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OTTAWA—Misogyny lives. And the internet is giving it too much oxygen. While Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is being called to account by governments around the world for political misuse of social media intel, a bigger issue looms in cyberspace. Normal platforms of discourse are governed by legal restraints which serve to cool down the rhetoric that can come from unfettered anonymity. Slander, libel and anti-hate laws serve to make people think before they speak, write or act. Not

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Opinion

Misogyny lives, and the internet is giving it too much oxygen

By Sheila Copps      

The only way to stop poison spewing from hate sites is to shut them down and deny the cover of anonymity to potential perpetrators. That would be a noble outcome of the horrific Toronto tragedy.

Toronto police Const. Ken Lam, right, pictured on April 23, confronting Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, Ont., who was arrested after a white van killed 10 and injured people on a busy stretch of Yonge Street in north Toronto. Screenshot
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