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Murray Fallis

Murray Fallis is an articling fellow with the John Howard Society of Canada.

Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | February 25, 2021
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured Oct. 19, 2020. Tabled by Conservative MP Richard Bragdon, the bill requires the minister of public safety to establish a 'framework to reduce recidivism.' Among other requirements, the framework would lean on international best practices while also mandating the investigation of community support programs designed to rehabilitate parolees, writes Murray Fallis. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | February 25, 2021
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | February 25, 2021
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, pictured Oct. 19, 2020. Tabled by Conservative MP Richard Bragdon, the bill requires the minister of public safety to establish a 'framework to reduce recidivism.' Among other requirements, the framework would lean on international best practices while also mandating the investigation of community support programs designed to rehabilitate parolees, writes Murray Fallis. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 30, 2020
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette, pictured on Feb. 1, 2020, at the winter celebration at the Governor General's residence at Rideau Hall. The Letters Patent grant the Governor General unique powers, including the authority to grant a respite from serving a criminal sentence. Under Articles II and XII, upon the advice of a single privy councillor, the Governor General has the discretion to release medically vulnerable, low-risk prisoners. This would allow them to serve their sentences, with conditions, in the community. This past spring, two privy councillors, Serge Joyal and Frances Lankin, sent exactly such advice to Gov. Gen. Payette, writes Murray Fallis. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 30, 2020
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 30, 2020
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette, pictured on Feb. 1, 2020, at the winter celebration at the Governor General's residence at Rideau Hall. The Letters Patent grant the Governor General unique powers, including the authority to grant a respite from serving a criminal sentence. Under Articles II and XII, upon the advice of a single privy councillor, the Governor General has the discretion to release medically vulnerable, low-risk prisoners. This would allow them to serve their sentences, with conditions, in the community. This past spring, two privy councillors, Serge Joyal and Frances Lankin, sent exactly such advice to Gov. Gen. Payette, writes Murray Fallis. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 16, 2020
Furthermore, via sections 81-84 of the CCRA, Article 34 should prompt greater engagement between the Correctional Service, the Parole Board of Canada, and local Indigenous communities. These under-used sections of the CCRA can be increasingly used to re-integrate low-risk offenders safely, writes Murray Fallis. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 16, 2020
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 16, 2020
Furthermore, via sections 81-84 of the CCRA, Article 34 should prompt greater engagement between the Correctional Service, the Parole Board of Canada, and local Indigenous communities. These under-used sections of the CCRA can be increasingly used to re-integrate low-risk offenders safely, writes Murray Fallis. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 2, 2020
Canada’s human rights record is far from squeaky clean. Residential schools, the Kamagata Maru, Japanese internment, a Chinese head tax. Yet, in moments of our history a positive record on human rights has shone through. If we want to be proud of the Canadian history that we are presently writing, we need accede to the UNOPCAT. If not, how can we ever demand the same of others? Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 2, 2020
Opinion | BY MURRAY FALLIS | December 2, 2020
Canada’s human rights record is far from squeaky clean. Residential schools, the Kamagata Maru, Japanese internment, a Chinese head tax. Yet, in moments of our history a positive record on human rights has shone through. If we want to be proud of the Canadian history that we are presently writing, we need accede to the UNOPCAT. If not, how can we ever demand the same of others? Photograph courtesy of Pixabay