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‘They are just buying time’: Lawyers weigh feds’ appeal of judgment suspending Canada-U.S. asylum agreement

By Samantha Wright Allen      

The appeal means the STCA is in place indefinitely, say lawyers who predict that the question of whether the agreement infringes Charter rights, as recently ruled, will ultimately be put to the Supreme Court to hear.

Independent Senator Mobina Jaffer, left, and NDP MP Jenny Kwan both say they’re disappointed by the Liberal government’s appeal, while Conservative MP Peter Kent says it's the right call after the government has failed on the refugee file. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade, file

The Liberal government’s appeal of a recent “damning” Federal Court decision striking down Canada’s 16-year asylum agreement with the United States is disappointing and will likely end up before the Supreme Court, say lawyers and a Senator who once practiced refugee law.

Samantha Wright Allen

Samantha Wright Allen is a reporter for The Hill Times.
- swallen@hilltimes.com


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