Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014
SUBSCRIBE | LOG IN
Sign up for the free daily email

Harper’s Cabinet need not have any background facts, reinforces greater Cabinet secrecy

By eliminating the background analysis component of MCs, what the current PM has ensured, with mandarin support, is that Cabinet records themselves have now become more sanitized, compromised, and even more brazenly secret.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The PMO: Canada is stuck on excluding a broad array of records as Cabinet ‘confidences.’ This has set the tone and provided cover for a general culture of secrecy. Yet when Cabinet records are released after 20 years, it’s hard to see what the fuss is all about. The vast majority of such records are sanitized summary data, pretty mundane, and hardly contain the full and frank discussions reputed to be in them.

 

To View the rest of this article, please choose one of the following

If you are already a subscriber

Subscribe to The Hill Times

Subscribe to the print and electronic editions and get instant access to The Hill Times online.


Quick Purchase

Purchase this weeks' edition of The Hill Times in electronic format (PDF) for $4.00


Sign Up for a free trial

For access to the website.



back to article Harper’s Cabinet need not have any background facts, reinforces greater Cabinet secrecy
Editor’s Note: Comments that appear on the site are not the opinion of The Hill Times. Personal attacks, name-calling, offensive language, and unsubstantiated allegations are not allowed.
For more information on our commenting policies, please see our Community Discussion Rules page. If you see a typo or error in a story, report it to us here news@hilltimes.com.

Harper’s Cabinet need not have any background facts, reinforces greater Cabinet secrecy

By eliminating the background analysis component of MCs, what the current PM has ensured, with mandarin support, is that Cabinet records themselves have now become more sanitized, compromised, and even more brazenly secret.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The PMO: Canada is stuck on excluding a broad array of records as Cabinet ‘confidences.’ This has set the tone and provided cover for a general culture of secrecy. Yet when Cabinet records are released after 20 years, it’s hard to see what the fuss is all about. The vast majority of such records are sanitized summary data, pretty mundane, and hardly contain the full and frank discussions reputed to be in them.

 

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Tuesday, September 30, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Parliament Buildings' multi-billion-dollar renovation and construction: in photographs, by Liban Mohamed Sept. 23, 2014

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

Third year civil engineering student, Liban Mohamed, a co-op student with Public Works this summer, tweeted this photo from the West Block. This is the excavation work to construct the West Block's portion of the new underground Visitors' Welcome Centre.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

Workers loading a fixture onto a construction elevator destined to top a chimney on the West Block's Mackenzie Tower.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

The secret staircase inside the Mackenzie Tower is named after Alexander Mackenzie, Canada's second prime minister. Mackenzie, whose office was in West Block, was apparently leery of lobbyists and used the secret staircase as an escape route.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

Copper roofing and metal vents near the top of the West Block's Mackenzie Tower, named after Alexander Mackenzie, Canada's second prime minister and first Liberal prime minister. Mackenzie, who was in office from 1873 to 1878, had his office in West Block. The Mackenzie Tower, the building's tallest tower, also to be completely dismantled and rebuilt as part of the restoration work.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

Small copper-rimmed windows set to be installed on the West Block's Mackenzie Tower. The West Block is one of four Parliament Buildings under construction as part of the Public Works' multi-billion-dollar rehabilitation project. It's expected to cost $2.64-billion by 2018. West Block's renovation is expected to cost $863-million and is expected to be completed in 2018.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

A worker wearing rubber gloves for protection is pictured cleaning West Block masonry with a toothbrush.

The Hill Times photograph courtesy of Liban Mohamed

A rooftop view of the West Block's courtyard, which is currently being excavated for construction of the $115-million glass-domed infill that will be the temporary home to the House Chamber beginning in 2018.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE