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Stories by Ken Rubin

Massive secrecy inroads and barriers to access near approval in the Senate

Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Bill C-58 is still with the Senate to review. For the most part, it appears the Senate will go along with the government's powerful repressive practices that Bill C-58 incites.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
The public can now only catch a glimpse of what this historic house looks like when passing nearby on Sussex Drive.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Library and Archives Canada is shelling out public money to collect prime ministerial records, and keep them hidden from the public for decades.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
The government's regressive access to information bill is now in the Senate's hands, but that's not the only threat to transparency in the capital.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Too many of the signature building projects in Ottawa amount to a poor use of valuable public space.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Brison's crowning sales pitch was reserved for Bill C-58's proposal to legalize a new release system that sets some records aside that government would selectively disclose, like minister's mandate letters and expenses.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Canada's broken access to information system has increasingly become entrenched, argues Ken Rubin.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
The culture of secrecy continues under the Trudeau government.
Author
Information Commissioner Suzanne Legault, a major critic of the bill, had her term extended for two months and will be around to testify in front of a Senate committee studying the changes to the access to information regime.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Scott Brison tried to spin how great it would be that some mundane briefing lists, mandate letters, and ministers' expenses would become legally available as part of a take-it-or-leave-it government publication scheme.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
More comprehensively, covering Parliament under the Access to Information Act would have been more desirable route to go.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Seven senior federal officials, including the deputy ministers at Finance, Global Affairs, and Infrastructure, and the deputy PCO clerk, met with a 'stakeholder' corporation for a three-hour dinner discussion on how to get investment funding so the then-proposed new Canada Infrastructure Bank could work. But the government won't say who the private stakeholder was.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Fighting lengthy delays are still the norm when it comes to access-to-information requests from government.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Canada's Access to Information Act is being stalled and watered down. Meanwhile, the government is further tracking, collecting, and controlling information.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
It would be in the public interest if compensation and benefits became disclosable by law for all officials, including politicians, political aides, and political appointments. Such data should no longer be treated as personal information.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Even with this exceptional inquiry getting underway, expectations for greater and more routine disclosure under Trudeau are just not there.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
None of this was what I suggested should happen for fuller transparency.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
In order to have a greatly-strengthened data protection act, separate from access legislation, the House Privacy Committee must consider bold changes to the Privacy Act in conjunction with improving the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
It's a sure sign that it's still secrecy as usual in Ottawa when Treasury Board wants six months to respond to an access request for records about Trudeau government's transparency work.
Opinion|By Ken Rubin
Refusing to make fully public a 2015 Saudi Arabia human rights report puts a dent in his promise of ‘information by default.’ South of the border in the United States, the government annually release reports on other countries’ human rights records.

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