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Phil Gurski

Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 20, 2020
CSE chief Shelly Bruce, pictured April 8, 2019, at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa at a press conference to discuss cyber threats to Canada's democratic process. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 20, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 20, 2020
CSE chief Shelly Bruce, pictured April 8, 2019, at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa at a press conference to discuss cyber threats to Canada's democratic process. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 13, 2020
Shelly Bruce, a linguist and former intelligence analyst, leads Canada's codebreaking agency, the Communications Security Establishment. CSE, National Defence, and CSIS, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, are responsible for doing Canada's foreign intelligence work. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 13, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 13, 2020
Shelly Bruce, a linguist and former intelligence analyst, leads Canada's codebreaking agency, the Communications Security Establishment. CSE, National Defence, and CSIS, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, are responsible for doing Canada's foreign intelligence work. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured during one of the daily press conferences he held in front of Rideau Cottage, where he and his family live on the grounds of Rideau Hall, this spring. Mr. Trudeau was not home on July 2 when Manitoba man Corey Hurren forced his way onto the property with several guns, and made a threat against Mr. Trudeau. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured during one of the daily press conferences he held in front of Rideau Cottage, where he and his family live on the grounds of Rideau Hall, this spring. Mr. Trudeau was not home on July 2 when Manitoba man Corey Hurren forced his way onto the property with several guns, and made a threat against Mr. Trudeau. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
We cannot give in to China’s bullying with respect to Michael Spavor, left, and Michael Kovrig, who have been detained by Chinese authorities since December 2018. There must be a better way that uses diplomatic pressure, including that of our allies, and still follows the tenets of international law. We all know what happens when you kowtow to the local hoodlum, writes Phil Gurski. Photographs courtesy of Twitter and the International Crisis Group
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | July 6, 2020
We cannot give in to China’s bullying with respect to Michael Spavor, left, and Michael Kovrig, who have been detained by Chinese authorities since December 2018. There must be a better way that uses diplomatic pressure, including that of our allies, and still follows the tenets of international law. We all know what happens when you kowtow to the local hoodlum, writes Phil Gurski. Photographs courtesy of Twitter and the International Crisis Group
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 29, 2020
Ground Zero in New York City, after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centre complex in Lower Manhattan, conducted by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaida. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 29, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 29, 2020
Ground Zero in New York City, after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centre complex in Lower Manhattan, conducted by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaida. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 22, 2020
Canada, of course, was among the first to join the U.S. in sending troops to hunt down the actors behind the attacks in New York and Washington. Yes, progress has been made here and there but at what cost, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy of Department of National Defence
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 22, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 22, 2020
Canada, of course, was among the first to join the U.S. in sending troops to hunt down the actors behind the attacks in New York and Washington. Yes, progress has been made here and there but at what cost, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy of Department of National Defence
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 11, 2020
The Canadian Security Establishment building in Ottawa. The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a new requirement: information on this and other viruses that can wreak havoc on our economy and our lives, as we have all witnessed over the past few months. Solid, accurate intelligence on future outbreaks can help governments prepare in advance and perhaps lead to responses that were not as fly-by-night as those for the novel coronavirus, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy Eshko Timiou/Wikipedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 11, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 11, 2020
The Canadian Security Establishment building in Ottawa. The COVID-19 pandemic has given rise to a new requirement: information on this and other viruses that can wreak havoc on our economy and our lives, as we have all witnessed over the past few months. Solid, accurate intelligence on future outbreaks can help governments prepare in advance and perhaps lead to responses that were not as fly-by-night as those for the novel coronavirus, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy Eshko Timiou/Wikipedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 4, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured on May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee meeting on the Hill.
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 4, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 4, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured on May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee meeting on the Hill.
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 1, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee meeting on the Hill. The Hill Times file photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 1, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | June 1, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee meeting on the Hill. The Hill Times file photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 20, 2020
A U.S. Special Forces Soldier, pictured Sept. 5, 2016, attached to Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, waits for nightfall prior to starting a nighttime operation. Afghan special forces and Green Berets partnered for a month-long operation. Photograph courtesy of U.S. Army
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 20, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 20, 2020
A U.S. Special Forces Soldier, pictured Sept. 5, 2016, attached to Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, waits for nightfall prior to starting a nighttime operation. Afghan special forces and Green Berets partnered for a month-long operation. Photograph courtesy of U.S. Army
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 14, 2020
A memorial for the victims of Toronto's deadly van attack in 2018. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 14, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | May 14, 2020
A memorial for the victims of Toronto's deadly van attack in 2018. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
According to Privy Council President Dominic LeBlanc, the federal government is considering introducing legislation to make it an offence to knowingly spread misinformation that could harm people. And it is eliciting opposing views from MPs, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy of Facebook
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
According to Privy Council President Dominic LeBlanc, the federal government is considering introducing legislation to make it an offence to knowingly spread misinformation that could harm people. And it is eliciting opposing views from MPs, writes Phil Gurski. Photograph courtesy of Facebook
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
As an aside, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority and the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) have teamed up on the CIRA-Canadian Shield, a protected domain name system (DNS) service, that prevents Canadians from connecting to malicious websites that might infect their devices and steal their personal information. This is seen as even more necessary than normal, insofar as COVID-19 is opening the door to all kinds of malicious online actors, writes Phil Gurski. Image courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 27, 2020
As an aside, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority and the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) have teamed up on the CIRA-Canadian Shield, a protected domain name system (DNS) service, that prevents Canadians from connecting to malicious websites that might infect their devices and steal their personal information. This is seen as even more necessary than normal, insofar as COVID-19 is opening the door to all kinds of malicious online actors, writes Phil Gurski. Image courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 15, 2020
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and U.S. President Donald Trump, pictured in the Oval Office on March 14, 2017. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 15, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 15, 2020
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and U.S. President Donald Trump, pictured in the Oval Office on March 14, 2017. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 13, 2020
Demonstrators, pictured on Feb. 24, 2020, supporting the Wetʼsuwetʼen nation against the building of the Coastal Gasoline pipeline through their traditional territory march through downtown Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 13, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 13, 2020
Demonstrators, pictured on Feb. 24, 2020, supporting the Wetʼsuwetʼen nation against the building of the Coastal Gasoline pipeline through their traditional territory march through downtown Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 6, 2020
U.S. marines, pictured on Dec. 25, 2001, in Kandahar, Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 6, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | April 6, 2020
U.S. marines, pictured on Dec. 25, 2001, in Kandahar, Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 30, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee on May 13, 2019. CSIS is mandated to advise the government on the following threats, as outlined in the CSIS Act: espionage or sabotage; foreign-influenced activities that are clandestine or deceptive or involve a threat to any person; acts of serious violence against persons or property for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological objective; and acts that could lead to the destruction or overthrow by violence of, the constitutionally established system of Government in Canada. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 30, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 30, 2020
CSIS director David Vigneault, pictured at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee on May 13, 2019. CSIS is mandated to advise the government on the following threats, as outlined in the CSIS Act: espionage or sabotage; foreign-influenced activities that are clandestine or deceptive or involve a threat to any person; acts of serious violence against persons or property for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological objective; and acts that could lead to the destruction or overthrow by violence of, the constitutionally established system of Government in Canada. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 26, 2020
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair is a member of the government's cabinet committee on coronavirus. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 26, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 26, 2020
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair is a member of the government's cabinet committee on coronavirus. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 23, 2020
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured Sept. 17, 2019, at RCMP Headquarters in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 23, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 23, 2020
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured Sept. 17, 2019, at RCMP Headquarters in Ottawa. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 16, 2020
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured at the House Public Safety Committee on the Hill on May 13, 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 16, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 16, 2020
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured at the House Public Safety Committee on the Hill on May 13, 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 9, 2020
