Home Page News Opinion Foreign Policy Politics Policy Legislation Lobbying Hill Life & People Hill Climbers Heard On The Hill Calendar Archives Classifieds
Hill Times Events Inside Ottawa Directory Hill Times Store Hill Times Careers The Wire Report The Lobby Monitor Parliament Now
Subscribe Free Trial Reuse & Permissions Advertising FAQ
Log In
Opinion

Canadian copyright reform requires a fix to the fair dealing gap

By Michael Geist      

If Canada is to re-examine the decision to ratify treaties on the basis that it was all just a wrong guess, the starting point would be to fix the imbalance on fair dealing in the analog and digital worlds that has undermined Canadian innovation and the commitment to balance found in copyright law.

Music Canada President Graham Henderson told the Economic Club of Canada last month about 'the gross mismatch between the volume of music being enjoyed by consumers and the revenues being returned to the music community.' The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Share a story
The story link will be added automatically.

In the decade of lobbying leading up to the reform of Canadian copyright law in 2012, copyright lobby groups had one core message: Canada needed to implement and ratify the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Internet treaties. While many education, consumer, and business groups expressed concern that the digital lock rules in the treaties would harm innovation, the industry was insistent that the treaties represented an essential component of digital copyright reform.

The lobbying campaign was successful as Canada proceeded to implement and ratify the treaties. The legislation is still relatively new, but in a stunning reversal, one of the leading lobby groups now says that the drafters of the WIPO Internet Treaties were just guessing and suggests that they guessed wrong.

The intensity of the lobbying for the WIPO Internet treaties is difficult to overstate. For years, the industry emphasized the importance of the treaties as the baseline starting point for reform. But in a speech to the Economic Club of Canada last month, Music Canada President Graham Henderson acknowledged that “the people setting the rules for our world were well-intentioned and clever; but the reality is that they were guessing.”

Henderson proceeded to make the case that the drafters guessed wrong, arguing that “everything would come down to the question of balance” and that “very quickly, fissures began to appear” with benefits to intermediaries and losses to creators. This led Henderson to claim that there is a “value gap”, which he defines as “the gross mismatch between the volume of music being enjoyed by consumers and the revenues being returned to the music community.”

The criticism of the WIPO Internet treaties raises several issues.

It is striking to see Henderson now talk about the need for balance in the treaties since that is exactly what educators, librarians, consumer groups, and many innovative businesses argued in 2010 when the reform bill was introduced. Simply put, there was no balance in the bill’s digital lock provisions, which remain among the most restrictive in the world and badly undermine the traditional copyright balance in the digital world.

While Canadians can freely exercise their fair dealing rights in the analog world, the 2012 reforms went far beyond the WIPO treaty requirements by creating unnecessary restrictions on fair dealing in the digital environment. This creates a “fair dealing gap”, where there is a massive disparity between user rights in the analog world and the digital world. The fair dealing gap should be addressed in 2017 by establishing a long overdue fair dealing exception for the digital lock rules.

Second, claims that the treaties led to an unfair balance favouring technology companies simply does not apply in Canada, if anywhere. Canada did not implement the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act notice-and-takedown system, nor grant safe harbours from liability in 1998. The 2012 Canadian reforms include some safe harbours, but not before the industry received the right to forward an unlimited number of notices to internet users at no cost through the notice-and-notice rules, a new enabler provision to make it easier to target piracy websites, and the restrictive digital lock rules.

Further, the government also gave the music industry a copyright term extension for sound recordings in 2015 with little public debate or consultation. In other words, claims that “policy-making regarding copyright law continues to be driven by the popular mythology that digital technologies and platforms produce lucrative new opportunities for the creative economy”, as stated by Henderson, is not reflective of the Canadian experience.

Third, unlike the fair dealing gap which is the result of legislative reform, the so-called “value gap” has nothing to do with legislative change. Industry frustration with payments for streaming services are not a function of the law, but rather based on revenue sharing from advertising.

Some may wish to paint the Canadian and U.S. digital copyright experiences as the same, but the reality is that they are very different. Canada did not enact the U.S. rules in 1998. Rather, it ultimately gave the industry what it asked for, implementing and ratifying the WIPO Internet treaties in an overly restrictive manner that created a fair dealing gap that persists to this day.

If Canada is to re-examine the decision to ratify those treaties on the basis that it was all just a wrong guess, the starting point would be to fix the imbalance on fair dealing in the analog and digital worlds that has undermined Canadian innovation and the commitment to balance found in copyright law.

Sponsored Content

Supporting a Digital Public Sector

By Schneider Electric’s Secure Power Division - Canada

Politics This Morning

Get the latest news from The Hill Times

Politics This Morning


Your email has been added. An email has been sent to your address, please click the link inside of it to confirm your subscription.

Feds to miss 2021 target to lift remaining boil-water advisories, pledge to redouble commitment

News|By Beatrice Paez
The $1.5-billion funding boost is being framed as an assurance the government is committed, over the long term, to lifting those remaining advisories and preventing new ones from coming into effect. 

Centre Block renovation budget tops $655-million as post-holiday stonework nears

News
PSPC has settled on leaving intact the bullet holes left behind after a fatal shootout involving RCMP officers, security, and Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, who claimed allegiance to the so-called Islamic State.

NDP, Bloc push for Boeing 737 Max crash inquiry as Liberals, Conservatives block effort

‘In order to have closure, you need to have truth come out,’ says Chris Moore, who believes an inquiry is the best way to get answers about his daughter’s ‘needless’ death in the 2019 crash.

BOIE approves nearly $12-million in new annual House spending

Plus, the House administration recently published its first-ever disclosure reports, detailing a combined total of more than $9.6-million in expenses.

‘Very important’ embassy inauguration bash, which attracts influential Washington power brokers, up in the air

News|By Neil Moss
A PMO spokesperson wouldn't say if any cabinet members will be headed to Washington next January for Joe Biden's inauguration.

Vague on details, feds’ fiscal update dangles possibility of spring election, say experts

News|By Beatrice Paez
The withholding of specifics in the economic statement is part of a longer-term fiscal and electoral strategy to assure different groups the government has their back, says McGill University professor Daniel Béland.

Race to replace MP Kent as Thornhill’s Conservative on the ballot a chance to ‘bring Conservatives back into the fold,’ sign of ‘generational shift,’ say early candidates

News|By Mike Lapointe
Two names have emerged stating their intentions of running for the party’s nomination in the riding so far, including long-time Conservative staffer Melissa Lantsman as well as Progressive Conservative MPP Gila Martow.

Feds propose pumping $100-billion into economy to stimulate recovery, as deficit on track to soar to $381-billion

News|By Beatrice Paez
In the absence of a fiscal anchor, Ottawa said it intends to use 'several indicators' related to the labour market such as the employment rate, hours worked, and level of unemployment.

‘That’s a tough one’: potential prolonged delay in COVID-19 vaccines for Canadians would be politically ‘explosive’ for Trudeau Liberals, say politicos

News|By Abbas Rana
If Canadians are behind other countries in getting inoculated against COVID-19, the Liberals would not want a spring election, as speculated, since it would mean losing the government, say politicos.
Your group subscription includes premium access to Politics This Morning briefing.