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Election

2019’s 47 tightest races, won by less than five per cent margins

By Samantha Wright Allen      

There were 47 seats decided by a less than five per cent margin, including 21 that switched parties hands.

LIberals fared the best in the country’s tightest races, team winning 26 of the 47 riding won by five per cent or less. Re-elected Liberal MPs among the nail biters included, Jean-Yves Duclos, left, Terry Beech, Larry Bagnell, and Diane Lebouthillier. The Hill Times photographs and file photographs by Andrew Meade

In the ridings secured by the slimmest margins, there were likely more Liberal candidates counting down the clock and vote counts on election night, where the Grits ultimately took 26 of the 47 seats won by less than five per cent.

Samantha Wright Allen

Samantha Wright Allen is a reporter for The Hill Times.
- swallen@hilltimes.com


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