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Saturday, January 28, 2023
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Ethel Blondin-Andrew

Opinion | BY ETHEL BLONDIN-ANDREW | February 3, 2020
Last August, the Lutsël K’e Dene First Nation signed an agreement with the Government of Canada and the Government of the Northwest Territories to permanently protect 26,376 square kilometres of vibrant lands. Called Thaidene Nëné, it is an Indigenous protected area and parts are also a national park, territorial park, and wildlife conservation area. Across the country, Indigenous nations are advancing some of the biggest, most ambitious conservation initiatives, in places we have called home since long before Canada existed. Indigenous leaders are approaching conservation at the grand scale required to turn things around, writes Ethel Blondie-Andrew. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY ETHEL BLONDIN-ANDREW | February 3, 2020
Opinion | BY ETHEL BLONDIN-ANDREW | February 3, 2020
Last August, the Lutsël K’e Dene First Nation signed an agreement with the Government of Canada and the Government of the Northwest Territories to permanently protect 26,376 square kilometres of vibrant lands. Called Thaidene Nëné, it is an Indigenous protected area and parts are also a national park, territorial park, and wildlife conservation area. Across the country, Indigenous nations are advancing some of the biggest, most ambitious conservation initiatives, in places we have called home since long before Canada existed. Indigenous leaders are approaching conservation at the grand scale required to turn things around, writes Ethel Blondie-Andrew. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay