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When it comes to dissenting female MPs and dissenting white male MPs, Trudeau’s got a double standard, says former Grit MP Caesar-Chavannes

By Abbas Rana      

One-term former Liberal MP Celina Caesar-Chavannes talks to The Hill Times about her four years in federal politics and about her upcoming book, Can You Hear Me Now? How I Found My Voice and Learned to Live with Passion and Purpose. She says she's not ruling out a return to the Hill.

Celina Caesar-Chavannes, who represented the Ontario riding of Whitby from 2015 to 2019, is promoting her upcoming book, Can You Hear Me Now? How I Found My Voice and Learned to Live with Passion and Purpose, published by Penguin Random House Canada. Image courtesy of Celina Caesar-Chavannes

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has one set of rules for dissenting female MPs who suffer the consequences if they take a stand on their principles, and another for white male MPs who get away without facing any consequences, says outspoken former Black Liberal MP Celina Caesar-Chavannes who left the Liberal caucus and didn’t run in the last election after disagreeing with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s handling of the SNC-Lavalin scandal, among numerous other issues.

Abbas Rana

Abbas Rana is the assistant deputy editor of The Hill Times.
- arana@hilltimes.com


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