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David Carment and Richard Nimijean

David Carment is editor of the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal and a fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. Richard Nimijean is a member of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. 

U.S. President Donald Trump and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured in this file photograph. Politically, if we plank the curve, Mr. Trudeau will weather the minority Parliament and gain a majority in a few years, citing the need for strong leadership in the face of rebuilding the economy. If he falters, the hard-liners’ agenda will prove to be the wedge that keeps Canada a divided nation, write David Carment and Richard Nimijean. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
U.S. President Donald Trump and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured in this file photograph. Politically, if we plank the curve, Mr. Trudeau will weather the minority Parliament and gain a majority in a few years, citing the need for strong leadership in the face of rebuilding the economy. If he falters, the hard-liners’ agenda will prove to be the wedge that keeps Canada a divided nation, write David Carment and Richard Nimijean. Photograph courtesy of Global Affairs Canada
In a multi-polar world, smaller, less powerful countries like Canada can gain leverage by playing off one power against another rather than being at the mercy of their whims. In this case, Canada could use the prospect of extraditing Meng Wanzhou, and banning Huawei to see if China offers better terms than existing agreements with the U.S., write David Carment and Richard Nimijean. Ms. Meng is pictured right, on Oct. 2, 2014, with Andrey Kostin, left, and Vladimir Putin, at the Russia Calling Investment Forum in Moscow, Russia. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia
In a multi-polar world, smaller, less powerful countries like Canada can gain leverage by playing off one power against another rather than being at the mercy of their whims. In this case, Canada could use the prospect of extraditing Meng Wanzhou, and banning Huawei to see if China offers better terms than existing agreements with the U.S., write David Carment and Richard Nimijean. Ms. Meng is pictured right, on Oct. 2, 2014, with Andrey Kostin, left, and Vladimir Putin, at the Russia Calling Investment Forum in Moscow, Russia. Photograph courtesy of Commons Wikimedia