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Stories by Gwynne Dyer

Brexit: no turning point yet

Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The Brexiteers’ power lies in their implicit threat to stage a revolt that overthrows Ms. May, fatally splits the Conservative Party, and precipitates an early election that brings the Labour Party to power.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
English people have been marching in the streets demanding better funding for the NHS, and U.S. President Donald Trump naturally got the wrong end of the stick again.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Beijing is starting to see U.S. trade policy as part of a deliberate attempt to stop China’s emergence as a great industrial and technological power, writes columnist Gwynne Dyer.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Even for women, things are very gradually getting better: 60 per cent of Saudi university graduates are female, and now they can drive too. But the country is now being run by an erratic and over-confident dictator.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Andrés Manuel López Obrador has little to say about the drug war, apart from vague talk about giving some criminals an amnesty, writes columnist Gwynne Dyer. What he concentrates on is inequality.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
About half of Turkey’s voters still want the secular state they used to have, which means that Mr. Erdogan’s ostentatious piety and strident promotion of political Islam alienate almost as many voters as they seduce.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
One factor aggravating the situation in Europe is that only a few of the EU’s 28 countries are carrying almost all of the burden: Italy, Spain, Greece, and Germany, writes columnist Gwynne Dyer.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
No jumped-up leader of a rinky-dink country like Canada was going to get away with talking to the president of the United States like that.
Author
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
It was a show, staged for the benefit of the two main participants, and they both got what they came for. They were bound to get it, since they had the power to define the meeting as either a success or a failure.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Over the past decade, this hard-line approach has delivered an annual average of 10 per cent economic growth in Ethiopia, far higher than in South Africa or Nigeria.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The Putin regime condemned the episode as "fake news," and will have much more credibility the next time it needs to deny killing a critic, writes columnist Gwynne Dyer.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
No promises, but this actually could happen. And if Trump and Kim did get the Nobel Peace Prize for it, so what? It’s meant as a reward for saints, but it works just as well as bait for scoundrels.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Powerful opponents of the Ortega-Murillo family within the Sandinista party have been systematically weeded out of the government.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The 15 per cent slowdown is not necessarily an indicator that the whole northern branch of the current is on the brink of shutting down. But then again, it might be.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
There is actually a good chance that the new coalition will survive, at least for a while, because it is based on the ancient principle that 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend.' The enemy the two parties have in common.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
If he acts now, he would give the country a second chance to become what it could be: a prosperous, spectacularly multi-cultural Asian version of Switzerland (without the mountains, of course).
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Iran is a country the size of Alaska, two-thirds of it is mountain or desert, and it has 80 million people, lots of industry and good science and technology. Invading it would make the Vietnam war look like a tea party. So any ground fighting between Iran and its enemies would be more likely to happen in the countries between them: Syria and Iraq.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
What really drives Trump’s hatred of the deal, in all likelihood, is simply the fact that it was one of Obama’s major successes—what Macron referred to as 'domestic reasons.' It fits a pattern.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The Kim dynasty inherited a devastated country at the end of the Korean War in 1953. Its cities were levelled and at least a million people had been killed. The Chinese troops who had helped North Korea went home after the war, but the American troops stayed in South Korea. Moreover, the Americans had nuclear weapons and would not promise not to use them—and there was no peace treaty, just an armistice.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Former South Korean president Park Geun-hye was sentenced to 24 years in prison last week, former South African president Jacob Zuma is facing corruption charges, and former Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva began serving a 12-year jail term for corruption.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Eugenio Scalfari doesn’t mind the fact that the Vatican subsequently denies what he reported the Pope said, and that Francis himself tacitly goes along with that denial. It’s a game that both men play, and the accuracy of Scalfari’s reports is amply demonstrated by the fact that Francis keeps giving him more interviews despite his alleged ‘mis-reporting’ of previous ones.  
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Is Iran actually supplying missiles to the Houthis that are being fired at Saudi Arabia? If so, then the United States, Saudi Arabia’s main ally, has an excuse to attack Iran.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
'Now mass media are everywhere, and even the dictators have to pretend that they are in power by the will of the people,' writes Gwynne Dyer.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Although Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte occasionally talks about abolishing the Congress and leading a self-appointed 'revolutionary government,' he is unlikely to be able to carry it off, because by then he won’t be popular any more. The Philippines will not prosper under his rule.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
'Self-driving vehicles will no doubt occasionally make mistakes that hurt human beings, but computer programs are bound to be less erratic on the roads than human beings.'
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
And stand by for Trump to alienate all of America’s main allies by sabotaging a treaty they worked very hard to achieve. Since he has swallowed Saudi Arabia’s argument that Iran is an 'expansionist' power that must be stopped, even direct military clashes between the U.S. and Iran, especially in Syria, become a lot more likely.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The era of adult supervision in the White House is coming to an end, and Donald Trump is more and more 'free to be Donald.'
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
'Trump’s main goal is to look good—to get a ‘win’—and Kim’s advisers will have told him to let Trump win something.'
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
One of the big winners in last Sunday’s Italian election was the Five-Star Movement, whose 31-year-old leader Luigi di Maio has promised to stop sending out rescue boats to save migrants from drowning when their flimsy craft sink halfway across the Mediterranean.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Xi is not likely to 'do a Mao' and unleash chaos in China. He is intelligent and he works hard. But the mistakes will accumulate nevertheless, and stagnation awaits.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The great unanswered question is: how would a post-Putin Russia revive the democratic experiment it embarked on in 1989-91, in the face of certain opposition from the oligarchs who benefit so greatly from current arrangements? We may find out in the 2024 election, when Putin again comes up against the two-term limit.

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