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Current outcry over Huawei Canada’s R&D investments creates impression Chinese company’s doing something sinister, but it’s not

By David Crane      

Canada’s takeover of the Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5-billion, with another estimated $7.5-billion or more needed to twin the pipeline, is a dubious initiative for several reasons. But it showed Canada can act when it has to. Imagine if a similar amount of money had been available to really build up our own tech sector. The benefits would have been much greater. Instead, we have R&D branch plants.

Attracting such R&D branch plants is Canadian policy and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured last week on the Hill, has gone out of his way to court tech companies such as Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet/Google and Alibaba. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
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TORONTO—The current outcry over Huawei Canada’s research and development investments in Canada has created the impression that the Chinese company is doing something sinister here. In fact, it is only doing what Apple, Amazon, Alphabet/Google, Microsoft, IBM, Cisco, SAP, Samsung, General Motors, and Ford are doing here. All these companies are here because the Harper and Trudeau governments have wanted them here and they are all using Canadian talent and science programs to advance their own corporate interests.

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