Home Page Election 2019 News Opinion Foreign Policy Politics Policy Legislation Lobbying Hill Life & People Hill Climbers Heard On The Hill Calendar Archives Classifieds
Hill Times Events Inside Ottawa Directory Hill Times Store Hill Times Careers The Wire Report The Lobby Monitor Parliament Now
Subscribe Free Trial Reuse & Permissions Advertising
Log In
A skeletal House of Commons Chamber hosts a meeting of the special COVID-19 committee on May 13. For the first time in history, on May 27, the House held hybrid sittings, with large screens set up to beam the faces of MPs appearing virtually. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

‘It’s been better than nothing at all’: MPs settle into Zoom sittings, though some say more room for increased oversight

While some MPs say the debate in the virtual sittings is 'livelier,' and heckling has diminished, one MP notes the theatrics of Parliament haven’t completely been shaken off.

Despite limited leverage, Canada has duty to mount full-throated condemnation of China’s national security law, say experts, Parliamentarians

News|By Beatrice Paez
'We can’t lose sight of the fact that Hong Kong has been a fabric of Canada, and we owe it to Hong Kongers to be very public about our opposition to what is taking place,' says Sen. Jim Munson.

U.S. academic who saw Trump victory in 2016 says president’s re-election bid in serious trouble

News|By Abbas Rana
‘The Radical Left Lamestream Media, together with their partner, the Do Nothing Democrats, are trying to spread a new narrative that President Trump was slow in reacting to Covid 19,’ says U.S. President Donald Trump in a tweet.

Politics This Morning

Get the latest news from The Hill Times

Politics This Morning


Your email has been added. An email has been sent to your address, please click the link inside of it to confirm your subscription.

Narrow focus to supporting ‘subpopulations,’ says expert, in preparation for second wave of the pandemic

News|By Palak Mangat
In recognition of how the pandemic is disproportionately affecting racialized communities, the feds' anti-racism secretariat has set up an taskforce to address inequities.

Online tool tracks more than 100 pandemic-related racism incidents since February

News|By Palak Mangat
The three more common types of harassment were verbal insults, denial of access to public areas, and intentional spitting or coughing. 

Canada’s next trade battle: consensus building at the WTO

News|By Neil Moss
A Global Affairs trade official told the House Committee on International Trade in March that Canada has had little engagement with the United States on reforming the WTO to date.

Health agency reveals race-based data guideline as calls grow for nation-wide collection 

‘Until we know where the discrepancies and inequities in health are, we can never tackle them,’ says the Alliance for Healthier Communities.

No ‘magic’ response: diplomats discuss international lessons learned from COVID-19

'We’re living a gigantic world-wide experiment of geology, economy, and psychology, and we will only know later what happened,' says German Ambassador Sabine Sparwasser.

MacKay leadership camp touts strength in numbers

Former MP Alex Nuttall is Peter MacKay’s campaign manager, with ex-Ford aide Michael Diamond as his deputy, and veteran staffer William Stairs acting as a key adviser.

Post-pandemic world presents real opportunity to change U.S.-Canada relationship, experts say

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages and the American election gets closer, Canadian foreign policy experts weigh in on how the pandemic has affected bilateral relations, and where we go from here.
A skeletal House of Commons Chamber hosts a meeting of the special COVID-19 committee on May 13. For the first time in history, on May 27, the House held hybrid sittings, with large screens set up to beam the faces of MPs appearing virtually. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

‘It’s been better than nothing at all’: MPs settle into Zoom sittings, though some say more room for increased oversight

While some MPs say the debate in the virtual sittings is 'livelier,' and heckling has diminished, one MP notes the theatrics of Parliament haven’t completely been shaken off.

Virus-hounded Trump digs in for most ugly, unpredictable electoral free-for-all ever

Opinion|By Les Whittington
With Donald Trump’s future in doubt after Nov. 3, the president’s approach is degenerating into an implacable embrace of ugly, unhinged, and extremist behaviour.

Party leaders putting party staffers in dicey position by taking wrong-smelling wage subsidy

Opinion|By Tim Powers
Taking CEWS is not the great equalizer for Canada’s federal political parties—it does not make them like the rest of us or preserve their place as key Canadian institutions.

Dalphond’s exit from ISG watershed moment for Trudeau’s experiment with Senate modernization

Opinion
The point of institutional reform was not to continue the rule of fear and favour in the Senate, in forcing through decisions and doling out the goodies from the top. That is not reform. That is regression.

Pandemic crisis tests durability of MPs’ parliamentary privileges, say MPs, experts

News|By Beatrice Paez
Conservative MP Marilyn Gladu says MPs have little recourse, other than to file a complaint with the House Speaker, for raising concerns about breaches of privilege.

Budget 2020, election promises in question amid COVID-19 global pandemic crisis, say McKay, Delacourt

‘It is going to blow a hole in the government’s legislative agenda,’ says Liberal MP John McKay.

COVID-19 bailout bill passes after late-night negotiations on new government powers

What was supposed to be a quick, co-operative sitting of the House turned into a negotiating stalemate for hours on Nov. 24 and Nov. 25.

