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Silver linings and steep fears over Monsanto-Bayer merger

By Denis Calnan      

Takeover could improve reputation of bio-tech companies in the agri-food industry, but could also shift costs to farmers and leave powerful intellectual property in the hands of few big businesses, experts say.

“I think its actually better for the entire industry to move forward on this deal. It would allow the industry to change its image a little bit,” said Prof. Charlebois, referring to the poor reputation Monsanto has for its role in Genetically Modified Organisms in the agriculture sector. Photograph courtesy of Waywuwei, Wikimedia Commons

The creation of a monolithic biotech company with the merger of Monsanto and Bayer could allow the industry to reinvent its negative image, but some say it is another step towards leaving bio-tech and genetics intellectual property in too few private hands, and could lead to higher input costs for farmers, say Canadian industry reps. The massive takeover is also just one of more mega-mergers on the horizon.

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Implementation of new NAFTA will be ‘important priority’ for Liberal government as U.S. negotiations progress

News|By Neil Moss
The U.S. chair of the House Agricultural Committee says he thinks the USMCA will be brought to the floor for a vote by the end of year.

Senator Diane Bellemare leaving role on government team in Red Chamber

Continuity key to speakership in minority Parliament, say politicos, contenders

News|By Beatrice Paez
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has a relatively 'comfortable' minority Parliament, and could survive with one fewer vote if the new Speaker is a Liberal, says Samara's Paul Thomas.

New Senate group eligible for $191,000 for rest of the year, but funding source up in the air 

Conservative Senators' questions over new Canadian Senators Group’s purpose are ‘sour grapes,’ says interim leader Senator Scott Tannas.

PIPSC to expand fight against government outsourcing, says union president

News|By Mike Lapointe
PIPSC president Debi Daviau says amount spent on outsourcing has increased ‘despite commitment by the government to reduce spending on external consultants to 2005 levels,’ at union’s annual general meeting.

‘This is different’: diplomats warned of divided Canada during parliamentary crash course

Given Canadians' self-professed preference for a minority government, 'I think we all are on probation,' Liberal MP Greg Fergus told diplomats.

Nearly 100 new MPs waiting until after cabinet reveal to move into offices

News|By Palak Mangat
The process of new MPs learning where their Ottawa offices will be will begin after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announces who will be making up his re-jigged cabinet on Nov. 20, the government whip said last week.

86 ridings in 40 days: Trudeau’s cross-country sprint may have given party an edge

News
While a whistle stop in a tight race can help tip the outcome, political experts say there are other factors at play in galvanizing the electorate.

As Conservatives squabble, governing Liberals trying to lay low for maximum political advantage, say Liberals

News|By Abbas Rana
The seven-hour Conservative caucus meeting on Nov. 6 was ‘intense,’ with ‘blunt’ criticism of the party’s campaign performance, say Conservative sources
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