Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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THE FULL NELSON
To vouch or not to vouch: that is the question

To mollify both the critics and supporters of vouching there is a solution: maintain the practice but place the vouched ballots in a sealed envelope at each polling station.


  
NDP fortunes shrinking

Charisma only goes so far. Trudeau senior had it and triumphed very soon after becoming the Liberal leader in 1968. The Tories are unpopular and the Trudeau effect could wear off as it did for his father, whose popularity really only revived after his death. Meanwhile, Mulcair is biding his time.


  
Nelson Wiseman: the low voter turnout a problem?

  
The road to Senate reform is a cul-de-sac

The Supreme Court, like the Quebec Court of Appeal, will almost certainly tell the government that its Senate reform proposals do not pass constitutional muster and, since an accord with the provinces is a non-starter, the Senate status quo will prevail. Get used to it.


  
Politics shouldn’t always be a team sport

In Canada, MPs, and MLAs are compelled to be team players under their coach’s thumb.


  
Designating Canada’s monarch

Parliament’s new act opens a potential assortment of problems. A better tack might have been for the Prime Minister to tell the British that their BNA Act of 1867 offers a sufficient basis for Canada’s compliance with whatever new act the British adopt with respect to the office of the Queen.


  
Comparing Harper and Diefenbaker

Both John Diefenbaker and Stephen Harper were born in Ontario. Both moved to the Prairies and became prime ministers.


  
The PM and the challenge of Senate reform

  
The mystique and the promise of Trudeau

The danger to the Liberals is that if they fail to break through in the next election and at least form the official opposition, the consequences may be fatal. It could be game over.


  
Ontario: Region-state? Dependant-State? Kingmaker

Ontario will gain 15 seats in the next federal election; together, Alberta and British Columbia will gain 12. The key to 24 Sussex Drive in 2011 was in Ontario. It will continue to be so for a while.


  
How prorogation may be leading to coalition governments

The new practice of political prorogation, therefore, may lead to increased receptivity to coalition governments. Much of the democratic world has them, but Canada has been a laggard on this score. Catch-up may be coming.


  
To my Godfather Preston

What has happened to our promised free votes in Parliament, the loosening of party discipline, the plans for citizen-initiated referenda, and the ability to recall MPs?


  
Undoing the Prime Minister

The greatest danger to the PM is therefore from within, not without. Paradoxically, it is from those MPs who have the least enviable jobs in Parliament: muzzled government backbenchers, those who must shut up and cannot publicly rail or criticize as opposition MPs are free to do.


  
Democratizing Senate not in Harper’s interest

The federal government’s Senate reform bill will likely be buried because the Conservatives are behaving like their Liberal predecessors—touting reform but doing very little.


  
Canada’s bilingual regime

The two solitudes have grown further apart as more French Canadians outside of Quebec have intermarried, assimilated, and lost their facility in French.


  
Atlantic Canada could be a leading political indicator

As the welfare state has embedded itself ever more firmly in Atlantic Canadians’ lives, the NDP has implanted itself in Atlantic Canada’s traditional conservative political culture. The NDP can no longer be easily dismissed as outsiders ‘from away’ who preach alien doctrines and pursue utopian sorties.


  
Left, right, and centre in Canadian politics

Few politicians call themselves leftist or rightist, although NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has come close by denying he is a centrist: ‘We want to move the centre to us, not move to centre.’


  
Connecting the dots among Canada’s Conservative parties

  
The shifting winds of Canada’s multicultural story

Today, Harper’s Conservatives seek to boost immigration levels to unprecedented levels and Jason Kenney, as minister of Immigration, has become a grandmaster at wooing ethnic fraternal organizations and the ethnic media.


  
Canadian policy, Canadian attitudes, and the Middle East

For decades, Canada’s politicians, diplomats, and the media have considered the Israel-Palestine conflict as the core issue in the Middle East; solving that conflict, it has been assumed, would bring regional peace, security, and stability. The so-called Arab Spring has exploded this assumption.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Former Liberal deputy prime minister Herb Gray dies at age 82: some photos from his life on the Hill April 22, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray, the former Liberal MP, Cabinet minister, and deputy prime minister, pictured here with his daughter Elizabeth Gray-Smith, died on Monday, April 21 at the age of 82. He served in Parliament of 39 years and was one of Canada's longest-serving MPs.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray and his former assistant Eugene Lang, pictured at a Hill reception.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray, pictured on his way to a U.S. Embassy's Fourth of July party in Ottawa. Mr. Gray may have not been in the House in his later years, but he regularly attended Hill-related receptions.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray at a menorah-lighting ceremony on the Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured back in his Centre Block office when he was in government.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured in his Centre Block office, being interviewed by Bill Curry, who was a reporter for The Hill Times.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured in his Centre Block office back when he was in government.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on the Hill posing for The Hill Times.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on the Hill back when he was a Cabinet minister.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on Parliament Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray pictured with his wife, Sharon Sholzberg, on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured in a Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Jim Peterson and Herb Gray, pictured on a rainy day on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Jim Peterson and Herb Gray.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, centre, pictured with the late Liberal MP Shaughnessy Cohen, and Windsor Star Hill reporter Paul McKeague, during a Hill fire drill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, who went esophagus cancer in 1996 and beat it, is pictured here in a Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured at a Parliamentary Press Gallery Dinner on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured at the Lester B. Pearson Building in Ottawa on his way into a special Cabinet minister back when he was a Cabinet minister.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured in a Hill scrum. Allan Thompson, left, was a reporter with The Toronto Star, and Paul McKeague, pictured right behind Mr. Gray, was never far behind the MP from Windsor.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray in another Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray in his Centre Block office back when he was a Cabinet minister. He collected, framed, and hung up most of the editorial cartoons of himself in his Centre Block office.
The Hill Times file photo
Herb Gray and his many framed cartoons.
The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
Herb Gray and his editorial cartoons, pictured in his Centre Block office.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE