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‘Plans themselves don’t reduce emissions,’ experts call for more action from Ottawa to tackle climate change

By Jolson Lim      

Environment Commissioner Julie Gelfand's report concluded that the government has yet to do 'much of the hard work that is required' to protect its more than $66-billion in government assets such as railways, buildings, and ports from the effects of climate change, and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The federal government has already missed two emissions reduction targets since 1992, and would likely fail to reach 2020 targets, Environment and Sustainable Development Commissioner Julie Gelfand, pictured, said in her report. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Policy experts are calling for urgent action from Ottawa to better prepare Canada to withstand the aftershocks of a warming planet, in the wake of a damning report from the country’s federal environment commissioner that found the federal government ill-prepared to mitigate the effects of serious storms, droughts, and floods, and raised doubts about existing emission reduction commitments.

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House leaders keep each other in the dark as last push on legislation begins before fall election

MPs will debate a motion to extend sitting hours until midnight for the four remaining weeks on Monday, as the government aims to pass the 20 active bills still before Parliament.

Liberal MPs want Finance Minister Morneau to revisit mortgage stress test

News|By Abbas Rana
The construction industry in the Metro Vancouver area is the equivalent of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, says Liberal MP Sukh Dhaliwal.

Make it personal: lessons in political fundraising from gurus in Washington, Ottawa

A U.S. Democrat and Canadian Conservative outline the dos and donts for a modern political fundraising campaign.

Meslin’s first-ever book a condemnation of and prescription for all that ails modern Canadian politics

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
As in a forest, old trees fall down to make way for the new—and there’s ‘a bunch of old dead trees in Ottawa’ right now, says Mr. Meslin.

Bob Joseph’s new book, Indigenous Relations, a traveller’s guide for the long road to reconciliation

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Understanding the history, context, and customs of Indigenous peoples goes a long way to improving Indigenous relations and achieving reconciliation, says author Bob Joseph.

Lobbyists seek clarity after watchdog warns political statements risk contravening code

‘This may keep individuals from participating in the political process,' says Ottawa lobbyist Scott Thurlow.

All eyes on Red Chamber, as Senators push back on key government bills

Senators have proposed dozens of changes to the Liberals' impact assessment and gun bills, have concerns about its solitary confinement legislation, and recommended its tanker-ban bill not proceed.

House may need to sit in summer to pass new NAFTA deal, says Trade Committee chair

News|By Neil Moss
‘I've never seen that before, but it's doable,’ says Liberal MP Mark Eyking. But MPs still say the Americans should make the first move toward ratification.

Senate on a spending ‘slippery slope,’ says Sen. Marshall, as Senators review office-expense rules

Senators rejected staff-suggested changes to the rules governing how they spend money from their office budgets, in favour of examining the rules and coming up with their own changes.
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