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Why terrorist movements seldom ever really go away

By Phil Gurski      

We fool only ourselves when we try to say that terrorism is defeated. Yes, groups may surrender or be effectively downgraded to the extent where they are no longer very effective in what they are trying to do. Ideas, however, are a different beast: they do not tend to lay down and give up as easily. There will always be those willing to kill and die for a cause. It would be wise to remember that.

The IRA terrorism may not be as rampant as it was decades ago, but it is still around. In fact, a car bomb exploded in Derry on Jan. 19. No one, thankfully, was killed or injured and the event was treated with a shrug by many people, if they even knew it took place. The group, which police think was behind the explosion, is called the New IRA, writes Phil Gurski. Image courtesy of CNN

OTTAWA—When we think of the major terrorist threats facing us today, we tend to think of phenomena like Islamist extremism (the Islamic State, al-Qaida, and the like). If we want to sound more avant-garde we might say far-right extremism (neo-Nazis, white supremacists, etc.). And if you want to sound positively Nostradamusian, you would say watch out for the wave of left-wing terrorism, driven by inaction over global warming and environmental degradation.

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