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Books & Big Ideas
The federal NDP campaign team is stocked with experienced organizers, including people who backed Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath in 2018 and B.C. Premier John Horgan in 2017.
From British Columbia, to the East Coast, here are some of the juiciest races to keep an eye on in this campaign.
The Green Party’s Ottawa headquarters now has about 80 staffers, up from 39 before the start of the year.
Opinion|Greg Lyle
The wild card in all this will very likely be Jagmeet Singh, who will have a chance to raise the issue with Trudeau in three leaders' debates.
Opinion|Tim Powers
If you want to run for office, the easiest thing to do is effectively become a cyborg. Have no flaws; be a perfect, shareable graphic in the space that is now our political arena.
In 2018 alone, Taiwan conducted development projects in UN Sustainable Development Goal areas of interest in 39 countries. Given Taiwan’s robust experience and contributions, the UN status quo on Taiwan is absurd.
Open science partnerships are breaking the traditional pathways of research and development. While not a panacea, they pose a unique and exciting made-in-Canada solution to our pressing productivity challenges.
Books & Big Ideas
The Liberals and NDP have said price caps might be the answer, while Conservative MP Dan Albas said that would ‘knee cap’ investment.
Opinion|By Gideon Forman
Greta Thunberg's speeches are collected in this book, No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference, her first in English, at age 15 and 16, and like other great leaders, she denies she’s up to the task history has set her.  
Feature|By Kate Malloy
Daniel Pauly talks about his recently released book, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries.
Meanwhile, Melissa Rumble has been promoted to take over as director of operations to Science and Sport Minister Kirsty Duncan.
Opinion|By Sean Wilson
It’s not easy to feel optimistic about democracy these days. In his important new book, Teardown: Rebuilding Democracy from the Ground Up, activist and author Dave Meslin tackles our democratic deficit and proposes meaningful solutions that would encourage more connectivity between citizens and their governments.
Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
As in a forest, old trees fall down to make way for the new—and there are ‘a bunch of old dead trees in Ottawa’ right now, says Canadian activist Dave Meslin.
Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Understanding the history, context, and customs of Indigenous peoples goes a long way to improving Indigenous relations and achieving reconciliation, says author Bob Joseph.
Feature|By Rachel Giese
The following is an excerpt from Boys: What It Means to Become a Man, by Rachel Giese, which has been shortlisted along with four other books for this year's Writers' Trust of Canada's Shaughnessy Cohen Prize, the best political book of the year. The winner will be announced in Ottawa on May 15.
Homes: A Refugee Story, by Abu Bakr al Rabeeah and Winnie Yeung, has been shortlisted along with four other books for the Writers' Trust of Canada's 2018 Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. The winner will be announced in Ottawa on May 15 at the Politics and the Pen gala.
Feature|By Jacques Poitras
Pipe Dreams: The Fight For Canada's Energy Future, by Jacques Poitras, has been shortlisted along with four others for the Writers' Trust of Canada's 2018 Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. The winner will be announced in Ottawa on May 15 at the Politics and the Pen gala.
News|By Beatrice Paez
In The Tangled Garden: A Canadian Cultural Manifesto for the Digital Age, Richard Stursberg, the former head of English Services at CBC, looks at how Canada can provide a counterweight to the U.S.’ huge cultural influence.
The following is an excerpt from Excessive Force: Toronto's Fight to Reform City Policing, by Tim Harper and Alok Mukherjee, one of five books nominated for this year's Donner Prize, the best public policy book written by a Canadian. The winner will be announced on May 1 in Toronto.
Feature|By Harley Rustad
Big Lonely Doug, by Harley Rustad, has been shortlisted along with four others for the Writers' Trust of Canada's 2018 Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. The winner will be announced in Ottawa on May 15 at the Politics and the Pen.
Opinion|By Sean Wilson
A Mind Spread out on the Ground comes from the Mohawk phrase for depression, and the book begins with a piece on mental health that highlights the fact that self-inflicted injuries are the leading cause of death for Indigenous people under the age of 44.
Opinion|By Peter MacKinnon
The following are author-selected excerpts from University Commons Divided: Exploring Debate & Dissent on Campus, short-listed along with four other books for this year’s Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year by a Canadian. The winner will be announced on May 1 in Toronto.
The following is an excerpt from Indigenous Nationals Canadian Citizens: From First Contact to Canada 150 and Beyond, by Thomas J. Courchene, which has been shortlisted along with four other books for this year's Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year by a Canadian. The winner will be announced on May 1 in Toronto.
The following is an excerpt from Population Bombed! Exploding the Link Between Overpopulation and Climate Change, short-listed along with four other books for this year’s Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year by a Canadian. The winner will be announced on May 1 in Toronto.
Feature|By Evelyn L. Forget
The following is an excerpt from Basic Income for Canadians: The Key to a Healthier, Happier, More Secure Life For All, by Evelyn L. Forget, which has been short-listed along with four other books for this year's Donner Prize, the best public policy book of the year by a Canadian. The winner will be announced on May 1 in Toronto.
Opinion|By Sean Wilson
Anyone keen to understand the threat to democracy and wanting to consider some important steps to creating a more inclusive society will find much food for thought in David Moscrop’s incisive primer.
Opinion|By Jim Creskey
Mary Jo Leddy's Why Are We Here? A Meditation on Canada is a new book full of honest questions about Canada.
Feature|By Sean Wilson
Essentially, what the book conveys beautifully and powerfully is the idea that as long as we remain isolated in our newsfeeds and chose to interact exclusively through apps and screens, we risk losing the real connectivity that drives evolution and leads to happiness and prosperity.
Feature|By Emily Haws
Many low-level public servants don't understand how the government works more broadly, says co-author Alex Marland.
Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
‘This is unfortunately just one in a long line of cases where Canadian justice has too often been indigenous injustice,’ says author Kent Roach.

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