Art and Reconciliation

Art and reconciliation: ‘It’s a way to tell a story that reaches more people’

'The arts, whether in music, especially in music from A Tribe Called Red to Tanya Tagaq, or in film or in literature or painting, it becomes something that we’re able to access a different part of our minds. We’re able to access a part of us that is sometimes a little more caring and giving,' says Joseph Boyden.

Joseph Boyden, pictured in this file photo, says, 'We’re only as good a country as how we treat our most vulnerable and our most in need. First Nations youth is the fastest growing population in our country and often times they are being put in a position of being second-class citizens. We can ignore that all we want, but there’s going to be huge repercussions if we don’t start paying attention and start actually doing something.' The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster

By BEA VONGDOUANGCHANH

PUBLISHED : Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016 12:00 AM

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