Friday, June 21, 2024
Canada’s Politics and Government News Source Since 1989
Friday, June 21, 2024 | Latest Paper

Earl Turcotte

Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 14, 2023
Then-secretary-general Boutros Boutros-Ghali, right, with Kofi Annan, UN secretary-general designate. In 1992, Boutros-Ghali proposed that the UN Security Council be provided forces and resources to enable it to intervene in an imminent or ongoing conflict when all efforts at mediation have been exhausted. UN photograph/Flickr
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 14, 2023
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 14, 2023
Then-secretary-general Boutros Boutros-Ghali, right, with Kofi Annan, UN secretary-general designate. In 1992, Boutros-Ghali proposed that the UN Security Council be provided forces and resources to enable it to intervene in an imminent or ongoing conflict when all efforts at mediation have been exhausted. UN photograph/Flickr
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 12, 2023
Foreign Minister Mélanie Joly should fix the exception in the law that allows a Canadian commander of a multinational force to direct the use of cluster munitions by non-party state armed forces, writes Earl Turcotte. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 12, 2023
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 12, 2023
Foreign Minister Mélanie Joly should fix the exception in the law that allows a Canadian commander of a multinational force to direct the use of cluster munitions by non-party state armed forces, writes Earl Turcotte. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 26, 2022
U.S. President Joe Biden, left, is reportedly dealing with a request from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s government to provide it with cluster munitions in its fight against Russia. Photographs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Flickr/President of Ukraine
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 26, 2022
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | December 26, 2022
U.S. President Joe Biden, left, is reportedly dealing with a request from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s government to provide it with cluster munitions in its fight against Russia. Photographs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Flickr/President of Ukraine
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | March 10, 2022
No matter how determined Russian President Vladimir Putin is, if faced with the combined military strength of 100 or more nations, or even NATO states alone, he would pull back, writes Earl Turcotte. UN photograph by Mark Garten
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | March 10, 2022
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | March 10, 2022
No matter how determined Russian President Vladimir Putin is, if faced with the combined military strength of 100 or more nations, or even NATO states alone, he would pull back, writes Earl Turcotte. UN photograph by Mark Garten
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | May 17, 2021
Now Foreign Minister Marc Garneau was a vocal opposition spokesperson to the Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act before it was passed as a law in 2014. Perhaps he, a man of integrity who championed amending the legislation while in opposition, will finally make this right, writes Earl Turcotte. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | May 17, 2021
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | May 17, 2021
Now Foreign Minister Marc Garneau was a vocal opposition spokesperson to the Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act before it was passed as a law in 2014. Perhaps he, a man of integrity who championed amending the legislation while in opposition, will finally make this right, writes Earl Turcotte. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | January 18, 2021
In the dying days of his presidency, senior U.S. politicians, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi expressed concern about Donald Trump having access to the country’s nuclear codes. Flickr photograph by Gage Skidmore
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | January 18, 2021
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | January 18, 2021
In the dying days of his presidency, senior U.S. politicians, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi expressed concern about Donald Trump having access to the country’s nuclear codes. Flickr photograph by Gage Skidmore
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | June 8, 2020
Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured on Feb. 5, 2020, on the Hill, recently said, 'The UN Security Council is the big table. This is where the most consequential decisions are taken with respect to peace and security around the world.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | June 8, 2020
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | June 8, 2020
Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured on Feb. 5, 2020, on the Hill, recently said, 'The UN Security Council is the big table. This is where the most consequential decisions are taken with respect to peace and security around the world.' The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | April 15, 2020
Russia and the U.S., led by presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump, respectively, have produced missiles that can travel up to 27 times the speed of sound and are considered to be unstoppable. White House photograph by Shealah Craighead
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | April 15, 2020
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | April 15, 2020
Russia and the U.S., led by presidents Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump, respectively, have produced missiles that can travel up to 27 times the speed of sound and are considered to be unstoppable. White House photograph by Shealah Craighead
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 1, 2019
When the top military commanders of the, militarily, most powerful country on Earth suggest that 'nuclear weapons could create the conditions for decisive results and the restoration of strategic stability,' we should all be worried sick and ask ourselves, what can we do—individually and collectively—to prevent this insanity from continuing, writes Earl Turcotte. Screen capture image of Global Research Centre for Research on Globalization
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 1, 2019
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | July 1, 2019
When the top military commanders of the, militarily, most powerful country on Earth suggest that 'nuclear weapons could create the conditions for decisive results and the restoration of strategic stability,' we should all be worried sick and ask ourselves, what can we do—individually and collectively—to prevent this insanity from continuing, writes Earl Turcotte. Screen capture image of Global Research Centre for Research on Globalization
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | October 25, 2017
The remains of the Prefectural Industry Promotion Building in Hiroshima, Japan, on Sept. 1, 1945, after it was hit by an atomic bomb on Aug. 6 of that year. Earl Turcotte says all the signs are there that another catastrophe could come. UN photograph by DB
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | October 25, 2017
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | October 25, 2017
The remains of the Prefectural Industry Promotion Building in Hiroshima, Japan, on Sept. 1, 1945, after it was hit by an atomic bomb on Aug. 6 of that year. Earl Turcotte says all the signs are there that another catastrophe could come. UN photograph by DB
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | November 9, 2016
Foreign Minister Stéphane Dion speaks at the UN Conference on Disarmament in Geneva on March 2. UN photograph by Elma Okic
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | November 9, 2016
Opinion | BY EARL TURCOTTE | November 9, 2016
Foreign Minister Stéphane Dion speaks at the UN Conference on Disarmament in Geneva on March 2. UN photograph by Elma Okic