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Alexandrine Royer

Alexandrine Royer is a youth fellow at the Montreal Institute of Genocide and Human Right Studies.

Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | April 7, 2020
Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured during a press briefing on the coronavirus, has been preoccupied with tending to consular and diplomatic issues in relation to the global pandemic. The memory of the Rwandan genocide, in which over 800,000 people lost their lives in the space of 100 days, risks being forgotten by the global community on the International Day of Reflection, which falls on April 7, writes Alexandrine Royer of the Foundation for Genocide Education. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | April 7, 2020
Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | April 7, 2020
Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne, pictured during a press briefing on the coronavirus, has been preoccupied with tending to consular and diplomatic issues in relation to the global pandemic. The memory of the Rwandan genocide, in which over 800,000 people lost their lives in the space of 100 days, risks being forgotten by the global community on the International Day of Reflection, which falls on April 7, writes Alexandrine Royer of the Foundation for Genocide Education. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | July 1, 2019
A dystopian society where every citizen’s behaviour is closely monitored under electronic eyes is no longer a far-fetched reality. The international community must take action to stop the pervasive spread of China’s surveillance technology before more civil liberties across the globe are eroded, writes Alexandrine Royer. Screen capture image of The Washington Post's 'How China is building an all-seeing surveillance state,' published Jan. 7, 2018
Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | July 1, 2019
Opinion | BY ALEXANDRINE ROYER | July 1, 2019
A dystopian society where every citizen’s behaviour is closely monitored under electronic eyes is no longer a far-fetched reality. The international community must take action to stop the pervasive spread of China’s surveillance technology before more civil liberties across the globe are eroded, writes Alexandrine Royer. Screen capture image of The Washington Post's 'How China is building an all-seeing surveillance state,' published Jan. 7, 2018