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Quebec is on course to become a two-way race between Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party and Andrew Scheer's Conservatives, with the Liberals likely eyeing NDP seats while the Conservatives eye current Bloc Québécois ridings. All four parties, along with Maxime Bernier's new venture, could be looking to Québec City and its surrounding region next election. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade

Quebec expected to be two-way race in 2019, all eyes on Québec City region, say strategists

Léger’s Christian Bourque says with the Conservative Party’s recent growth in Quebec, the ‘race is on’ between it and the Liberals for seats in the province in 2019.

Feds closing in on winning bidder for $60-billion warship project

News|By Beatrice Paez
Some industry observers say there are rumblings that the announcement on the CSC project could happen in a few weeks' time, but Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan says he hopes a decision will come 'by the end of the year.'

Conservative, NDP MPs want to make dozens of amendments to feds’ massive justice reform bill, say it’s ‘flawed’

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould's 302-page justice reform package is aimed at reducing court delays, restricting the option of preliminary inquiries to offences, and improving the jury selection process.

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Ottawa in recovery mode in wake of devastating tornadoes

The province has committed to activating its disaster recovery program to help families and businesses whose properties have been damaged.

Floor-crossing MP never raised concerns over used fighter jets purchase with procurement minister: spokesperson

News|By Neil Moss
Liberal MPs say they have 'ample' opportunity to raise concerns with party leadership and the PMO.

‘Use or lose it’: Canada’s best way to claim Arctic sovereignty

‘It’s ours,’ a DND official told a committee studying Canada’s Arctic, as experts downplayed threats posed by other countries failing to recognize our domain.

NAFTA players top Canada’s 40 most-influential foreign-policy minds

Insiders and observers weigh in on who impacts Canada’s decisions on diplomacy, trade, defence, development, and immigration.

From staffer to minister: the rise of Mary Ng

News|By Jolson Lim
In 16 months, the ex-PMO manager went from rookie backbencher to cabinet, but while some might say her connections got her where she is, she says it's 20 years of experience in government and politics.

Power to the people: Maxime Bernier turns to social networks to boost base

His People’s Party could go further than nascent political parties of the past, with social media as a means of stoking the grassroots fires, supporters suggest.

Senators, opposition MPs await Liberal response to ‘common sense’ changes to anti-harassment bill

The Senate passed Bill C-65 with seven amendments in the spring, and those along with the regulations put forward in the summer firm up the legislation, say critics.
Quebec is on course to become a two-way race between Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party and Andrew Scheer's Conservatives, with the Liberals likely eyeing NDP seats while the Conservatives eye current Bloc Québécois ridings. All four parties, along with Maxime Bernier's new venture, could be looking to Québec City and its surrounding region next election. The Hill Times photographs by Andrew Meade

Quebec expected to be two-way race in 2019, all eyes on Québec City region, say strategists

Léger’s Christian Bourque says with the Conservative Party’s recent growth in Quebec, the ‘race is on’ between it and the Liberals for seats in the province in 2019.

Voters disliked Ford a little less than Wynne

Opinion|By David Pfrimmer
Ontario election results signal Canada’s wider democratic dilemma 

We need to make better use of Toronto city staff, don’t need more politicians

Opinion|By Allan Bonner
Citizens in a democracy do need an advocate, just like a lawyer in court. But we have that advocate already on staff. They all just need to get their acts together and stick with citizens until the job is done.

CAQ’s immigration plan a caution to Scheer

Opinion|By Chantal HÉbert
The latest Léger sounding found a six-point drop in the party’s lead among the francophone voters who will determine the outcome of the election.

Slow process leaves disabled vets in a lurch: ombudsman

The time it takes to get a disability benefit decision is the most common complaint my office gets.

Lessons from the notwithstanding clause debate

Opinion|By Andrew Caddell
F.R. Scott, the man who schooled Pierre Trudeau on the Constitution, was frustrated by Section 33’s insertion in the Constitution. His words have come back to haunt us.

Every time Ford busts out the bazooka to get his way, he’s playing with fire

Opinion|By Tim Powers
Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s opponents won’t be weak forever; in fact, he could risk accelerating their rebirth if he comes across as the guy who must win every fight.

What role should the military have in the ‘war on terrorism’?

Opinion|By Phil Gurski
What was once termed the 'Global War on Terrorism' has morphed into the 'Long War,' a term that has been changed by some to the 'Eternal/Never-ending War.'

Trump’s trade war with China could start the Second Cold War

Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Yet Donald Trump's obsession is completely misplaced: 85 per cent of the seven million American manufacturing jobs lost since 2000 were eliminated by automation, not by trade.

New business coalition makes late-stage play in NAFTA talks to keep trade free

News|By Beatrice Paez
The formation of the Coalition to Keep Trade Free comes as Canada is facing an Oct. 1 deadline to sign onto the agreement struck between Mexico and the U.S.

Party leaders rally around Liberal MPs accused of being more loyal to Israel than Canada

Feature|By Neil Moss
Also, Maxime Bernier may have found a new campaign song, and the husband of Canada's newest ambassador to Poland was a Hill reporter.

Roma community campaigns for feds’ official recognition of genocide during Holocaust

News|By Beatrice Paez
When the House returns this month, the Roma community will be campaigning to convince Ottawa to formally recognize the genocide of the Roma who were targeted by the Nazis.

Bureaucrats on the move: ESDC DM leaves, feds get new chief HR officer

Feature|By Emily Haws
Nancy Chahwan takes over as chief human resources officer, which one ex-PS manager said signals the government is 'bringing in some pretty big guns' to get Phoenix fixed.

Saini leaves PMO to become chief of staff to Employment Minister Hajdu

Two former Ontario Liberal staffers recently joined the Prime Minister’s Office, and another has landed in Science and Sport Minister Kirsty Duncan’s office.

