has ceased its opposition and now 'acknowledges' the reason for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which will enter into force on Jan. 22, 2021, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 1, 2020
Bob Rae recently briefed the cabinet and presumably repeated to ministers what he said in his report: Canada’s response cannot be limited to amounts budgeted well before the pandemic, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 1, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 1, 2020
Bob Rae recently briefed the cabinet and presumably repeated to ministers what he said in his report: Canada’s response cannot be limited to amounts budgeted well before the pandemic, writes Douglas Roche. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 21, 2020
Lloyd Axworthy, Jean Chrétien, Bill Graham, John McCallum, John Manley, and John Turner all signed an open letter, released on Sept. 21, that features 53 former high officials of NATO countries expressing support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. It is an astonishing rebuke of NATO’s moribund policies on nuclear weapons, and the most serious challenge to NATO’s nuclear orthodoxy in the organization’s 71-year history. Even two former NATO secretaries-general, Javier Solana and Willy Claes, as well as former UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon, joined in this protest. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade and Hill Times file photographs
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 21, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | September 21, 2020
Lloyd Axworthy, Jean Chrétien, Bill Graham, John McCallum, John Manley, and John Turner all signed an open letter, released on Sept. 21, that features 53 former high officials of NATO countries expressing support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. It is an astonishing rebuke of NATO’s moribund policies on nuclear weapons, and the most serious challenge to NATO’s nuclear orthodoxy in the organization’s 71-year history. Even two former NATO secretaries-general, Javier Solana and Willy Claes, as well as former UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon, joined in this protest. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade and Hill Times file photographs
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 29, 2020
The U.S. detonated two nuclear bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, killing between 129,000 and 226,000 people. We should stop talking about past culpability and concentrate on present responsibility. The debate is a diversion we cannot afford, writes Doug Roche. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 29, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 29, 2020
The U.S. detonated two nuclear bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, killing between 129,000 and 226,000 people. We should stop talking about past culpability and concentrate on present responsibility. The debate is a diversion we cannot afford, writes Doug Roche. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 8, 2020
Former senator Douglas Roche says that had Bob Rae, pictured in the National Press Theatre in 2018, been named Canada’s ambassador to the UN, as he suggested back in 2015, Canada would have had a successful bid for a seat on the UN Security Council. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 8, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | July 8, 2020
Former senator Douglas Roche says that had Bob Rae, pictured in the National Press Theatre in 2018, been named Canada’s ambassador to the UN, as he suggested back in 2015, Canada would have had a successful bid for a seat on the UN Security Council. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 22, 2020
Justin Trudeau, who quickly manifested a sense of entitlement and had the bad advice of a political coterie around him, had no real knowledge of how the UN works when his government put Canada's name forward for 2021-2022 UN Security Council. The prime minister was seen as an international star, but he unsuccessfully challenged Norway, which had announced its candidacy in 2007, and Ireland, which announced its candidacy in 2005, and are two staunch supporters of the wide range of UN programs. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 22, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 22, 2020
Justin Trudeau, who quickly manifested a sense of entitlement and had the bad advice of a political coterie around him, had no real knowledge of how the UN works when his government put Canada's name forward for 2021-2022 UN Security Council. The prime minister was seen as an international star, but he unsuccessfully challenged Norway, which had announced its candidacy in 2007, and Ireland, which announced its candidacy in 2005, and are two staunch supporters of the wide range of UN programs. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 1, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau co-chaired a UN meeting on May 28 on 'Financing for Development in Era of COVID-19 and Beyond.' Photograph by Evan Schneider, courtesy of the United Nations
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 1, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 1, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau co-chaired a UN meeting on May 28 on 'Financing for Development in Era of COVID-19 and Beyond.' Photograph by Evan Schneider, courtesy of the United Nations
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 6, 2020
UN Secretary-General António Guterres, pictured Jan. 20, 2018, recently said, 'The fury of the virus illustrates the folly of war,' and in one short sentence, opened the door to a new understanding of what constitutes human security. Photograph of the Kremlin
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 6, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | April 6, 2020
UN Secretary-General António Guterres, pictured Jan. 20, 2018, recently said, 'The fury of the virus illustrates the folly of war,' and in one short sentence, opened the door to a new understanding of what constitutes human security. Photograph of the Kremlin
