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Monday, January 30, 2023
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Monday, January 30, 2023 | Latest Paper

Sibongiseni Dlamini-Mntambo

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, in support of the TRIPS waiver for COVID-19 vaccines and more, said ‘flexibilities in trade regulations exist for emergencies.’ Photograph courtesy of UN Geneva/Flickr
Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, in support of the TRIPS waiver for COVID-19 vaccines and more, said ‘flexibilities in trade regulations exist for emergencies.’ Photograph courtesy of UN Geneva/Flickr
Nelson and Winnie Mandela are pictured with Mila and Brian Mulroney on Parliament Hill on June 18, 1990. It was Mr. Mandela's first visit to Canada, four months after being released from 27 years in jail. On the eve of what would have been Nelson Mandela’s birthday, South Africa remembers Canada’s unwavering support for the anti-apartheid movement, writes High Commissioner Sibongiseni Dlamini-Mntambo. The hill Times photograph by Jim Creskey
Nelson and Winnie Mandela are pictured with Mila and Brian Mulroney on Parliament Hill on June 18, 1990. It was Mr. Mandela's first visit to Canada, four months after being released from 27 years in jail. On the eve of what would have been Nelson Mandela’s birthday, South Africa remembers Canada’s unwavering support for the anti-apartheid movement, writes High Commissioner Sibongiseni Dlamini-Mntambo. The hill Times photograph by Jim Creskey
Children are pictured in a a ‘resettlement’ village in the former province of Natal, South Africa in January 1982. Millions of Black South Africans were forcibly resettled in such villages called Black ‘homelands’ as of 1948. The Bantu education system presented Blacks as 'sub-human beings incapable of assimilating civilization,' thereby excluding them from mainstream political, economic, and social life and advancement. Photograph courtesy of the United Nations
Children are pictured in a a ‘resettlement’ village in the former province of Natal, South Africa in January 1982. Millions of Black South Africans were forcibly resettled in such villages called Black ‘homelands’ as of 1948. The Bantu education system presented Blacks as 'sub-human beings incapable of assimilating civilization,' thereby excluding them from mainstream political, economic, and social life and advancement. Photograph courtesy of the United Nations