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The NDP’s unprecedented court battle with the House Board of Internal Economy continued last week, with the Federal Court of Appeal hearing arguments on whether or not two 2014 decisions by the board, ordering NDP MPs to repay roughly $4-million, are immune from judicial oversight. Reached by The Hill Times after the daylong hearing on Nov. 14, NDP lawyer Julius Grey, who along with James Duggan is representing NDP MPs in the case, said he thinks a decision

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News

NDP court battle with BOIE wages on, as Parliament fights to keep courts out

By Laura Ryckewaert      

The first-of-its-kind challenge of two 2014 rulings by the House Board of Internal Economy will set important legal precedent when it comes to the application and scope of parliamentary privilege protections in Canada.

House of Commons law clerk Philippe Dufresne, right, House Clerk Charles Robert, centre, and House Speaker Geoff Regan, left, pictured at a March 2018 meeting of the Commons Board of Internal Economy. An appeal by the BOIE seeking to have the Federal Court of Appeal overturn an October 2017 court ruling to hear an NDP challenge of two 2014 board decisions had its day in court on Nov. 14. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
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