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Dominant reflex of security and intelligence network ‘to keep info as secret as possible,’ should ‘hardwire’ transparency into day-to-day work, say experts

By Mike Lapointe       

'If you’re going to have a true democracy, then one needs to open up different agencies to public scrutiny,' says Bessma Momani, professor of political science at the University of Waterloo and a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance and Innovation (CIGI).

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, left, and Rob Stewart, deputy minister of public safety Canada. Minister Blair was appointed to his role following former public safety minister Ralph Goodale's defeat in the 2019 election. Mr. Stewart was appointed to his role in Dec. 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade, photograph courtesy of the Government of Canada

Canada’s first ever National Security Transparency Advisory Group, given the job of advising the deputy minister of public safety and other government officials on how to fulfill the 2017 National Security Transparency Commitment, has recommended that Canada’s intelligence and security community should “hardwire” transparency into it’s day-to-day work—and that for “enhanced transparency to be sustainable, it must be institutionalized and routinized.”

Mike Lapointe

Mike Lapointe joined the The Hill Times in June 2019 and covers the federal public service, deputy ministers, the Privy Council Office, public service unions, the Phoenix pay system, the machinery of government, and the Parliament Hill media.
- mlapointe@hilltimes.com


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