Canada’s ranter-in-chief, Rick Mercer, to release unheard diatribes

Feature|By Neil Moss
Also, PM Trudeau tries to woo the older vote with interview in Zoomer Magazine, and softball a team made up of NDP staffers are once again champions of the annual Parliament Hill Softball League.

Labour Minister Hajdu’s chief of staff now senior adviser to Defence Minister Sajjan

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Plus, Daniel Pujdak is Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett’s new director of policy.

All aboard the omnibus: new Political Party to raise funds for journalism interns

Feature|By Neil Moss
Also, party shakeups make for some unusual House seat mates, and a billboard pushes Canada to help free a Canadian's imprisoned Honduran partner.

Former Chrétien-era minister to host ‘last supper’ at Parliamentary Restaurant

Feature|By Beatrice Paez

New communications director among recent hires by Innovation Minister Bains

Feature|By Laura Ryckewaert
Plus, Hill Climbers takes a look at who’s who in the Liberal, Conservative, and NDP House Leaders and Whips offices.

Is Canada under siege from asylum seekers?

Opinion|By Donald Igbokwe
As a democratic society, we should be debating this issue. But the talk should be about safely welcoming and successfully integrating these newcomers, not whether Canada should welcome them at all.

Ratify Jay Treaty to lessen border hassles for Indigenous peoples

While the U.S. allows Indigenous peoples from Canada to freely cross south, Canada doesn’t do the same for those from the U.S. crossing north. This has caused unnecessary delays and problems at the border.

Crash course: 2008 and the divided economy

Opinion|By Lisa Van Dusen
The financial meltdown revealed the gap between numbers and reality, and between the tech masters who increasingly dominate the economy and the people whose lives they impact.

PCO clerk Wernick celebrates the bureaucracy’s best at annual awards shindig

Feature|By Emily Haws
Among those recognized for their work was a group that created a reference document to help public servants support colleagues in the transgender community.

Northern food security key to Canada’s future

Opinion|By Mary Buhr
For the sake of our global future, food security in the North is an issue requiring thoughtful investment now.

Politics This Morning: Goodale to tour areas in tornadoes’ path; Bains to take part in panel

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Karen McCrimmon, his parliamentary secretary, will be touring the areas devastated by the tornadoes that struck the Ottawa-Gatineau region.
Opinion|Chantal HÉbert 9:38 PM ET
With a bit more than a week to go to the election, it has become a mug’s game to predict the shape of the post-Oct. 1 National Assembly, writes Chantal Hébert.
Opinion|Sheila Copps
The stunt Serena Williams pulled off was nothing short of professional bullying, reminiscent of her previous threat to kill a female Asian line referee for calling a foot fault.
If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau goes around calling Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, 'a Harper clone,' he might unwittingly be giving the Conservative leader a boost.
Would it have killed them to wait a little bit, and pass their law when an election wasn’t already underway? But desperate they were, writes columnist Warren Kinsella.
Opinion|David Crane
Boosting our productivity performance so that we can raise the growth potential of the economy is—and in the process addressing income inequality and environmental sustainability.
The Senate can and should build on this learning. These are relatively small and obvious changes that are achievable as we transition to a less partisan and more independent Senate—and all would attract public support.
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New advance hired in PMO, as policy adviser exits for Liberal Research Bureau

Plus, the fisheries minister has a new parliamentary affairs director, Stephanie Choeurng.

Transport Minister Garneau scoops up Simard as new communications director

Emilie Simard, previously director of communications to the heritage minister, has joined Transport Minister Marc Garneau’s office.
Feature|Neil Moss

Monique Bégin’s new memoir, Ladies, Upstairs, hits shelves in January

Also, a communications aide to the federal justice minister recently became a Canadian, and the Supreme Court has a new executive legal officer.
Feature|Neil Moss

After MRIA’s demise, new polling industry group aims to set ‘high bar’

Plus, ex-PM Harper's book gets an early release, and Ottawa Citizen/Sun staff may strike.
Feature|Emily Haws

Shine your dancin’ shoes: here’s your guide to the fall’s hottest shindigs

On this fall's to-attend list: the Political Party, the NAC Gala, Canada's Great Kitchen Party, and the return of Harvest Noir.
Feature|Shruti Shekar

The week of France: hundreds of partygoers flock the embassy for Bastille Day, World Cup

The French Embassy opened its doors to hundreds over the course of the week for two Bastille Day events and a viewing of France's winning World Cup final match.

New office in Ottawa to show Scotland is ‘open for business’ despite Brexit disquiet, says official

Based out of the British High Commission, the new three-person team will work to pursue deeper economic ties out of both the Ottawa and Toronto offices later this month.

Royal visit ‘peak’ of Belgian envoy’s posting, despite elusive CETA stamp

Raoul Delcorde praised trade between Canada and Belgium, with both already benefitting from CETA despite its slow progress through Belgium’s regional parliaments for full ratification.

Canadian Cattlemen’s Association to host annual fall picnic in East Block’s courtyard on Sept. 25

Monday, September 24th, 2018
The Cattlemen's Association Joe Hill and Conservative MP Bev Shipley, pictured at the annual picnic in 2016. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association is hosting its annual fall picnic for Parliamentarians and will be serving Canadian beef along with all the fixings from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 25.

Conservative MP Shannon Stubbs, the party's natural resources critic, said the Liberals' announcement on Friday that instructs the National Energy Board to conduct another environmental review of the Trans Mountain pipeline's expansion impact on marine life does little to address the uncertainty around whether the project can ultimately move forward. The energy board has 22 weeks, or fewer than six months, to redo its review.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
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