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 19, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau secured the support of Senegalese President Macky Sall in Canada’s bid for a UN Security Council seat on his recent trip to the country, but Canada’s backing of UN efforts towards nuclear disarmament would be a more worthy endeavour, writes Douglas Roche. Twitter photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 19, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 19, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau secured the support of Senegalese President Macky Sall in Canada’s bid for a UN Security Council seat on his recent trip to the country, but Canada’s backing of UN efforts towards nuclear disarmament would be a more worthy endeavour, writes Douglas Roche. Twitter photograph by Adam Scotti
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 12, 2020
U.S. President Donald Trump shows a newspaper headline during a Feb. 6 address at the White House, after being acquitted in the U.S. Senate Impeachment Trial. Douglas Roche writes that even though it was Trump on trial, much more was in the spotlight. White House photograph by D. Myles Cullen
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 12, 2020
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 12, 2020
U.S. President Donald Trump shows a newspaper headline during a Feb. 6 address at the White House, after being acquitted in the U.S. Senate Impeachment Trial. Douglas Roche writes that even though it was Trump on trial, much more was in the spotlight. White House photograph by D. Myles Cullen
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 9, 2019
Pope Francis, pictured back in 2014, directed the Holy See to be among the first to sign and ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted at the UN in 2017, writes Douglas Roche. Photograph courtesy of the UN/Eskinder Debebe
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 9, 2019
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 9, 2019
Pope Francis, pictured back in 2014, directed the Holy See to be among the first to sign and ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted at the UN in 2017, writes Douglas Roche. Photograph courtesy of the UN/Eskinder Debebe
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 3, 2019
Then-prime minister Joe Clark and Doug Roche, pictured in August 1979 in Africa. 'The best of Joe Clark that ought to be celebrated in today’s chaotic world,' writes Mr. Roche. Photograph courtesy of Doug Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 3, 2019
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 3, 2019
Then-prime minister Joe Clark and Doug Roche, pictured in August 1979 in Africa. 'The best of Joe Clark that ought to be celebrated in today’s chaotic world,' writes Mr. Roche. Photograph courtesy of Doug Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | May 22, 2019
Syed Hasrin Syed Hussin, chair of the Third Preparatory Committee for the 2020 Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) Review Conference, briefs reporters at the closing of the meeting on May 10 at the United Nations in New York. The NPT is the most important arms control and disarmament agreement, says former Senator Douglas Roche. United Nations photograph by Evan Schneider
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | May 22, 2019
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | May 22, 2019
Syed Hasrin Syed Hussin, chair of the Third Preparatory Committee for the 2020 Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) Review Conference, briefs reporters at the closing of the meeting on May 10 at the United Nations in New York. The NPT is the most important arms control and disarmament agreement, says former Senator Douglas Roche. United Nations photograph by Evan Schneider
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 6, 2019
A spokesperson for Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland has blamed Russia for the United States’ decision to pull out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty it had signed with Russia in 1987. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 6, 2019
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 6, 2019
A spokesperson for Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland has blamed Russia for the United States’ decision to pull out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty it had signed with Russia in 1987. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 27, 2018
Former Liberal Senator Roméo Dallaire, former Progressive Conservative prime minister Kim Campbell, and former PC MP and Independent Senator Douglas Roche pose together at the Parliament of the World’s Religions event earlier this month in Toronto. Photograph courtesy of Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 27, 2018
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | November 27, 2018
Former Liberal Senator Roméo Dallaire, former Progressive Conservative prime minister Kim Campbell, and former PC MP and Independent Senator Douglas Roche pose together at the Parliament of the World’s Religions event earlier this month in Toronto. Photograph courtesy of Douglas Roche
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 10, 2018
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured speaking to reporters at the National Press Theatre on May 31, are falling in line with nuclear-weapons states in rejecting the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted at the United Nations in 2017 by 122 states. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 10, 2018
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | October 10, 2018
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured speaking to reporters at the National Press Theatre on May 31, are falling in line with nuclear-weapons states in rejecting the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted at the United Nations in 2017 by 122 states. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
FeatureBY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 13, 2018
Liberal MP Greg Fergus gets in some alone time in the Library of Parliament in Centre Block. The Hill Times file photograph
FeatureBY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 13, 2018
FeatureBY DOUGLAS ROCHE | June 13, 2018
Liberal MP Greg Fergus gets in some alone time in the Library of Parliament in Centre Block. The Hill Times file photograph
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 14, 2018
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could at four upcoming international meetings lead a new chorus calling for action to reduce the dangers of nuclear violence, writes Doug Roche. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY DOUGLAS ROCHE | February 14, 2018