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Michael Hatfield

Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | December 12, 2022
Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Nov. 24, 2022, in Ottawa. The federal fiscal response to the unprecedented changes in the economy brought on by the COVID pandemic seems to have been—if not exactly error-free—nimble and, on balance, appropriate, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | December 12, 2022
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | December 12, 2022
Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, pictured Nov. 24, 2022, in Ottawa. The federal fiscal response to the unprecedented changes in the economy brought on by the COVID pandemic seems to have been—if not exactly error-free—nimble and, on balance, appropriate, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 10, 2022
Former British prime minister Liz Truss, left, resigned last month after only 44 days in office after her failed attempt to reorient the government's economic agenda, and current British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, right. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikimedia and Flickr
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 10, 2022
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 10, 2022
Former British prime minister Liz Truss, left, resigned last month after only 44 days in office after her failed attempt to reorient the government's economic agenda, and current British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, right. Photographs courtesy of Commons Wikimedia and Flickr
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 4, 2022
Networking at the Calgary Stampede: Jean Charest, left, greeting a woman, and Pierre Poilievre with a supporter, both pictured at the Calgary Stampede last month. A closer analysis of a recent Angus Reid poll reveals that Charest has the support needed to return the Conservatives to power, while Poilievre would continue the legacy of defeat started by Harper in 2015 and continued under the leadership of Andrew Scheer and Erin O’Toole, writes Michael Hatfield. Photographs courtesy of Twitter
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 4, 2022
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 4, 2022
Networking at the Calgary Stampede: Jean Charest, left, greeting a woman, and Pierre Poilievre with a supporter, both pictured at the Calgary Stampede last month. A closer analysis of a recent Angus Reid poll reveals that Charest has the support needed to return the Conservatives to power, while Poilievre would continue the legacy of defeat started by Harper in 2015 and continued under the leadership of Andrew Scheer and Erin O’Toole, writes Michael Hatfield. Photographs courtesy of Twitter
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 12, 2022
NDP MP Leah Gazan and Independent Senator Kim Pate both have private member's bills proposing a Guaranteed Basic Income in the House and in the Senate, respectively. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 12, 2022
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 12, 2022
NDP MP Leah Gazan and Independent Senator Kim Pate both have private member's bills proposing a Guaranteed Basic Income in the House and in the Senate, respectively. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 31, 2022
The other mystery to be solved is why this historic success in combating poverty and disposable income inequality received so little attention. It’s not as if Stats Can didn’t draw attention to the progress being made. An article accompanying the 2020 Canadian Income Survey release and a statement drawn from that article by the Department of Employment and Social Development both drew attention to significant achievements, writes Michael Hatfield. Image courtesy of Mike Chai/Pexels
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 31, 2022
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 31, 2022
The other mystery to be solved is why this historic success in combating poverty and disposable income inequality received so little attention. It’s not as if Stats Can didn’t draw attention to the progress being made. An article accompanying the 2020 Canadian Income Survey release and a statement drawn from that article by the Department of Employment and Social Development both drew attention to significant achievements, writes Michael Hatfield. Image courtesy of Mike Chai/Pexels
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 11, 2021
Recently, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned that if the measures in U.S. President Joe Biden’s massive relief and recovery package were not passed, a return to full employment would not occur until 2025. But if his package passed, she claimed full employment could be achieved in 2022. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 11, 2021
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | March 11, 2021
Recently, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned that if the measures in U.S. President Joe Biden’s massive relief and recovery package were not passed, a return to full employment would not occur until 2025. But if his package passed, she claimed full employment could be achieved in 2022. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | September 16, 2020
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs secured a majority on Sept. 14, in what was the country's first election since the COVID-19 pandemic. Photograph courtesy of Blaine Higgs' Twitter profile
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | September 16, 2020
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | September 16, 2020
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs secured a majority on Sept. 14, in what was the country's first election since the COVID-19 pandemic. Photograph courtesy of Blaine Higgs' Twitter profile
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 4, 2019
Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer, pictured on Oct. 7, 2019, arriving at the televised leadership debate in Gatineau, Que. The current rumblings about dumping Andrew Scheer as leader mask a deeper and more painful choice for the Conservative Party, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 4, 2019
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 4, 2019
Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer, pictured on Oct. 7, 2019, arriving at the televised leadership debate in Gatineau, Que. The current rumblings about dumping Andrew Scheer as leader mask a deeper and more painful choice for the Conservative Party, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 16, 2019
Pointing to Public Accounts data, the Conservative Party and business journalists agree that the Liberals broke their promise to run deficits of no more than $10-billion and to return quickly to a surplus. But Statistics Canada’s National Accounts data leads to a very different conclusion. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 16, 2019
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 16, 2019
Pointing to Public Accounts data, the Conservative Party and business journalists agree that the Liberals broke their promise to run deficits of no more than $10-billion and to return quickly to a surplus. But Statistics Canada’s National Accounts data leads to a very different conclusion. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 1, 2019
Prime minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 17, 2019, in Ottawa with his chief of staff, Katie Telford, centre, and his director of communications, Kate Purchase, left. They also delivered on the promise that the increase in the net debt to GDP ratio would be reversed after the 2016-17 fiscal year, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 1, 2019
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 1, 2019
Prime minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on June 17, 2019, in Ottawa with his chief of staff, Katie Telford, centre, and his director of communications, Kate Purchase, left. They also delivered on the promise that the increase in the net debt to GDP ratio would be reversed after the 2016-17 fiscal year, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 13, 2018
Families, Children and Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos, pictured. Why hasn’t every government in the world adopted a universal basic income, asks Michael Hatfield. The Ontario government is currently testing a form of UBI at five sites throughout Ontario and its advocates claim it would end poverty. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 13, 2018
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | August 13, 2018
Families, Children and Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos, pictured. Why hasn’t every government in the world adopted a universal basic income, asks Michael Hatfield. The Ontario government is currently testing a form of UBI at five sites throughout Ontario and its advocates claim it would end poverty. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 11, 2018
No other Father of Confederation fits the model of tragic hero so well as Louis Riel, pictured centre, writes Michael Hatfield. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 11, 2018
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 11, 2018
No other Father of Confederation fits the model of tragic hero so well as Louis Riel, pictured centre, writes Michael Hatfield. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 2, 2018
Sir Charles Tupper, a Canadian father of Confederation as premier of Nova Scotia from 1864 to 1867, he led Nova Scotia into Confederation and later served as the sixth prime minister of Canada from May 1, 1896 until July 8, 1896. Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 2, 2018
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 2, 2018
Sir Charles Tupper, a Canadian father of Confederation as premier of Nova Scotia from 1864 to 1867, he led Nova Scotia into Confederation and later served as the sixth prime minister of Canada from May 1, 1896 until July 8, 1896. Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 30, 2017
Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley was one of the Fathers of Confederation and the lieutenant governor of New Brunswick. Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 30, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | October 30, 2017
Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley was one of the Fathers of Confederation and the lieutenant governor of New Brunswick. Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 24, 2017
CPR railroad financier Donald Smith, pictured at Craigellachie, B.C. at 9:22 a.m. on Nov. 7, 1885, driving the ceremonial final spike driven into the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), marking the end of a saga of natural disasters, financial crises, and even rebellion that plagued Canada's first transcontinental railroad from its beginning. Photograph courtesy of Canadian Encyclopedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 24, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 24, 2017
CPR railroad financier Donald Smith, pictured at Craigellachie, B.C. at 9:22 a.m. on Nov. 7, 1885, driving the ceremonial final spike driven into the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), marking the end of a saga of natural disasters, financial crises, and even rebellion that plagued Canada's first transcontinental railroad from its beginning. Photograph courtesy of Canadian Encyclopedia
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 29, 2017
