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Dan Kraus

Dan Kraus is a conservation scientist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS, JUSTINA RAY | March 2, 2023
Some of Canada's caribou populations are considered to be threatened under the Species at Risk Act. While Canada has plenty of laws, policies, and plans intended to protect nature, the continued decline of wildlife makes clear the shortcomings of current approaches, write Dan Kraus and Justina Ray. Photograph by Peupleloup, courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS, JUSTINA RAY | March 2, 2023
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS, JUSTINA RAY | March 2, 2023
Some of Canada's caribou populations are considered to be threatened under the Species at Risk Act. While Canada has plenty of laws, policies, and plans intended to protect nature, the continued decline of wildlife makes clear the shortcomings of current approaches, write Dan Kraus and Justina Ray. Photograph by Peupleloup, courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 3, 2021
A swift fox, pictured in Saskatchewan. Wildlife recovery is powerful evidence of hope. It should inspire us. But we need more of these stories, and we need to build on their success. Wildlife recovery represents the best in people. It counters the notion that we are destroyers of nature and shows we can be stewards who make the natural world richer for ourselves and those who will follow, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 3, 2021
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 3, 2021
A swift fox, pictured in Saskatchewan. Wildlife recovery is powerful evidence of hope. It should inspire us. But we need more of these stories, and we need to build on their success. Wildlife recovery represents the best in people. It counters the notion that we are destroyers of nature and shows we can be stewards who make the natural world richer for ourselves and those who will follow, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Flickr
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | December 28, 2020
Despite one of the most monumental crises of our generation, nature conservation has continued, and moved us closer to a more sustainable world for people and for nature, writes Dan Kraus. Unsplash photograph by Kalen Emsley
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | December 28, 2020
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | December 28, 2020
Despite one of the most monumental crises of our generation, nature conservation has continued, and moved us closer to a more sustainable world for people and for nature, writes Dan Kraus. Unsplash photograph by Kalen Emsley
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 16, 2020
Threats to the evening grosbeak, pictured, include loss of mature and old-growth forests. It was designated of special concern by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 16, 2020
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 16, 2020
Threats to the evening grosbeak, pictured, include loss of mature and old-growth forests. It was designated of special concern by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 29, 2020
Though there has been tremendous progress in protecting nature since 1962 and some wildlife, including peregrine falcons, are doing better, more work needs to be done, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 29, 2020
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 29, 2020
Though there has been tremendous progress in protecting nature since 1962 and some wildlife, including peregrine falcons, are doing better, more work needs to be done, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Pixabay
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 11, 2019
In 1893, Algonquin Provincial Park was set up to protect forested headwaters from settlement and land clearing. Carbon parks would protect some of the world’s last areas of true forest wilderness and important wildlife habitats, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 11, 2019
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | November 11, 2019
In 1893, Algonquin Provincial Park was set up to protect forested headwaters from settlement and land clearing. Carbon parks would protect some of the world’s last areas of true forest wilderness and important wildlife habitats, writes Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | May 13, 2019
By accelerating habitat conservation in every province and territory in Canada, we can address both the biodiversity and climate crises. Perhaps most importantly, we can change our relationship with nature, writes Dan Krauss. Photograph courtesy Wikipedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | May 13, 2019
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | May 13, 2019
By accelerating habitat conservation in every province and territory in Canada, we can address both the biodiversity and climate crises. Perhaps most importantly, we can change our relationship with nature, writes Dan Krauss. Photograph courtesy Wikipedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 8, 2018
The biggest challenge to our generation is stopping habitat loss, says conservation biologist Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Pxhere
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 8, 2018
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | June 8, 2018
The biggest challenge to our generation is stopping habitat loss, says conservation biologist Dan Kraus. Photograph courtesy of Pxhere
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | February 5, 2018
Many wildlife species rely on wetlands. They provide vital nesting and feeding grounds for waterfowl and many other animals. When wetlands disappear, species that depend on these habitats have nowhere else to live. Some species become endangered, or no longer occur in Canada. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | February 5, 2018
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | February 5, 2018
Many wildlife species rely on wetlands. They provide vital nesting and feeding grounds for waterfowl and many other animals. When wetlands disappear, species that depend on these habitats have nowhere else to live. Some species become endangered, or no longer occur in Canada. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | September 18, 2017
Canada's federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, pictured Aug. 21, 2017, on National Aboriginal Day in Ottawa. The Hill Times file photograph
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | September 18, 2017
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | September 18, 2017
Canada's federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, pictured Aug. 21, 2017, on National Aboriginal Day in Ottawa. The Hill Times file photograph
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | April 17, 2017
Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna. As a northern land that was mostly covered with thick glaciers only 10,000 years ago, Canada is not as species-rich as southern nations. Yet the conservation of these globally imperilled Canadian plants and animals is essential to protecting the richness of global species diversity, writes Dan Kraus. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | April 17, 2017
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | April 17, 2017
Canada's Environment Minister Catherine McKenna. As a northern land that was mostly covered with thick glaciers only 10,000 years ago, Canada is not as species-rich as southern nations. Yet the conservation of these globally imperilled Canadian plants and animals is essential to protecting the richness of global species diversity, writes Dan Kraus. The Hill Times photograph by Sam Garcia
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 30, 2017
By damming small creeks and streams, Canada’s five to 10 million-plus beavers build and maintain millions of acres of shallow ponds and meadows across our country. These are not only good for beavers but for other species ranging from moose to wood ducks. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 30, 2017
Opinion | BY DAN KRAUS | January 30, 2017
By damming small creeks and streams, Canada’s five to 10 million-plus beavers build and maintain millions of acres of shallow ponds and meadows across our country. These are not only good for beavers but for other species ranging from moose to wood ducks. Photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons