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Increased foreign ownership limits may not lead to cheaper airfares, experts say, but its worthwhile anyway

By Neil Moss      

Foreign ownership limit increases are just one 'lever' to be used for greater commercial airline competition in Canada, says David Timothy Duval.

New Transport Canada regulations allow Canadian airlines to have 49 per cent foreign ownership. Air Canada has is seeking shareholder approval to increase its foreign ownership limit to the new maximum. Photograph courtesy of Flickr/BriYYZ

The increase of foreign ownership limits in Canadians airlines may not lead to more competition for commercial airliners and cheaper airfares for consumers, experts say, but added that there is no reason for the federal government not to increase the limit.

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