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Timothy Choi

Nuclear or bust: Canadians face uncomfortable choice for new submarines

Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | November 17, 2021
Despite the Arctic’s growing geopolitical significance and increasing maritime traffic, the upgraded Victoria class have spent most of their limited sailing times this past decade in the Far East and West, not North, like the HMCS Chicoutimi—pictured in Scotland in 2005—which sailed to Japan in 2017-2018, from which it monitored North Korean sanctions, writes Timothy Choi. DND photograph by Cpl. Robert Bottrill
Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | November 17, 2021
Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | November 17, 2021
Despite the Arctic’s growing geopolitical significance and increasing maritime traffic, the upgraded Victoria class have spent most of their limited sailing times this past decade in the Far East and West, not North, like the HMCS Chicoutimi—pictured in Scotland in 2005—which sailed to Japan in 2017-2018, from which it monitored North Korean sanctions, writes Timothy Choi. DND photograph by Cpl. Robert Bottrill
Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | July 8, 2021
Canada is in the midst of a crucial procurement project to replace its fleet of Halifax-class frigates. Halifax-class HMCS Vancouver is pictured in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. While some commentators suggest Canada purchase ships from abroad, this would be a strategic folly: billions of dollars would be held up overseas to the goodwill of the contracted country for decades while the fleet is being built, writes Timothy Choi. Photograph courtesy of the U.S. Navy/Daniel L. Zink
Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | July 8, 2021
Opinion | BY TIMOTHY CHOI | July 8, 2021
Canada is in the midst of a crucial procurement project to replace its fleet of Halifax-class frigates. Halifax-class HMCS Vancouver is pictured in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. While some commentators suggest Canada purchase ships from abroad, this would be a strategic folly: billions of dollars would be held up overseas to the goodwill of the contracted country for decades while the fleet is being built, writes Timothy Choi. Photograph courtesy of the U.S. Navy/Daniel L. Zink