Trudeau’s move to co-host UN meeting on pandemic elevates bid for Security Council seat

Opinion|By
Canada needs this uplift in visibility of commitment to UN values because a petition is making the rounds in Canada against Canada’s election to the Security Council for alleged international 'bad behaviour.'

What’s good for the Venezuela goose should be good for the U.S. gander

Opinion|By Scott Taylor
Chrystia Freeland should assemble the Lima Group and recognize Barack Obama as the interim acting U.S. president until their election in November.

China is hardening, not softening, and we should be concerned

Opinion|By Andrew Caddell
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been loath to criticize Beijing for its long list of offences because he knows the key to getting a Security Council seat next month depends on Chinese influence.

Environment, resource development agenda among April’s top-lobbied files

‘Deep change is possible and it can happen fast,’ says the CEO of Ocean Wise Conservation Association, which helped push the Environment Minister among the most-lobbied in cabinet in the last two months.

MPs claimed $230,000 in free travel from organizations, foreign governments in 2019

Taiwan was the most frequent— and expensive—destination, totalling $90,000 and making up 40 per cent of all claimed travel.

‘Pandemic bump’ pushes March lobbying up 60 per cent over last year

‘It’s been a season of virtual or e-lobby days for every single sector, all at the same time because the entire economy has been impacted,' says Yaroslav Baran. 

Paul Thomas named new director of Parliamentary Internship Programme

Feature|By Neil Moss
Plus, Stephen Harper places partial blame for his 2015 electoral defeat at the hands of Canadian media, and a webinar on the future of Canada-China relations will feature former envoy Guy Saint-Jacques.

Labour Minister Tassi now has a 15-member team

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Eight political staffers have joined the labour minister’s office since late January, including a parliamentary affairs director, a communications assistant, and two new regional affairs advisers.

New aides for Ministers MacAulay, Hajdu

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Meanwhile, Alexander Steinhouse has been temporarily seconded to the Prime Minister’s Office to help with issues management work.

‘More Canadians are starting to get it’: outgoing Don Kelly reflects on two decades at Assembly of First Nations

Feature|By Neil Moss
Plus, former NDP staffer Carole Saab is named new CEO of Federation of Canadian Municipalities, and the Red Chamber and the University of Victoria will partner to bring a virtual forum on bridging divides.

‘A very difficult few weeks’: MPs pay tribute to Snowbirds fatal crash victim Jennifer Casey

Feature|By Neil Moss
Plus, Conservative pundit Rachel Curran joins Facebook's public policy group, and Bill Fox pens book on political communication in the post-truth age.

Senate playing catch-up on Centre Block renovation plans, but Red Chamber’s footprint to remain untouched

‘We’re going to get left behind if we don’t get up and running and voice our concerns and our issues quickly,’ says ISG Senator Sabi Marwah of design plans for Centre Block’s renovation.
The Hill Times' newsrooms take pride in delivering the dependable and in-depth news and analysis that decision-makers rely on. Download E-Edition

Unparalleled BoC bond purchasing welcomed to move country from ‘defence to offence,’ says Senator Loffreda

News|By Mike Lapointe
The Bank of Canada didn’t resort to bond buying during the last crisis, but the economic plunge is much deeper this time around, say economists.

America, Canada’s problem

Opinion|By Robert Bothwell
Unquestioning friendship to Canada survives in American public opinion and the 'deep state' of the American government, but at the topmost level of the U.S. administration it is no longer settled policy.

Defence spending likely to face post-COVID cuts, military experts say

The Liberal's defence policy, Strong, Secure and Engaged, could be in for post-pandemic trouble. Vance was in the military during the 1990s "decade of darkness" and could be around for another round of big cuts.

After the Great Lockdown, far-sighted global cooperation will be heralded and lauded as wise

Opinion
Long-term government budgets will need massive amounts of public money to boost recovery in critical sectors such as basic income, development, education, employment, energy, and health.

Canada remains deeply engaged in the Middle East

Opinion
Post COVID-19, the need for Canada to continue its engagement in the Middle East isn’t likely to abate, and the demand for our military expertise won’t fade away either.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured Jan. 17, 2020, with David Morrison, his defence policy adviser, shortly before holding a press conference and an update at the National Press Theatre on the downing of Flight PS752 tragedy. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Minority rules: 2020’s most influential figures to watch in federal politics

Feature
This year’s Top 100 Most Influential List reflects the power brokers who will help shape the terms of how this minority Parliament will shake out.
The return of Parliament is more than an event in the news cycle. It’s a time to look ahead, and to thoughtfully consider the important role each branch of government will play in that future, and in the life of each individual Canadian.
Opinion|David Coletto
Our worldview, our desire for control, and the way we get information are just three things that new MPs should consider as they orient themselves to life in Ottawa and as elected representatives. But the implications of these three forces matter to everyone who seeks to engage and connect with Canadians.
Annual Features
Contact list

Politics This Morning: Feds have duty to mount full-throated condemnation of China’s national security law, say experts, Parliamentarians

Plus, the UN Security Council is holding a debate on the elections. Canada's UN Ambassador Marc-André Blanchard will be squaring off against Ireland's Geraldine Byrne Nason and Mona Juul of Norway.
The Public Health Agency of Canada is looking for a company that can store and ship the government’s big orders of personal protective equipment amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
There will be a lot to learn from the policy experiment we are all living with because of COVID-19. The U.S.-Canada border has been managed co-operatively and well, but we have room to experiment and innovate.
'It's in the government's interest and in the country's interest to make the management of COVID an important priority, but not to set aside the other priorities,' says former Tory Senator Hugh Segal.
Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino says about 30,000 agriculture workers have arrived in Canada since the start of 2020.

