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Stories by Gwynne Dyer

Saving the old amid the pandemic

Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Achieving herd immunity requires 60 per cent-70 per cent of the population to have had the disease—and with this particular coronavirus, about one or two percent of those people will die.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Or at least they should. COVID-19 is certainly not going to change the world forever, but it is going to change quite a few things, in some cases for a long time.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Collective action and government protection for the old and the poor will no longer be viewed as dangerous radicalism, even in the United States.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Unless this particular coronavirus fails to cause a second wave of infections next winter, we will probably be stuck in lockdown most of the time until an effective vaccine becomes widely available.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
In every country, we have collectively decided, without even an argument, that we care more about the lives of our fellow citizens than we do about the damned economy.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
He probably just prefers a policy that does not cripple the economy, and doesn’t understand the implications, writes columnist Gwynne Dyer.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
That Israel could be a democratic state where every citizen has an equal say or an apartheid state where most Arabs are subjects, not citizens, but it can’t be both.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Folklore, superstitions, and old wives’ tales abound in every culture, but beliefs about the power of jinbu are unique to China, and explain why eating specific wild animals plays a major role in Chinese medicine.
Author
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
History does not repeat, but it does have patterns, and there are disturbing similarities.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Maesaiah Thabane, wife of Prime Minister Thomas Thabane and therefore First Lady of Lesotho, is charged with ordering the murder of his previous wife three years ago, and he’s accused of being her accomplice.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The whistleblowers are among our last remaining checks on the contemptuous ease with which those who control the information seek to manipulate the rest of us.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
This could end up as a major war, and since Turkey can easily block Russian ships heading for the Mediterranean, Russian victory would not be quick or easy. But they would win in the end, as they always do.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The Japanese planners were foolish to put four reactors on the coast in a region where earthquakes and consequent tsunamis were to be expected from time to time.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
This political revolution is not driven by Irish nationalism. Few of the people who voted for Sinn Féin cared much about the North, or unification, or any of that old stuff.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
A black swan is an unforeseen event that has a huge impact on the normal course of events. The SARS epidemic in 2002-03 was a black swan: it knocked about two percentage points off China’s economic growth that year.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Bernie Sanders may frighten as many voters as he excites.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
There was no need to have any Palestinians at the great unveiling of the Trump-Netanyahu ‘peace deal’ on Jan. 28. Palestinian consent is not necessary, and when they reject it they can be vilified for rejecting ‘peace.'
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The Chinese doctors will do their duty, as always, but it would be nice if China had its political act a bit more together before then.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Even if we finally start taking serious measures against global warming now, a lot of people are going to die from the damage that has already been done: millions at least, and possibly a great many more than that.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Russians sometimes call themselves 'Italians of the North,' and they don’t mean it in a good way. So he wants a strong state, run with a firm hand, even after he has retired, which means that a clear succession.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The deadline between Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan passed on Jan. 15. Now the dispute goes to the three heads of government to agree on a mediator—and if they can’t agree, maybe we’ll see our first real 'water war.'
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
All these shoot-downs are fundamentally a political and military phenomenon, not a technical malfunction or mere human error.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Donald Trump is belatedly frightened by the potential consequences of his impulsive order to kill Qassem Soleimani, and he’s trying to threaten his way out of an open U.S.-Iran war.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Stalin was a complete idiot to trust Hitler, but went on supplying Germany with oil and various other scarce goods until the day before Germany invaded Russia in June 1941. It’s not a story that reflects well on Russia, so it’s no wonder that Putin keeps trying to change the narrative.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The best that can be said about COP25 is that they stopped a concerted attempt by the biggest emitters, led by Brazil and Australia, to gut the proposed rules for a global carbon market.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The relationship will stay very cool, because Russian popular opinion would never allow Putin to hand back Crimea.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
It has now become clear that Saudi Arabia is never going to win.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
The alleged Russian threat is still the glue that holds the alliance together, but French President Emmanuel Macron doesn’t believe in that.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Which way will it go? Impossible to say, but a major obstacle to a negotiated outcome is that the protesters have deliberately avoided having recognized leaders.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Governments have been making these promises since the early 1990s, and they are never kept because the political pressures are far stronger from those who profit in the present.
Opinion|By Gwynne Dyer
Maybe the fossil fuel industries can at least deflect and divert the pressure for effective action on climate change on to targets that do not directly threaten the sales of their products.

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