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OTTAWA—The erroneous warning about an impending nuclear missile attack on Hawaii Jan. 13 came with the reminder that any nuclear early-warning system is at best a fool’s game. The idea of a civilian early-warning system against a nuclear attack was debunked more than 60 years ago precisely because nuclear weapons have as their primary target the immediate destruction of large civilian populations. No ordinary citizen can expect to “take shelter” from a nuclear attack. The secondary and predictable

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Global

False Hawaii nuclear-attack alert came with a reminder

By Jim Creskey      

Any nuclear early warning system is at best a fool’s game.

Columnist Jim Creskey says Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could follow in the footsteps of his father, Pierre Trudeau, and take more action to further nuclear disarmament. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade, Rob Mieremet/Dutch national archives photograph
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