How can we allow this to take place? In my view, this activity constitutes a threat to the security and safety of this country, as stated in the CSIS Act, and I have no idea whether my former CSIS colleagues are on this, but to its credit, the RCMP is looking into the matter, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 9, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 9, 2020
How can we allow this to take place? In my view, this activity constitutes a threat to the security and safety of this country, as stated in the CSIS Act, and I have no idea whether my former CSIS colleagues are on this, but to its credit, the RCMP is looking into the matter, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 2, 2020
Ottawa Police officers, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 24, 2020, watching demonstrators who took to the streets to support the Wetʼsuwetʼen hereditary chiefs who are opposed to the $6.6-billion Coastal Gasoline pipeline through their traditional territory. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 2, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | March 2, 2020
Ottawa Police officers, pictured in Ottawa on Feb. 24, 2020, watching demonstrators who took to the streets to support the Wetʼsuwetʼen hereditary chiefs who are opposed to the $6.6-billion Coastal Gasoline pipeline through their traditional territory. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 24, 2020
India's Minister for External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, who paid an official two-day visit to Canada on Dec. 20, 2019. As he outlined in a piece for the National Post, he argued for a 'wider and deeper Indo-Canadian enterprise,' citing shared democratic values, pluralism, civil society and a market economy. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 24, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 24, 2020
India's Minister for External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, who paid an official two-day visit to Canada on Dec. 20, 2019. As he outlined in a piece for the National Post, he argued for a 'wider and deeper Indo-Canadian enterprise,' citing shared democratic values, pluralism, civil society and a market economy. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 17, 2020
The U.K. public is in an uproar and the Boris Johnson government is rushing through legislation to amend early release for terrorists Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 17, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 17, 2020
The U.K. public is in an uproar and the Boris Johnson government is rushing through legislation to amend early release for terrorists Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 10, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on Jan. 27, 2020, on the Hill, has directed the ministers of justice and public safety in their mandate letters to 'coordinate efforts to prosecute terror suspects to the fullest extent of the law' and create a new Office of Director of Terrorism Prosecutions. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 10, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 10, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on Jan. 27, 2020, on the Hill, has directed the ministers of justice and public safety in their mandate letters to 'coordinate efforts to prosecute terror suspects to the fullest extent of the law' and create a new Office of Director of Terrorism Prosecutions. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 3, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 3, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | February 3, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Those who work in national security and public safety do not profile, writes columnist Phil Gurski. Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Those who work in national security and public safety do not profile, writes columnist Phil Gurski. Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Starved peasants on a street in Kharkiv, 1933. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 20, 2020
Starved peasants on a street in Kharkiv, 1933. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 17, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 17, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 17, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 13, 2020
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and Naional Security Committee meeting. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 13, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 13, 2020
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured May 13, 2019, at the House Public Safety and Naional Security Committee meeting. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 2, 2020
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured on Dec. 6, 2019, in the Commons foyer speaking with reporters after Question Period. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 2, 2020
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | January 2, 2020
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured on Dec. 6, 2019, in the Commons foyer speaking with reporters after Question Period. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 16, 2019
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, on the Hill. It should come as a shock to no one that China, and more specifically Chinese influence in Canada, has been on the CSIS radar for some time, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 16, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 16, 2019
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, on the Hill. It should come as a shock to no one that China, and more specifically Chinese influence in Canada, has been on the CSIS radar for some time, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, in his new cabinet role, is expected to oversee the government's counterterrorism efforts. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, in his new cabinet role, is expected to oversee the government's counterterrorism efforts. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Canada's new Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured on the Hill on May 15, 2019. Governments have a variety of tools to confront terrorism. There are, of course, the ‘pointy ends’ of the stick, i.e., security intelligence and law enforcement agencies upon whom we rely to detect and prevent acts of terrorism. In Canada, those organizations, CSIS and the RCMP, serve us well, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 9, 2019
Canada's new Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured on the Hill on May 15, 2019. Governments have a variety of tools to confront terrorism. There are, of course, the ‘pointy ends’ of the stick, i.e., security intelligence and law enforcement agencies upon whom we rely to detect and prevent acts of terrorism. In Canada, those organizations, CSIS and the RCMP, serve us well, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 2, 2019
Liberal MP Catherine McKenna, pictured on Oct. 24, 2019, speaking to reporters about the vulgar slur spray-painted on her campaign office door, three after getting re-elected. The former federal environment minister is now the minister of infrastructure. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 2, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | December 2, 2019
