Friday, April 12, 2024
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Friday, April 12, 2024 | Latest Paper

Joseph Ingram

Joseph Ingram is a fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, a fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, chair of Capitalis Partners, a former president of the North South Institute, and a former special representative of the World Bank to the United Nations and the World Trade Organization. 

Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 4, 2024
Former Bank of Canada governor Mark Carney picked up the Club of Florence’s 2024 ‘Renewed Humanism’ award on March 20, and laid out a clear policy contrast to those who—often devoid of scientific or empirical evidence—advocate for the more authoritarian approach, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 4, 2024
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 4, 2024
Former Bank of Canada governor Mark Carney picked up the Club of Florence’s 2024 ‘Renewed Humanism’ award on March 20, and laid out a clear policy contrast to those who—often devoid of scientific or empirical evidence—advocate for the more authoritarian approach, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | February 14, 2024
Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, left, has hinted that he would be guided by much the same philosophy as former prime minister Stephen Harper. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | February 14, 2024
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | February 14, 2024
Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, left, has hinted that he would be guided by much the same philosophy as former prime minister Stephen Harper. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 11, 2023
If Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s, left, avoidance of the consequences of only three criminal charges can contribute to the chaos in the Middle East, we need to be equally concerned at what former U.S. president Donald Trump’s attempts to avoid 91 indictments will lead to, writes Joseph Ingram. White House photograph by D. Myles Cullen
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 11, 2023
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 11, 2023
If Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s, left, avoidance of the consequences of only three criminal charges can contribute to the chaos in the Middle East, we need to be equally concerned at what former U.S. president Donald Trump’s attempts to avoid 91 indictments will lead to, writes Joseph Ingram. White House photograph by D. Myles Cullen
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 13, 2023
Environment Minister Stephen Guilbeault speaks to reporters in Ottawa on June 15. The electorate will only support urgent action to reduce emissions if it believes that its welfare is directly dependent on quickly reducing warming, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 13, 2023
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 13, 2023
Environment Minister Stephen Guilbeault speaks to reporters in Ottawa on June 15. The electorate will only support urgent action to reduce emissions if it believes that its welfare is directly dependent on quickly reducing warming, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 16, 2023
Anyone who follows closely what has been happening in the Middle East should have recognized that a major conflict was pretty much inevitable, given the complexion and makeup of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government, writes Joseph Ingram. Photograph courtesy of Chatham House/Flickr
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 16, 2023
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 16, 2023
Anyone who follows closely what has been happening in the Middle East should have recognized that a major conflict was pretty much inevitable, given the complexion and makeup of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government, writes Joseph Ingram. Photograph courtesy of Chatham House/Flickr
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 4, 2023
In her summer meeting with Alberta Premier Danielle Smith, left, hopefully Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland communicated that the threat posed by warming is real and potentially catastrophic for Canada and for the planet as a whole, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 4, 2023
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | October 4, 2023
In her summer meeting with Alberta Premier Danielle Smith, left, hopefully Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland communicated that the threat posed by warming is real and potentially catastrophic for Canada and for the planet as a whole, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 16, 2023
Canada can play a leading role in encouraging the incoming World Bank president and its other shareholders to radically restructure the institution and, by extension, other multilateral development banks. Photograph courtesy of Deborah W. Campos/World Bank
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 16, 2023
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 16, 2023
Canada can play a leading role in encouraging the incoming World Bank president and its other shareholders to radically restructure the institution and, by extension, other multilateral development banks. Photograph courtesy of Deborah W. Campos/World Bank
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 12, 2022
Demonstrators march in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, on Nov. 11. COP27 concluded that vast increases in financial support are needed both to cover the costs of ‘loss and damage’ poorer countries have incurred as a result of warming, as well as the costs of converting their economies to clean technologies. Photograph by Oliver Kornblihtt/Mídia NINJA
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 12, 2022
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | December 12, 2022
Demonstrators march in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, on Nov. 11. COP27 concluded that vast increases in financial support are needed both to cover the costs of ‘loss and damage’ poorer countries have incurred as a result of warming, as well as the costs of converting their economies to clean technologies. Photograph by Oliver Kornblihtt/Mídia NINJA
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 9, 2022
Is Canada’s Conservative Party learning from the empirical evidence emerging from other countries, or are Pierre Poilievre’s calls for smaller government and tax cuts for the wealthy once again an example of idealized assumptions prevailing over facts on the ground, asks Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 9, 2022
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 9, 2022
Is Canada’s Conservative Party learning from the empirical evidence emerging from other countries, or are Pierre Poilievre’s calls for smaller government and tax cuts for the wealthy once again an example of idealized assumptions prevailing over facts on the ground, asks Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM, BERNARD SCHUTZ | September 28, 2022
The price of doing nothing to slow and stop global warming will be to allow our democracies to approach their social tipping points and risk political and economic collapse, write Joseph Ingram and Bernard Schutz. Pexels photograph by Markus Spiske
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM, BERNARD SCHUTZ | September 28, 2022
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM, BERNARD SCHUTZ | September 28, 2022
The price of doing nothing to slow and stop global warming will be to allow our democracies to approach their social tipping points and risk political and economic collapse, write Joseph Ingram and Bernard Schutz. Pexels photograph by Markus Spiske
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 21, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government needs to actively support the sentiments laid out by the U.S. secretary of state ‘that corruption threatens economic equity, global anti-poverty and development efforts’ if he wants its actions to be more aligned with the lofty foreign and development policy goals he often lays out, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 21, 2021
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 21, 2021
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government needs to actively support the sentiments laid out by the U.S. secretary of state ‘that corruption threatens economic equity, global anti-poverty and development efforts’ if he wants its actions to be more aligned with the lofty foreign and development policy goals he often lays out, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 29, 2021
Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with President of People’s Republic of China Xi Jinping, ahead of the November 2014 APEC summit. Political leadership within the members of the Euro-Atlantic Alliance can no longer afford to act under the delusion that both Russia and China are open to live-and-let-live policies and an uncontested coexistence, writes Joseph Ingram. Photograph courtesy of the Kremlin
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 29, 2021
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 29, 2021
Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with President of People’s Republic of China Xi Jinping, ahead of the November 2014 APEC summit. Political leadership within the members of the Euro-Atlantic Alliance can no longer afford to act under the delusion that both Russia and China are open to live-and-let-live policies and an uncontested coexistence, writes Joseph Ingram. Photograph courtesy of the Kremlin
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 5, 2021
Such are the depths of the wounds that COVID-19 has revealed that there can be no return to an economy based on business as usual, writes Joseph Ingram. Unsplash photograph by Nikita Kachanovsky
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 5, 2021
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 5, 2021
Such are the depths of the wounds that COVID-19 has revealed that there can be no return to an economy based on business as usual, writes Joseph Ingram. Unsplash photograph by Nikita Kachanovsky
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 26, 2020
In the same way that COVID-19 has revealed itself to be a threat that ultimately requires a co-ordinated global response, addressing the warming of our planet will require national policy responses based on a globally co-ordinated strategy, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 26, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | November 26, 2020
In the same way that COVID-19 has revealed itself to be a threat that ultimately requires a co-ordinated global response, addressing the warming of our planet will require national policy responses based on a globally co-ordinated strategy, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | July 15, 2020
The unwillingness of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s foreign policy to reset the short-sighted parochialism reflected in the actions of his Conservative predecessors has not only further tarnished our global standing as a middle power, but is also exposing Canadians to the inexorable threats of the 21st century, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | July 15, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | July 15, 2020
The unwillingness of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s foreign policy to reset the short-sighted parochialism reflected in the actions of his Conservative predecessors has not only further tarnished our global standing as a middle power, but is also exposing Canadians to the inexorable threats of the 21st century, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 24, 2020
Global polls today are consistent in revealing shrinking confidence in U.S. leadership, and a growing perception that the Donald Trump administration and its Republican acolytes are remoulding America’s ethos from that of a steward of democratic values, human rights, and a principled ally to other democratic states, into one of a self-centred, uncaring, and unprincipled force that can no longer be relied upon to promote the global public good, writes Joseph Ingram. Flickr photograph by Gage Skidmore
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 24, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | June 24, 2020
Global polls today are consistent in revealing shrinking confidence in U.S. leadership, and a growing perception that the Donald Trump administration and its Republican acolytes are remoulding America’s ethos from that of a steward of democratic values, human rights, and a principled ally to other democratic states, into one of a self-centred, uncaring, and unprincipled force that can no longer be relied upon to promote the global public good, writes Joseph Ingram. Flickr photograph by Gage Skidmore
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | May 6, 2020
Americans need to ask themselves why, with almost two months lead time and international examples, and with much vaunted American health care, they find themselves today with one-third of the world’s recorded cases of the coronavirus, and one-quarter of the world’s deaths from the virus and still rising. White House photograph by Andrea Hanks
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | May 6, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | May 6, 2020
Americans need to ask themselves why, with almost two months lead time and international examples, and with much vaunted American health care, they find themselves today with one-third of the world’s recorded cases of the coronavirus, and one-quarter of the world’s deaths from the virus and still rising. White House photograph by Andrea Hanks
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 1, 2020
The U.S. President Donald Trump and U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson governments’ failures to recognize the need for widespread co-operation will only exacerbate the impact this pandemic will have on both the health and the economies of their citizens, writes Joseph Ingram. White House photograph by Joyce N. Boghosian and Flickr photograph by Arno Mikkor
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 1, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | April 1, 2020
The U.S. President Donald Trump and U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson governments’ failures to recognize the need for widespread co-operation will only exacerbate the impact this pandemic will have on both the health and the economies of their citizens, writes Joseph Ingram. White House photograph by Joyce N. Boghosian and Flickr photograph by Arno Mikkor
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 11, 2020
The problem is that both Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, left, and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, right, as well as the political party they represent, are very much driven by short-term electoral considerations and the financial support of an industry that, globally, is beginning to lose its centuries-long grip on public policy, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 11, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | March 11, 2020
The problem is that both Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, left, and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, right, as well as the political party they represent, are very much driven by short-term electoral considerations and the financial support of an industry that, globally, is beginning to lose its centuries-long grip on public policy, writes Joseph Ingram. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 20, 2020
The most recent NATO-related exchanges between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump, pictured at the White House in 2017, are not just the political testosterone of two alpha males. They do in fact represent starkly contrasting views of the world based on very different histories and distinct personalities, views that are clearly apparent in how the two governments address four inexorable forces that constitute critical fault lines for all humanity; globalization, the demographic transition, automation, and climate change, writes Joe Ingram. Photograph courtesy of Twitter
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 20, 2020
Opinion | BY JOSEPH INGRAM | January 20, 2020
The most recent NATO-related exchanges between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump, pictured at the White House in 2017, are not just the political testosterone of two alpha males. They do in fact represent starkly contrasting views of the world based on very different histories and distinct personalities, views that are clearly apparent in how the two governments address four inexorable forces that constitute critical fault lines for all humanity; globalization, the demographic transition, automation, and climate change, writes Joe Ingram. Photograph courtesy of Twitter