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Stories by Michel Drapeau

Military rights to be affected by prorogation

Disappointingly, Bill C-77 never made it through second reading, and when Parliament prorogues, as is expected, Bill C-77 too will die. Strike two.
Bill C-77 will make the change the way the military system deals with victims and the accused.
•The interim report on the court martial comprehensive review does not instil confidence that the military justice system is working, and this should bring tremendous concern, and a sense of urgency, to Parliament that significant reform is required. •It is the duty of our Parliament and the minister of justice to be vigilant and not allow our military to operate in a vacuum. Former French prime minister Georges Clemenceau once famously quipped: 'War is too important a matter to be left to the military.' Perhaps there is a conventional wisdom to this statement, and military justice, accordingly, is also to important a matter to be left to the military.
The American, Australian, British, French and German militaries moved off mefloquine, but stubbornly the Canadian Armed Forces are not doing so.
The removal of Mark Norman from command and waning public confidence in the CAF provides an opportunity for this government to recapture its rightful control over the CAF.
Opinion|By Michel Drapeau
According to Statistics Canada, the national suicide rate for males is 17.9 suicides per 100,000 people. For 2016, the suicide rate at the RMC is akin to an astonishing rate of 400 suicides per 100,000 of population.
The Canadian military should embrace third-party oversight as an opportunity to learn and to improve.
Opinion|By Michel Drapeau
Increasingly, it is almost impossible to obtain access to substantive information in records about the federal government, particularly within statutory delays. When disclosure is actually made, it is normally rife with exclusions, exemptions and exaggerated requests for fees.
Author
Military summary trials are ancient, outdated, and unfair—and they are insulated from judicial scrutiny.
If a government is to truly effect change for all Canadians, then the private member’s bill could be a vehicle to empower voices from across the political spectrum.

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