John A. Macdonald, George-Étienne Cartier, and John G. Irvine, pictured in 1860. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 29, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | May 29, 2017
John A. Macdonald, George-Étienne Cartier, and John G. Irvine, pictured in 1860. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 17, 2017
In February 1865, during the debate on Confederation in the legislature of the Province of Canada, George-Étienne Cartier, pictured, also wrestled with the issue of diversity and Canadian nationality. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 17, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | April 17, 2017
In February 1865, during the debate on Confederation in the legislature of the Province of Canada, George-Étienne Cartier, pictured, also wrestled with the issue of diversity and Canadian nationality. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Women pictured in Ottawa on Jan. 21, 2017, taking part in the Women's March in protest to Donald Trump's presidency. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | January 30, 2017
Women pictured in Ottawa on Jan. 21, 2017, taking part in the Women's March in protest to Donald Trump's presidency. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 28, 2016
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Canada Child Benefit is much more generous than its predecessor, the National Child Benefit, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 28, 2016
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 28, 2016
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Canada Child Benefit is much more generous than its predecessor, the National Child Benefit, writes Michael Hatfield. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 21, 2016
Unlike increased welfare payments, these present no disincentive to earn and, in the case of the WITB, actually provide an incentive to take low-paying jobs. The incentive to take entry-level jobs was further buttressed by substantial real increases in minimum wages in almost every province. The result was lower income inequality, lower poverty rates, particularly for children and substantial real increases in disposable incomes in the bottom half of the income distribution. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 21, 2016
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 21, 2016
Unlike increased welfare payments, these present no disincentive to earn and, in the case of the WITB, actually provide an incentive to take low-paying jobs. The incentive to take entry-level jobs was further buttressed by substantial real increases in minimum wages in almost every province. The result was lower income inequality, lower poverty rates, particularly for children and substantial real increases in disposable incomes in the bottom half of the income distribution. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 14, 2016
There is no official measure of poverty for Canada, as a whole. The measure of low income with the longest history of data collection is the 1992 base post-income tax low income cut-offs. Using this measure, the low income rate for children under age 18 living changed little between 1990 and 2000, dipping from 14.0 per cent to 13.9 per cent. The rate for all persons 18-64 rose from 11.2 per cent to 12.9 per cent. Between 2000 and 2014, the rate for children fell sharply from 13.9 per cent to an all-time low of 8.5 per cent. The rate for persons aged 18-64 fell from 12.9 per cent to 10.0 per cent. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 14, 2016
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | November 14, 2016
There is no official measure of poverty for Canada, as a whole. The measure of low income with the longest history of data collection is the 1992 base post-income tax low income cut-offs. Using this measure, the low income rate for children under age 18 living changed little between 1990 and 2000, dipping from 14.0 per cent to 13.9 per cent. The rate for all persons 18-64 rose from 11.2 per cent to 12.9 per cent. Between 2000 and 2014, the rate for children fell sharply from 13.9 per cent to an all-time low of 8.5 per cent. The rate for persons aged 18-64 fell from 12.9 per cent to 10.0 per cent. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 4, 2016
One of the main Leave supporters, United Kingdom Independence Party Leader Nigel Farage, has already admitted that their popular promise to voters during the campaign that all the money currently paid to the EU by the U.K. would be redirected into increased funding for the National Health Service was 'a mistake.' Photograph courtesy of YouTube
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 4, 2016
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | July 4, 2016
One of the main Leave supporters, United Kingdom Independence Party Leader Nigel Farage, has already admitted that their popular promise to voters during the campaign that all the money currently paid to the EU by the U.K. would be redirected into increased funding for the National Health Service was 'a mistake.' Photograph courtesy of YouTube
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 6, 2016
The endorsement of Donald Trump is a sad commentary on how much the Republican Party's hatred and fear of Hillary Clinton and the Democrats has unhinged their ability to see where the true danger to the Republic lies in the coming election. Photograph courtesy of YouTube
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 6, 2016
Opinion | BY MICHAEL HATFIELD | June 6, 2016
The endorsement of Donald Trump is a sad commentary on how much the Republican Party's hatred and fear of Hillary Clinton and the Democrats has unhinged their ability to see where the true danger to the Republic lies in the coming election. Photograph courtesy of YouTube