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‘Like a criminal’: Canada-U.S. asylum agreement has a human cost, refugee says

By Samantha Wright Allen      

The U.S. 'is not a safe country for refugees,’ says a woman who Canada turned away because she entered the U.S. first. Her case helped convince a Federal Court judge the SCTA should end, a ruling the feds are appealing.

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured outside a Liberal cabinet meeting in January, says the recent ruling striking down the Safe Third Country Agreement is being challenged by the feds to make clear the legal framework governing asylum law. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Five years ago, a woman fled her home in central Africa, arrived in the United States, and days later headed for the Canadian border to seek asylum. A political activist who’d witnessed election fraud, she feared for her life after the militia killed her cousin and another activist. The 29-year-old thought that was the worst she’d experience in her young life, but it was her treatment after Canadian officials turned her away to U.S. immigration in 2015 that years later brings her to tears.

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Pandemic reveals Canada’s access-to-information system in ‘a critical state,’ and need for ‘urgent’ resources, says top watchdog

Canada’s information commissioner dealt with a third fewer complaints due to COVID-19, even as some departments stopped fulfilling their legal obligations under the access act.

Centre Block reno, welcome centre construction pegged at upwards of $5-billion by PSPC, to finish by 2030-31

While PSPC anticipates construction work will be complete by 2030 or 2031, assistant deputy minister Rob Wright on June 17 noted it will be another year after that before the building is ready to be reoccupied.

As Liberals trumpet merits of NSICOP, opposition MPs want ‘supremacy of Parliament’ respected

News|By Neil Moss
The government failed to abide by an order of the House to turnover unredacted documents related to the firing of two scientists at a Winnipeg lab leading to a Conservative question of privilege.

NDP’s Qaqqaq says nearly two years as MP an ‘isolating’ experience, did not ‘belong’

In her June 15 farewell speech, Mumilaaq Qaqqaq castigated the House of Commons, calling the institution one that was ’created off the backs, trauma, and displacement of Indigenous people.’

‘This Chamber is a place of history and of decisions, good and sometimes not so good’: 12 MPs deliver farewell speeches to House

On June 15, 12 MPs gave their farewell speeches with it unclear whether Parliament will return in the fall or an election will stop them from appearing in the Chamber again.

Canada can do more to boost global vaccination rates, say advocates, despite G7 pledge

News|By Neil Moss
Canada's pledge of 100-million vaccine doses won't come at the expense of its domestic supply. 'Canadians may switch from vaccine envy to vaccine guilt,' says Nicolas Moyer.

Change is the word: Meet the seven candidates for AFN national chief

The Assembly of First Nations will elect a new national chief on July 7. Four men and three women are in the running, coming from First Nations communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario.

Community-centred, Indigenous approach needed for mental health in the North, say territory denizens

News|By Alice Chen
‘It’s not an academic pursuit anymore. These are real stories of real people,’ says Yukon Premier Sandy Silver, who notes the current per-capita approach 'does not work,' and makes them 'scramble to do more with less.'

New vision for National Press Building requested after years of decline

News|By Alice Chen
After years of bleeding media tenants due to short-term leases, rent hikes, and limited space, Parliamentary Press Gallery members want a new, collaborative relationship with the building's federal landlord.
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