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John P. Smol

Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 20, 2016
Decades of research show that fish depend upon vibrant rivers, lakes and ocean waters to thrive. Yet, in 2012, the Harper government removed habitat protection from the Fisheries Act. The revision shrank the scope of the law, covering only fish that were part of 'a commercial, recreational or aboriginal fishery.' Countless other species—and the habitat that support them—were left vulnerable to pollution and degradation. By restoring the Fisheries Act to its full strength, the government can meet its own standard for scientific integrity, write David Schindler and John Smol. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 20, 2016
Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 20, 2016
Decades of research show that fish depend upon vibrant rivers, lakes and ocean waters to thrive. Yet, in 2012, the Harper government removed habitat protection from the Fisheries Act. The revision shrank the scope of the law, covering only fish that were part of 'a commercial, recreational or aboriginal fishery.' Countless other species—and the habitat that support them—were left vulnerable to pollution and degradation. By restoring the Fisheries Act to its full strength, the government can meet its own standard for scientific integrity, write David Schindler and John Smol. The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 15, 2016
The Harper government removed habitat protection from the Fisheries Act. The revision shrank the scope of the law, covering only fish that were part of 'a commercial, recreational, or aboriginal' fishery. Flickr photo by David Keep
Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 15, 2016
Opinion | BY DAVID SCHINDLER, JOHN P. SMOL | June 15, 2016
The Harper government removed habitat protection from the Fisheries Act. The revision shrank the scope of the law, covering only fish that were part of 'a commercial, recreational, or aboriginal' fishery. Flickr photo by David Keep