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Twitter’s crackdown on Trump ‘a Band-Aid on a wound,’ say politicos

By Palak Mangat      

Liberal MP Ken Hardie, former broadcaster, says he doesn't want to see lawmakers or social media companies 'running rampant over free expression,' but there is a 'fine line' that needs to be walked that allows them to facilitate free expression 'that, at the very least, comes with accountability.'

NDP MP Brian Masse, pictured at top left in 2018, Liberal MP Ken Hardie, pictured at right in 2017, and Liberal MP John McKay, pictured at bottom left in 2019, all say the storming of the Capitol Building in Washington this month should lead lawmakers and social media companies to do some soul searching. The Hill Times file photographs

The de-platforming of outgoing U.S. President Donald Trump by various social media companies is akin to putting a Band-Aid on a wound and should prompt deep reflection about the conditions that led to the political violence in the U.S., say some politicians. Mr. Trump was impeached on Jan. 13 by the U.S. House of Representatives for a second time in his presidency, this time for inciting the violent insurrection against the Capitol. 

Palak Mangat

Palak Mangat is an online reporter with The Hill Times.
- pmangat@hilltimes.com


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