Politics This Morning

Get the latest news from The Hill Times

Politics This Morning


Your email has been added. An email has been sent to your address, please click the link inside of it to confirm your subscription.
Opinion
Elections Canada readily admitted that there is no enabling legislative measure in Canada to deal with the holding of elections during emergencies and that now they are entering into 'uncharted' waters.
Opinion|Ian Waddell
Right now, China’s under a world of criticism for its early actions in the COVID-19 global crisis, and judging by its ambassadors’ statements in Europe, Australia, and Canada, it’s lashing out undiplomatically.
Opinion|W.A. Bogart
We can come out of this a better society or we can emerge awash in bitterness and rancour. Democracy is a door through which a people walk through. What’s on the other side is up to them.
Most regulators share the common goal of protecting the health and safety of their citizens. So why not accept the results of testing that trusted colleagues have already undertaken?
Opinion|Erica Ifill
Recovery without effective, equitable child care may result in a shrinking of the workforce, as more and more women may choose to opt out entirely because the burden is too great.
From a realist perspective, Canada’s long-term interests are guaranteed when its foreign policy is centered around multilateralism, which allows the country to capitalize on its soft power as complementary.

Flanagan documents how successful First Nations are achieving prosperity

The Wealth of First Nations, by Tom Flanagan, published by the Fraser Institute, is one of this year's five finalists for the prestigious Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year. Here's an excerpt.

Breakdown lays out a fulsome set of policy recommendations

Breakdown addresses arguably one of the most contentious and consequential set of policy issues facing Canada today—the nexus of resource development, climate change, Indigenous rights and Alberta alienation. It presents the history of four pipeline projects and overlays the political decisions that have resulted in many projects not being supported or being delayed significantly. It's also one of five books nominated for this year's prestigious Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year. This is an excerpt.

New press secretary in International Development Minister Gould’s office

Meanwhile, Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains recently bade farewell to his lead media contact, Véronique Simard.

Associate Finance Minister Fortier names Cheesbrough as policy director

Plus, there are a few more staff to note in Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland’s office, including special assistant for operations Stephen Bateman.
Feature|Neil Moss

Maple syrup, maple chocolate, maple lollipops: a look inside Canada’s gifts to UN diplomats

Plus, MPs take part in a health-care fundraiser on International Nurses Day, and the Supreme Court will resume hearings online in June.
Feature|Neil Moss

Liberal MP Kamal Khera joins nursing ranks after COVID-19 recovery

Plus, Senator Paula Simons has launched a five-part podcast on Albertan identity and culture, and Craig Dalton has departed the veterans ombudsman office after a year and a half.

As union members face COVID-19 pandemic ‘head on,’ PSAC calls for feds to return to bargaining table

Treasury Board spokesperson Martin Potvin says the government's goal is to take 'constructive steps to keep meeting and to prepare for negotiations when they resume.'

‘Critical situation’ in prisons as health-care workers threaten to walk over lack of protective equipment

'The Correctional Service of Canada continues to take a number of preventative measures to restrict the spread of COVID-19 in federal institutions,' according to the office of Public Safety Minister Bill Blair.

No more Hill parties, after coronavirus pandemic forces Parliament Hill to shut down

'Politics and the Pen is probably the exact opposite of social distancing. We cram so many people into the ballroom that you can barely keep one to two inches away,' says Jim Armour.  

Sorbara makes ’em howl at the Métropolitain

Pat Sorbara's new book, Let 'em Howl, offers lessons learned over a more than four-decade career in federal and provincial politics as a high-ranking Liberal backroomer.

Armenian Embassy moves commemorations online to mark 105 years since genocide 

Every year on April 24, the embassy participates in a march to remember the more than 1.5 million people who died during the First World War.

Embassies in Ottawa offer ‘around the clock’ support in the new work-from-home reality

Envoys comment on the ‘uncharted territory’ brought forward by the ‘dreadful ordeal’ COVID-19 brings, and urge co-operation in the global response.

Samara Centre for Democracy examines provincial parliaments in May 28 webinar

Wednesday, May 27th, 2020
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives for Question Period in West Block on May 25. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Tiff Macklem, the Bank of Canada's new governor, pictured on May 1 during an announcement on his appointment, is taking the helm as the country grapples with a deep recession triggered by the pandemic. The former senior deputy chief of the central bank, Mr. Macklem helped manage Canada's response to the 2008 recession from 2010-2014. He succeeds Stephen Poloz, whose seven-year term expires in June.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

The Hill Times file photograph
Your group subscription includes premium access to Politics This Morning briefing.