Liberal MP Catherine McKenna, pictured on Oct. 24, 2019, speaking to reporters about the vulgar slur spray-painted on her campaign office door, three after getting re-elected. The former federal environment minister is now the minister of infrastructure. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 25, 2019
People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier, pictured on Oct. 7, 2019, arriving at the English-language televised leaders' debate in Gatineau, Que. Despite the party’s inability to send a single MP to Ottawa it did garner just shy of 300,000 votes (1.6 per cent of the total votes cast). The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 25, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 25, 2019
People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier, pictured on Oct. 7, 2019, arriving at the English-language televised leaders' debate in Gatineau, Que. Despite the party’s inability to send a single MP to Ottawa it did garner just shy of 300,000 votes (1.6 per cent of the total votes cast). The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 18, 2019
Don Cherry, right, and Ron MacLean. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 18, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 18, 2019
Don Cherry, right, and Ron MacLean. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 11, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 11, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 11, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 4, 2019
Abdulahi Hasan Sharif was found guilty of all charges laid against him in the 2017 Edmonton attacks on a police officer who was stabbed and four pedestrians run down by a U-Haul van. But was this possibly something a little more than an attempted murder? Is it possible that the motivation that underlay Sharif’s actions placed it, under the Canadian Criminal Code's provisions for terrorist activity, writes Phil Gurski. Screen capture courtesdy of Global News Edmonton
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 4, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | November 4, 2019
Abdulahi Hasan Sharif was found guilty of all charges laid against him in the 2017 Edmonton attacks on a police officer who was stabbed and four pedestrians run down by a U-Haul van. But was this possibly something a little more than an attempted murder? Is it possible that the motivation that underlay Sharif’s actions placed it, under the Canadian Criminal Code's provisions for terrorist activity, writes Phil Gurski. Screen capture courtesdy of Global News Edmonton
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 28, 2019
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on Oct. 23, 2019, after holding his first press conference since winning his second term in government on Monday, Oct. 21. There are many challenges facing Canadians and it will not be easy to prioritize them. Still, is it not important to ensure a secure environment for all of us? I think so and I hope the Liberals do as well, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 28, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 28, 2019
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on Oct. 23, 2019, after holding his first press conference since winning his second term in government on Monday, Oct. 21. There are many challenges facing Canadians and it will not be easy to prioritize them. Still, is it not important to ensure a secure environment for all of us? I think so and I hope the Liberals do as well, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 21, 2019
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, appearing at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 21, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 21, 2019
CSIS Director David Vigneault, pictured May 13, 2019, appearing at the House Public Safety and National Security Committee. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 7, 2019
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, and People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier. All in all, there is little need perhaps to have national security and public safety take centre stage in the lead-up to October. Even if we are not immune from threats, we are in a good space. And that is worth celebrating, irrespective of whom you vote for, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade Meade and Cynthia Münster
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 7, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 7, 2019
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, and People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier. All in all, there is little need perhaps to have national security and public safety take centre stage in the lead-up to October. Even if we are not immune from threats, we are in a good space. And that is worth celebrating, irrespective of whom you vote for, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade Meade and Cynthia Münster
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 3, 2019
People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier's year-old party has a tendency to attract individuals who inhabit the spectrum we associate with the far right, or white supremacist, or neo-Nazi or anti-fill-in-the-blank crowd, writes columnist Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 3, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | October 3, 2019
People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier's year-old party has a tendency to attract individuals who inhabit the spectrum we associate with the far right, or white supremacist, or neo-Nazi or anti-fill-in-the-blank crowd, writes columnist Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 30, 2019
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured on Sept. 17, 2019, in Ottawa at RCMP Headquarters, providing a short update on the matter related to the ongoing investigation, arrest and charges against Cameron Ortis. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 30, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 30, 2019
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured on Sept. 17, 2019, in Ottawa at RCMP Headquarters, providing a short update on the matter related to the ongoing investigation, arrest and charges against Cameron Ortis. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 23, 2019
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured Sept. 17, 2019, at RCMP headquarters in Ottawa, providing a short update on the matter related to the ongoing investigation, arrest, and charges against Cameron Ortis. Mr. Ortis may have compromised one or more of three things: sources, methods or ongoing operations. These are the crown jewels of intelligence and law enforcement agencies and must be protected at all costs. That they may have been leaked is not good, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 23, 2019
Opinion | BY PHIL GURSKI | September 23, 2019
RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki, pictured Sept. 17, 2019, at RCMP headquarters in Ottawa, providing a short update on the matter related to the ongoing investigation, arrest, and charges against Cameron Ortis. Mr. Ortis may have compromised one or more of three things: sources, methods or ongoing operations. These are the crown jewels of intelligence and law enforcement agencies and must be protected at all costs. That they may have been leaked is not good, writes Phil Gurski. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade