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Broadbent Institute schedule

Delta Ottawa City Centre
101, rue Lyon N
Friday, March 28th
Registration Opens |     8:00
Main Lobby
Coffee & Continental Breakfast |     8:30 – 9:30
Grand Salon – Joliet Room
Pre-Summit Training and Leadership session | 9:30 – 12:00
Grand Salon
Mitch Stewart, Founding Partner, 270 Strategies
Graham Mitchell, Director of Training and Leadership, Broadbent Institute
Box Lunch |     12:00 – 1:00
Grand Salon – Joliet Room
Leadership Training |     1:00 – 4:30
Grand Salon
Mitch Stewart, Founding Partner, 270 Strategies
Graham Mitchell, Director of Training and Leadership, Broadbent Institute
Welcome Reception |     6:00 – 8:00
Penthouse: Pinnacle & Panorama Rooms
Welcome remarks from Ed Broadbent and Rick Smith
Food stations
Open Bar (wine and beer)
Saturday, March 29th
Registration open for Summit |     8:00
Welcome |     8:30
Welcome from Chief Gilbert Whiteduck (Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation) and Chief Kirby Whiteduck (Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation)
Welcoming address by Ed Broadbent, Chair, Broadbent Institute
Welcome video
Location: Main Ballroom
Keynote #1: The Entrepreneurial State — mission-oriented government for smart, green and inclusive growth          9:10 – 10:30
Speaker: Mariana Mazzucato, Author of
The Entrepreneurial State
Topic: Ms. Mazzucato will present her bold case for an activist state in the economy and the role of government in driving innovation. Contrary to conventional wisdom, she will argue that government, not the risk-averse venture capital firms of the private sector, is behind the boldest risks and biggest breakthroughs.  Using examples from biotech, greentech, and even the iPhone, Ms. Mazzucato will demonstrate why the state’s entrepreneurialism is so vital.She will challenge us to think about what sort of society we want to live in and what role public sector leadership must play..
Response panelists:
Erica Alini, Deputy Editor at Monitor Global Outlook
David G. Watt, Chief Economist, HSBC Canada
Désirée  McGraw, Co-Founder, Climate Reality Canada and Executive Director, Jeanne Sauvé Foundation
Moderator: Bruce Campbell, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Location: Main Ballroom
Coffee break |     10:30 – 10:45
Panel # 1: The (good) business of building a green economy           10:45 -12:00
One vision of Canada’s economic future is as an “energy superpower” mostly reliant on the export of fossil fuels as a key driver of economic growth.  This panel will explore the economic case for a different pathway — a green economy that goes beyond improving efficiencies or making minor cosmetic improvements to ‘business as usual.’  The panel will examine the proper role for governments, the private and third sectors in the transition to a green economy and the most effective ways to spur innovation and foster greener growth.  
Panelists:
Chris Ragan, Associate Professor, Macroeconomics and Economic Policy, McGill University
Bruce Lourie, President, Ivey Foundation
Clare Demerse, Director of Federal Policy, Pembina Institute, Broadbent Fellow
Tom Rand, Cleantech Advisor, MaRS Institute
Moderator: Jeremy Runnals, Managing Editor, Corporate Knights
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #2:  Indigenous Rights and the Challenge of Natural Resource Development    10:45 -12:00
The debate over resource development and the opportunities and challenges it presents Canada’s indigenous communities is a contentious one. Given the reality that pressure for natural resource development will continue, what does a just pathway forward look like? Tackling issues related to self-governance, treaty and land rights, and balancing social and economic development with environmental sustainability, this panel addresses timely topics such as oil pipelines, resource extraction (especially in the North), job creation, and reconciliation in Crown-Aboriginal relations.  
Panelists:
Hayden King, Director, Centre for Indigenous Governance; Assistant Professor of Politics, Ryerson University
Melina Laboucan Massimo, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace
Chris Henderson, Chairman, Lumos Energy and author of Aboriginal Power
Moderator: Frances Abele, Professor of Public Policy, Carleton University, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel #3: Lessons from Quebec’s vibrant social economy          10:45 -12:00
This session discusses the concept of the social economy within the broader context of today’s prevailing economic logic. It tells the story behind Quebec’s emergent social economy movement and the key lessons Canada and the world can learn from the experience of the province. Speaking to the movement’s transformative ambition to democratize the economy, panelists will discuss the kind of coalition and capacity building that took place thatset the stage for the significant institutional changes achieved.
Panelists:
Margie Mendell, Professor and Graduate Program Director, Concordia University School of Community and Public Affairs
Isabelle Coulombe, advisor (education service), FTQ Solidarity Fund
Patrick Duguay, Director of the Coopérative de développement régional Outaouais-Laurentides
Karine Awashish, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission
Moderator: Nancy Neamtan, Executive Director of Chantier de l’économie sociale, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Panorama room
Keynote #2: The rise of the right: France, Europe, and the progressive challenge     1:00 – 2:00
Keynote: Axelle Lemaire, French National Assemblywoman for Northern Europe
Topic: Axelle Lemaire will discuss the opportunities facing social democratic parties and governments as Europe approaches a series of elections where far-right wing parties are poised to make significant gains.  Speaking to her experiences as a legislator in the National Assembly in France, she will discuss the challenge progressives have had getting across their message on the economy in the wake of the financial crisis, and will offer her vision for how the left can re-capture support in Europe.  Mme. Lemaire will also discuss her connection to Quebec and to Canada and the role her roots played in shaping her political orientation and imagination.  
Q&A with: Martin Patriquin, Maclean’s magazine
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #4: A “New Deal” for Young People | 2:00 – 3:00
Many fear that youth today face a future less hopeful than their parents. But is the inter-generational angst warranted?  The statistics are certainly sobering with youth unemployment double the national average and the crisis worse among Aboriginal young people.  But the challenges run deeper than employment. This session will examine the difficulties facing Canada’s younger generations and react to new polling from the Broadbent Institute that shows unease across generations with current economic policies tilted towards the needs of corporations.  It will discuss ideas for what a ‘new deal’ for Canadian youth should look like.  
Panelists:
Gabriel Bran Lopez, Founding President, Youth Fusion, Co-founder of FIRST Robotics Quebec
Johanna Uekermann, Chairwoman of the Young Socialists in the German SPD (Social Democratic Party)
Max FineDay, President, University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union
Sean Geobey, Research Manager at the Waterloo Institute for Social Innovation and Resilience and McConnell Fellow at SiG @Waterloo
Moderator:   Lyndsay Poaps, engagement specialist
Location: Ballroom
Panel #5: The best defence is a good offence: the federal attack on the labour movement | 2:00 – 3:00
Few would dispute that the labour movement is under unprecedented attack by the federal government. The Conservatives have shown a penchant for using back-to-work legislation to block the collective bargaining process and have introduced retrograde anti-union laws in Bills’ C-377 and C-525. Discussing these and other attacks in the context of a broader demonization of unions and attempt to undermine their engagement in “political” activities, this session will discuss what the labour movement can do to better make its case, organize and fight back.
Panelists:
Nora Loreto, author, From Demonized to Organized: Building the New Union Movement
Denis Lemelin, National President, Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Elizabeth Woods, Regional representative, National Capital Region, PSAC
Roxane Larouche, Director, National Communications Office, UFCW
Moderator: Sylvain Schetagne, National Director of Social and Economic Policy, Canadian Labour Congress
Language: French with full simultaneous translation
Panel #6: Precarious, low benefit work: the new normal? | 3:15 - 4:30
For many in Canada, economic insecurity is commonplace. But is the precarious work trap inevitable? This panel will discuss the factors contributing to the growing share of precarious work and why certain groups are more adversely impacted than others.  It will also explore what labour market reforms and other policy instruments must be adopted to combat this trend.  Discussing the proper role of government, unions and the private sector in bringing about change, the panel will explore the “skills shortage”, employment insurance reform, and the controversial Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) among other issues.
Panelists:
Sheila Block, Director, Economic Analysis, Wellesley Institute
Jamison Steeve, Executive, Director, Martin Prosperity Institute, Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity
Patti Tamara Lenard, Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa, Broadbent Fellow
Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University, Broadbent Fellow
Moderator: Angella MacEwen, Senior Economist, Canadian Labour Congress, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel #7: Income inequality and austerity: political choices and policy options     3:15 - 4:30
The inequality debate in Canada is far from settled.  While there is broad recognition that inequality is a problem, there is little agreement that in supposedly austere times, we can afford to do anything about it.  Most experts agree that the fading of Canada’s redistributive state and concentration of wealth at the top is due at least in part to political choices.  This session will discuss what political choices must be made today to reverse the tide.  It will ask not only what solutions to income inequality are ideal, but which can find support with an electorate conditioned to be skeptical of taxes, government services and spending.
Panelists:
Don Drummond, Matthews Fellow in Global Public Policy, Adjunct Professor, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University
Alex Himelfarb, Director of Glendon School of Public and International Affairs, York University, Broadbent Fellow
Janine Brodie, Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in Political Economy and Social Governance, University of Alberta, Broadbent Fellow
Eve-Lyne Couturier, Researcher, Institut de Recherche et d’informations socio-economique
Moderator: Paul Adams, former political reporter, CBC and The Globe and Mail; Professor of Journalism, Carleton University
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #8: Bridging online and offline campaigning             3:15 - 4:30
The rise of social media and digital technologies has transformed how campaigns today are imagined, organized and executed. This panel will explore how campaigns use digital organizing tools to effectively mobilize offline action, and speaks to the potential for those tools to be harnessed to create real-world change.
Panelists:
Julia Pope, Director of External Relations, Leadnow
Simon Lafrance, Managing Partner, Strategeum
Jason Mogus, Principal Consultant, Communicopia, Broadbent Fellow
Jennifer Hollett, Digital strategist, Award-winning broadcast journalist, Broadbent Fellow
Moderator: Susan Delacourt, Senior Political Writer, Toronto Star
Location: Panorama Room
Coffee break      4:30 – 4:45
Keynote #3: Leadership and Purpose: Progressive Politics for Today and Tomorrow      4:45 – 6:00
Keynote: Julia Gillard, past Prime Minister of Australia
Focus:  Ms. Gillard will discuss the core challenge facing progressive governments: the premium on creating jobs, balancing sustainability and resource development, and the key environmental, business and labour issues that underpin that challenge.  She will speak specifically to the global climate challenge issue and to her government’s introduction of a carbon tax. Ms. Gillard will also discuss lessons for leadership in these times, including those drawn from her prime ministership and to the salient subject of barriers confronting women in political leadership.  Finally, Ms Gillard will discuss the overall ties and relations between Australia and Canada.
Q&A: Paul Wells, Political Editor, Maclean’s Magazine
Location: Main Ballroom
MediaStyle hospitality suite |     18:00
Broadbent Institute and Equal Voice celebrate Australia’s first female Prime Minister Julia Gillard     18:15
21:00 – 1:00: Shimmy to the Left – Saturday night social
-Featuring artists Sarah Harmer, Sally Folk and Blurred Vision
Sunday March 30th
Opening Remarks | Presentation of Contest Award             9:00 – 9:30
Location: Main Ballroom
Presentation of Income splitting: the Mad Men Giveaway contest award
Broadbent Senior Policy Advisor, Andrew Jackson
Contest winner: Sarah Ryan
Panel #9: Getting our act together:  lessons from winning progressive campaigns in the US and Canada              9:30 – 10:45
Progress doesn’t happen on its own, and neither good ideas nor policy implement themselves. Convincing the public and influencing decision-makers to move forward with solutions to pressing issues requires effective advocacy and compelling campaigns. Drawing on lessons from previous progressive victories, panelists in this session will share their perspectives from Canada and the US on the most important resources, skills, and assets that the progressive movement needs in order to win on important progressive issues.
Panelists:
Erik Peterson, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Wellstone
Ashley Pinedo, National Training Director, Organizing for Action
Tzeporah Berman, author and environmental campaigner, Broadbent Fellow
Ray Guardia, Deputy Chief of Staff, Projet Montréal
Moderator: Kathleen Monk, Senior Advisor, Broadbent Institute
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #10 Good jobs and fair wages: can “pre-distribution” solve growing income inequality?              9:30 – 10:45
Much of the debate over addressing income inequality focuses on the tax and transfer system and the need to redistribute market income.  While vitally important, this panel will discuss an often-neglected side of the equation: fixing inequality in the initial distribution of wages, salaries and investment income. It will discuss the need for labour market reforms, the role of unions, and the need for better corporate governance.
Panelists:
Lars Osberg, Professor of Economics, Dalhousie University, Broadbent Fellow
Marc Lavoie, Professor of Economics at University of Ottawa, Broadbent Fellow
Armine Yalnizyan, Senior Economist at Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Peter Macleod, Principle, Mass LBP and founding director, Wagemark foundation
Moderator: Tom Walkom, Toronto Star National Affairs columnist
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel#9 Making things: the Future of Manufacturing in Canada     9:30 – 10:45
Most agree that Canada must invest heavily in innovation and skills in order to support the high wage jobs manufacturing typically provides. But there is fierce debate over what mix of government support and corporate investment is needed to generate those new winning sectors.  This session explores what role manufacturing should play in a 21st century Canadian economy, and asks why Canadians should care.  Debating controversial factors in manufacturing’s decline, it asks what policy levers must be pulled to transform manufacturing moving forward.  
Panelists:
Matt Mendelsohn, Director, Mowat Centre
Jordan Brennan, Economist UNIFOR
Ross Hornby, Vice President, Government Affairs and Policy, General Electric Canada
Sandra Schwartz, Vice President, External Relations and Communications, Canadian Electricity Association
Moderator: Heather Scoffield, Ottawa Bureau Chief, Canadian Press
Location: Panorama
Coffee break |     10:45 – 11:15
Keynote #4:  Winning hearts, minds, and clicks|             11:15 – 12:30
Speaker: Anastasia Khoo, Marketing Director, Human Rights Campaign
Focus: Anastasia Khoo knows a thing or two about effective digital engagement and campaigning. Khoo spearheaded the Human Rights Campaign’s viral red marriage equality initiative last year that saw Facebook turn red with the HRC’s equal sign logo breaking Twitter’s record for highest engagement on a tweet. Speaking to that campaign, Khoo will discuss what was really behind the incredible digital engagement numbers that helped tip the scales of public opinion and usher in a major progressive victory on marriage equality: personal stories and relationships. Khoo will outline the arc of this progressive victory and draw lessons for future campaigns. She will also speak to the significance of Canada’s LGBTQ track record and what Canada’s leadership on these issues continues to mean in the ongoing battle for equality worldwide.   
Panel response:
Elizabeth Plank, Executive Social Editor, PolicyMic
Jamie Biggar, Executive Director of Leadnow
Ian Capstick, President of MediaStyle
Moderator: Mira Oreck, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Broadbent Institute
Location: Main Ballroom
Concluding Remarks:     12:30
Rick Smith, Executive Director, Broadbent Institute
Main Ballroom

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Broadbent Institute schedule

Delta Ottawa City Centre
101, rue Lyon N
Friday, March 28th
Registration Opens |     8:00
Main Lobby
Coffee & Continental Breakfast |     8:30 – 9:30
Grand Salon – Joliet Room
Pre-Summit Training and Leadership session | 9:30 – 12:00
Grand Salon
Mitch Stewart, Founding Partner, 270 Strategies
Graham Mitchell, Director of Training and Leadership, Broadbent Institute
Box Lunch |     12:00 – 1:00
Grand Salon – Joliet Room
Leadership Training |     1:00 – 4:30
Grand Salon
Mitch Stewart, Founding Partner, 270 Strategies
Graham Mitchell, Director of Training and Leadership, Broadbent Institute
Welcome Reception |     6:00 – 8:00
Penthouse: Pinnacle & Panorama Rooms
Welcome remarks from Ed Broadbent and Rick Smith
Food stations
Open Bar (wine and beer)
Saturday, March 29th
Registration open for Summit |     8:00
Welcome |     8:30
Welcome from Chief Gilbert Whiteduck (Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation) and Chief Kirby Whiteduck (Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation)
Welcoming address by Ed Broadbent, Chair, Broadbent Institute
Welcome video
Location: Main Ballroom
Keynote #1: The Entrepreneurial State — mission-oriented government for smart, green and inclusive growth          9:10 – 10:30
Speaker: Mariana Mazzucato, Author of
The Entrepreneurial State
Topic: Ms. Mazzucato will present her bold case for an activist state in the economy and the role of government in driving innovation. Contrary to conventional wisdom, she will argue that government, not the risk-averse venture capital firms of the private sector, is behind the boldest risks and biggest breakthroughs.  Using examples from biotech, greentech, and even the iPhone, Ms. Mazzucato will demonstrate why the state’s entrepreneurialism is so vital.She will challenge us to think about what sort of society we want to live in and what role public sector leadership must play..
Response panelists:
Erica Alini, Deputy Editor at Monitor Global Outlook
David G. Watt, Chief Economist, HSBC Canada
Désirée  McGraw, Co-Founder, Climate Reality Canada and Executive Director, Jeanne Sauvé Foundation
Moderator: Bruce Campbell, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Location: Main Ballroom
Coffee break |     10:30 – 10:45
Panel # 1: The (good) business of building a green economy           10:45 -12:00
One vision of Canada’s economic future is as an “energy superpower” mostly reliant on the export of fossil fuels as a key driver of economic growth.  This panel will explore the economic case for a different pathway — a green economy that goes beyond improving efficiencies or making minor cosmetic improvements to ‘business as usual.’  The panel will examine the proper role for governments, the private and third sectors in the transition to a green economy and the most effective ways to spur innovation and foster greener growth.  
Panelists:
Chris Ragan, Associate Professor, Macroeconomics and Economic Policy, McGill University
Bruce Lourie, President, Ivey Foundation
Clare Demerse, Director of Federal Policy, Pembina Institute, Broadbent Fellow
Tom Rand, Cleantech Advisor, MaRS Institute
Moderator: Jeremy Runnals, Managing Editor, Corporate Knights
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #2:  Indigenous Rights and the Challenge of Natural Resource Development    10:45 -12:00
The debate over resource development and the opportunities and challenges it presents Canada’s indigenous communities is a contentious one. Given the reality that pressure for natural resource development will continue, what does a just pathway forward look like? Tackling issues related to self-governance, treaty and land rights, and balancing social and economic development with environmental sustainability, this panel addresses timely topics such as oil pipelines, resource extraction (especially in the North), job creation, and reconciliation in Crown-Aboriginal relations.  
Panelists:
Hayden King, Director, Centre for Indigenous Governance; Assistant Professor of Politics, Ryerson University
Melina Laboucan Massimo, Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace
Chris Henderson, Chairman, Lumos Energy and author of Aboriginal Power
Moderator: Frances Abele, Professor of Public Policy, Carleton University, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel #3: Lessons from Quebec’s vibrant social economy          10:45 -12:00
This session discusses the concept of the social economy within the broader context of today’s prevailing economic logic. It tells the story behind Quebec’s emergent social economy movement and the key lessons Canada and the world can learn from the experience of the province. Speaking to the movement’s transformative ambition to democratize the economy, panelists will discuss the kind of coalition and capacity building that took place thatset the stage for the significant institutional changes achieved.
Panelists:
Margie Mendell, Professor and Graduate Program Director, Concordia University School of Community and Public Affairs
Isabelle Coulombe, advisor (education service), FTQ Solidarity Fund
Patrick Duguay, Director of the Coopérative de développement régional Outaouais-Laurentides
Karine Awashish, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission
Moderator: Nancy Neamtan, Executive Director of Chantier de l’économie sociale, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Panorama room
Keynote #2: The rise of the right: France, Europe, and the progressive challenge     1:00 – 2:00
Keynote: Axelle Lemaire, French National Assemblywoman for Northern Europe
Topic: Axelle Lemaire will discuss the opportunities facing social democratic parties and governments as Europe approaches a series of elections where far-right wing parties are poised to make significant gains.  Speaking to her experiences as a legislator in the National Assembly in France, she will discuss the challenge progressives have had getting across their message on the economy in the wake of the financial crisis, and will offer her vision for how the left can re-capture support in Europe.  Mme. Lemaire will also discuss her connection to Quebec and to Canada and the role her roots played in shaping her political orientation and imagination.  
Q&A with: Martin Patriquin, Maclean’s magazine
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #4: A “New Deal” for Young People | 2:00 – 3:00
Many fear that youth today face a future less hopeful than their parents. But is the inter-generational angst warranted?  The statistics are certainly sobering with youth unemployment double the national average and the crisis worse among Aboriginal young people.  But the challenges run deeper than employment. This session will examine the difficulties facing Canada’s younger generations and react to new polling from the Broadbent Institute that shows unease across generations with current economic policies tilted towards the needs of corporations.  It will discuss ideas for what a ‘new deal’ for Canadian youth should look like.  
Panelists:
Gabriel Bran Lopez, Founding President, Youth Fusion, Co-founder of FIRST Robotics Quebec
Johanna Uekermann, Chairwoman of the Young Socialists in the German SPD (Social Democratic Party)
Max FineDay, President, University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union
Sean Geobey, Research Manager at the Waterloo Institute for Social Innovation and Resilience and McConnell Fellow at SiG @Waterloo
Moderator:   Lyndsay Poaps, engagement specialist
Location: Ballroom
Panel #5: The best defence is a good offence: the federal attack on the labour movement | 2:00 – 3:00
Few would dispute that the labour movement is under unprecedented attack by the federal government. The Conservatives have shown a penchant for using back-to-work legislation to block the collective bargaining process and have introduced retrograde anti-union laws in Bills’ C-377 and C-525. Discussing these and other attacks in the context of a broader demonization of unions and attempt to undermine their engagement in “political” activities, this session will discuss what the labour movement can do to better make its case, organize and fight back.
Panelists:
Nora Loreto, author, From Demonized to Organized: Building the New Union Movement
Denis Lemelin, National President, Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Elizabeth Woods, Regional representative, National Capital Region, PSAC
Roxane Larouche, Director, National Communications Office, UFCW
Moderator: Sylvain Schetagne, National Director of Social and Economic Policy, Canadian Labour Congress
Language: French with full simultaneous translation
Panel #6: Precarious, low benefit work: the new normal? | 3:15 - 4:30
For many in Canada, economic insecurity is commonplace. But is the precarious work trap inevitable? This panel will discuss the factors contributing to the growing share of precarious work and why certain groups are more adversely impacted than others.  It will also explore what labour market reforms and other policy instruments must be adopted to combat this trend.  Discussing the proper role of government, unions and the private sector in bringing about change, the panel will explore the “skills shortage”, employment insurance reform, and the controversial Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) among other issues.
Panelists:
Sheila Block, Director, Economic Analysis, Wellesley Institute
Jamison Steeve, Executive, Director, Martin Prosperity Institute, Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity
Patti Tamara Lenard, Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa, Broadbent Fellow
Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University, Broadbent Fellow
Moderator: Angella MacEwen, Senior Economist, Canadian Labour Congress, Broadbent Fellow
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel #7: Income inequality and austerity: political choices and policy options     3:15 - 4:30
The inequality debate in Canada is far from settled.  While there is broad recognition that inequality is a problem, there is little agreement that in supposedly austere times, we can afford to do anything about it.  Most experts agree that the fading of Canada’s redistributive state and concentration of wealth at the top is due at least in part to political choices.  This session will discuss what political choices must be made today to reverse the tide.  It will ask not only what solutions to income inequality are ideal, but which can find support with an electorate conditioned to be skeptical of taxes, government services and spending.
Panelists:
Don Drummond, Matthews Fellow in Global Public Policy, Adjunct Professor, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University
Alex Himelfarb, Director of Glendon School of Public and International Affairs, York University, Broadbent Fellow
Janine Brodie, Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in Political Economy and Social Governance, University of Alberta, Broadbent Fellow
Eve-Lyne Couturier, Researcher, Institut de Recherche et d’informations socio-economique
Moderator: Paul Adams, former political reporter, CBC and The Globe and Mail; Professor of Journalism, Carleton University
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #8: Bridging online and offline campaigning             3:15 - 4:30
The rise of social media and digital technologies has transformed how campaigns today are imagined, organized and executed. This panel will explore how campaigns use digital organizing tools to effectively mobilize offline action, and speaks to the potential for those tools to be harnessed to create real-world change.
Panelists:
Julia Pope, Director of External Relations, Leadnow
Simon Lafrance, Managing Partner, Strategeum
Jason Mogus, Principal Consultant, Communicopia, Broadbent Fellow
Jennifer Hollett, Digital strategist, Award-winning broadcast journalist, Broadbent Fellow
Moderator: Susan Delacourt, Senior Political Writer, Toronto Star
Location: Panorama Room
Coffee break      4:30 – 4:45
Keynote #3: Leadership and Purpose: Progressive Politics for Today and Tomorrow      4:45 – 6:00
Keynote: Julia Gillard, past Prime Minister of Australia
Focus:  Ms. Gillard will discuss the core challenge facing progressive governments: the premium on creating jobs, balancing sustainability and resource development, and the key environmental, business and labour issues that underpin that challenge.  She will speak specifically to the global climate challenge issue and to her government’s introduction of a carbon tax. Ms. Gillard will also discuss lessons for leadership in these times, including those drawn from her prime ministership and to the salient subject of barriers confronting women in political leadership.  Finally, Ms Gillard will discuss the overall ties and relations between Australia and Canada.
Q&A: Paul Wells, Political Editor, Maclean’s Magazine
Location: Main Ballroom
MediaStyle hospitality suite |     18:00
Broadbent Institute and Equal Voice celebrate Australia’s first female Prime Minister Julia Gillard     18:15
21:00 – 1:00: Shimmy to the Left – Saturday night social
-Featuring artists Sarah Harmer, Sally Folk and Blurred Vision
Sunday March 30th
Opening Remarks | Presentation of Contest Award             9:00 – 9:30
Location: Main Ballroom
Presentation of Income splitting: the Mad Men Giveaway contest award
Broadbent Senior Policy Advisor, Andrew Jackson
Contest winner: Sarah Ryan
Panel #9: Getting our act together:  lessons from winning progressive campaigns in the US and Canada              9:30 – 10:45
Progress doesn’t happen on its own, and neither good ideas nor policy implement themselves. Convincing the public and influencing decision-makers to move forward with solutions to pressing issues requires effective advocacy and compelling campaigns. Drawing on lessons from previous progressive victories, panelists in this session will share their perspectives from Canada and the US on the most important resources, skills, and assets that the progressive movement needs in order to win on important progressive issues.
Panelists:
Erik Peterson, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Wellstone
Ashley Pinedo, National Training Director, Organizing for Action
Tzeporah Berman, author and environmental campaigner, Broadbent Fellow
Ray Guardia, Deputy Chief of Staff, Projet Montréal
Moderator: Kathleen Monk, Senior Advisor, Broadbent Institute
Location: Main Ballroom
Panel #10 Good jobs and fair wages: can “pre-distribution” solve growing income inequality?              9:30 – 10:45
Much of the debate over addressing income inequality focuses on the tax and transfer system and the need to redistribute market income.  While vitally important, this panel will discuss an often-neglected side of the equation: fixing inequality in the initial distribution of wages, salaries and investment income. It will discuss the need for labour market reforms, the role of unions, and the need for better corporate governance.
Panelists:
Lars Osberg, Professor of Economics, Dalhousie University, Broadbent Fellow
Marc Lavoie, Professor of Economics at University of Ottawa, Broadbent Fellow
Armine Yalnizyan, Senior Economist at Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
Peter Macleod, Principle, Mass LBP and founding director, Wagemark foundation
Moderator: Tom Walkom, Toronto Star National Affairs columnist
Location: Pinnacle Room
Panel#9 Making things: the Future of Manufacturing in Canada     9:30 – 10:45
Most agree that Canada must invest heavily in innovation and skills in order to support the high wage jobs manufacturing typically provides. But there is fierce debate over what mix of government support and corporate investment is needed to generate those new winning sectors.  This session explores what role manufacturing should play in a 21st century Canadian economy, and asks why Canadians should care.  Debating controversial factors in manufacturing’s decline, it asks what policy levers must be pulled to transform manufacturing moving forward.  
Panelists:
Matt Mendelsohn, Director, Mowat Centre
Jordan Brennan, Economist UNIFOR
Ross Hornby, Vice President, Government Affairs and Policy, General Electric Canada
Sandra Schwartz, Vice President, External Relations and Communications, Canadian Electricity Association
Moderator: Heather Scoffield, Ottawa Bureau Chief, Canadian Press
Location: Panorama
Coffee break |     10:45 – 11:15
Keynote #4:  Winning hearts, minds, and clicks|             11:15 – 12:30
Speaker: Anastasia Khoo, Marketing Director, Human Rights Campaign
Focus: Anastasia Khoo knows a thing or two about effective digital engagement and campaigning. Khoo spearheaded the Human Rights Campaign’s viral red marriage equality initiative last year that saw Facebook turn red with the HRC’s equal sign logo breaking Twitter’s record for highest engagement on a tweet. Speaking to that campaign, Khoo will discuss what was really behind the incredible digital engagement numbers that helped tip the scales of public opinion and usher in a major progressive victory on marriage equality: personal stories and relationships. Khoo will outline the arc of this progressive victory and draw lessons for future campaigns. She will also speak to the significance of Canada’s LGBTQ track record and what Canada’s leadership on these issues continues to mean in the ongoing battle for equality worldwide.   
Panel response:
Elizabeth Plank, Executive Social Editor, PolicyMic
Jamie Biggar, Executive Director of Leadnow
Ian Capstick, President of MediaStyle
Moderator: Mira Oreck, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Broadbent Institute
Location: Main Ballroom
Concluding Remarks:     12:30
Rick Smith, Executive Director, Broadbent Institute
Main Ballroom

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Friday, January 9, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
2014 in photos Dec. 19, 2014

Mark Burgess
Justice Minister Peter MacKay, NDP MP Mathieu Ravignat, and Patrick Brown at the Canadian Tire Canal Classic, a charity shinny game between parliamentarians and the press on the Rideau Canal in January. The MPs prevailed.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Labour Minister Kellie Leitch, Chris Frogatt of National Public Relations and Blue Sky’s Sandra Buckler at the Manning Centre party in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
NDP MP Peter Stoffer in his Parliament Hill office in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Democratic Reform Minister Pierre Poilievre prepares to testify before the Procedure and House Affairs Committee in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau speaks at the party’s policy convention in Montreal in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Liberal MP Rodger Cuzner and Conservative MP James Rajotte at the Fuelling the dream Canadian Olympic team luncheon on the Hill in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Speaker of the House of Commons Andrew Scheer showing off his stickhandling skills at the February Fuelling the dream Canadian Olympic team luncheon on the Hill.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Liberal MP Wayne Easter and Conservative MP John Duncan at the Fuelling the dream Canadian Olympic team luncheon on the Hill in February.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Minister of Sport Bal Gosal at a Nature Canada event on the Hill on Feb. 3 alongside an owl.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
The late Jim Flaherty pictured on Feb. 11 2014, the day he delivered his last federal budget.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
The post-budget day party at Hy’s Steakhouse.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Prime Minister Stephen Harper heading out to greet Shi Ismaili Muslim spiritual leader Aga Khan on Feb. 27.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Laureen Harper, the Governor General’s wife Sharon Johnston, and Prime Minister Stephen Harper pictured Canadian as soldiers came home from Afghanistan on March 18, 2014. Also pictured, Defence Minister Rob Nicholson, and Chief of Defence Staff General Tom Lawson.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
NDP MP Andrew Cash and Canadian songstress Serena Ryder at the 2014 Canadian Screen Awards in March, in Toronto.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
NDP MPs Pierre Nantel, Rathika Sitsabaiesan, Peggy Nash and Laurin Liu on the red carpet at the Canadian Screen Awards in March.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Heritage Minister Shelly Glover and Gabrielle star Alexandre Landry at the Canadian Screen Awards in March.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Actor Viggo Mortensen shows his true colours with Heritage Minister Shelly Glover at the Canadian Screen Awards in March.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Conservative MP Michael Chong, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and Green Party Leader Elizabeth attend the launch of the iVote-jeVote campaign at the University of Ottawa in March to encourage young voters to engage in the political process.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Conservative MP Michael Chong and NDP Leader Tom Mulcair talk democratic engagement at the University of Ottawa in March.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Transport Minister Lisa Raitt and NDP MP Megan Leslie, pictured on April 2, 2014, at the Politics & the Pen gala, which raised $350,000 for the Writers Trust. The two hosted the evening, cracked a lot of jokes and sang Gloria Gaynor's song, I Will Survive.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Prime Minister Stephen Harper delivering remarks to his caucus upon hearing of Jim Flaherty’s passing on April 10, while an emotion Laureen Harper looks on.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Conservative MP Susan Truppe comforts Labour Minister Kellie Leitch upon hearing of Jim Flaherty’s passing on April 10.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Conservative MP John Weston comes up for air while swimming laps at the Chateau Laurier’s pool in May. Mr. Weston is one of “The Chief Fun and Fitness Officers,” a group of MPs that take part in physical activities together.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
A pro-choice protestor holds a sign reading “my body, my choice” during the annual National March for Life demonstration on the Hill, on May 8.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Conservative MPs John Williamson and Rob Moore.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
NDP MP Megan Leslie.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Another lawn summer night at the Elmdale Lawn Bowling Club.
The Hill Times photo by Steve Gerecke
First Nations protesters on Parliament Hill as part of the Peoples’ Social Forum gathering in Ottawa in August.
The Hill Times photo by Steve Gerecke
Peoples’ social forum in August.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
The Government Relations Institute of Canada’s board members took on the Ice Bucket Challenge outside of the Chambers building on Aug. 29.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
CBC TV's This Hour Has 22 Minutes comedian Mark Critch interviewing NDP MP Pierre Nantel, his party's culture critic at the September edition of Movie Night on the Hill, the Canadian premier of Elephant Song.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Postmedia’s Stephen Maher dressed in his cowboy best, with Camille Labchuk, for the Jaimie Anderson Fundraiser at the Black Sheep Inn, in Wakefield on Sept. 26.
The Hill Times photo by Mark Burgess
At 9:52 a.m. Oct. 22, the first calls come in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. People try to save Cpl. Nathan Cirilo’s life.
The Hill Times photo by Mark Burgess
Mid-afternoon on Oct. 22, police head down Metcalfe Street to secure buildings that had been on lockdown for fear of a gunman on the loose. Reports later confirmed the lone gunman had been killed inside Centre Block.
The Hill Times photo by Steve Gerecke
Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe, NDP MP, had come to the Hill on Oct. 22 with her baby and was breastfeeding in the lobby when the gunman entered. She hid in a phone booth until Hill security brought them to a safer place
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers carries the mace during the first Speakers Parade into the House of Commons following the shooting, on Oct. 23.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Flowers at the National War Memorial to honour Cpl. Nathan Cirillo.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
A soldier stands guard at the National War Memorial on Nov. 11.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
The Remembrance Day ceremony at the National War Memorial.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Canadian rock icon Burton Cummings backstage with Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Gregoire at the Hope Live gala at the Great Canadian Theatre Company on Oct. 27.
The Hill Times photo by Jake Wright
Competing culinary team from the Lowertown Brewery at the 10th annual Gold Medal Plates on Nov. 17 at the Shaw Centre.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE