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PCO says use of its letterhead touting feds' more tough-on-crime bills in works an error by news wire service, now corrected

The Privy Council Office says a mistake by the news wire service it uses to disseminate government news releases led to the distribution of a politically-themed news release on Monday from Government House Leader Peter Van Loan under the letterhead of the Privy Council Office, a branch intended to serve Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his Cabinet in a non-partisan way.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The Privy Council Office is the bureaucracy behind the PMO, but it’s not supposed to be partisan. NDP MP Pat Martin criticized a recent news release on PCO letterhead describing the tough-on-crime bills in the works by the Harper government. But the PCO later said it has been mistakenly posted by Marketwire and corrected it.

 

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back to article PCO says use of its letterhead touting feds' more tough-on-crime bills in works an error by news wire service, now corrected
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PCO says use of its letterhead touting feds' more tough-on-crime bills in works an error by news wire service, now corrected

The Privy Council Office says a mistake by the news wire service it uses to disseminate government news releases led to the distribution of a politically-themed news release on Monday from Government House Leader Peter Van Loan under the letterhead of the Privy Council Office, a branch intended to serve Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his Cabinet in a non-partisan way.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The Privy Council Office is the bureaucracy behind the PMO, but it’s not supposed to be partisan. NDP MP Pat Martin criticized a recent news release on PCO letterhead describing the tough-on-crime bills in the works by the Harper government. But the PCO later said it has been mistakenly posted by Marketwire and corrected it.

 

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Sunday, March 29, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Broadbent Institute Progress Summit 2015 - Day 3 panels March 28, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Charles Taylor spoke about diversity, secularism and the path to an inclusive, progressive Quebec and Canada.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Charles Taylor did a Q&A with author Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Political philosopher Charles Taylor.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Toronto Star columnist Susan Delacourt moderated a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Kill the Messengers author Mark Bourrie spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Party of One author Mike Harris spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

University of Montreal's Frederic Merand spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Fair Vote Canada executive director Kelly Carmichael spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic panel: Kelly Carmichael, Frederic Merand, Michael Harris, Mark Bourrie and moderator Susan Delacourt.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Facebook's Kevin Chan, spoke about how Facebook can help power campaigns and engage Canadians.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Don Guy introduced the Great Debate panelists.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Armine Yalnizyan and Tom Clark, moderator of the Great Debate on Spending versus Austerity: Time to invest or cut?

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Great Debate on Spending versus Austerity: Time to invest or cut? panel: Monte Solberg, Philip Cross, Linda McQuaig, Armine Yalnizyan and Tom Clark.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Former Conservative Cabinet minister Monte Solberg, left, and former StatsCan chief analyst Philip Cross.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives economist Armine Yalnizyan.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

NDP Toronto Centre candidate and author Linda McQuaig.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Fikcle Mellennials? Progressive values and political engagement panel -- Millennial Project policy adviser David Kitching, Juno award-winning rapper and host of CBC's Q Shad, Toronto District School Board trustee Ausma Malik, University of Saskatchewan professor David McGrane and Macleans' Aaron Wherry.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Toronto District School Board trustee Ausma Malik.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

University of Saskatchewan political scientist David McGrane and Macleans' Aaron Wherry.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Juno award-winning rapper Shad, host of CBC's Q.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Carbon progress: Paris and Beyond panelists Johanne Whitmore, Gerard Fuchs, moderator Mike De Souza, Coralie Deny, and Sidney Ribaux

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE