Wednesday, May 6, 2015
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POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
Liberals need to burst out of Ottawa Bubble

Wouldn’t it have been better for the Liberals to expend their scarce party resources on a TV ad that took on an issue that actually mattered to voters?


  
Stephen Harper: Canada’s Relative Conservative

If you’re a conservative and you want conservative fiscal policies, Stephen Harper’s still your best choice—if only by default. The same holds true if you care about economic competence.


  
If Harper plays his cards right, he won’t be sunk by Duffy trial

Yup, voters can be a forgiving lot. You can call my analysis wrong, you can even call it cynical. Just don’t call it wishful thinking.


  
Duffy saga raises intriguing questions

But this particular court case is getting so much media attention, you’d think it was the Watergate hearings, the O.J. Simpson murder trial, and the Super Bowl all wrapped up into one.


  
Ignore political Chicken Littles, for the sake of democracy

MPs like Scott Simms and Charlie Angus and Brent Rathgeber seemingly want to further limit free speech by gagging groups, such as Conservative Voice, between elections. We can’t let that happen.


  
Flanagan’s strategic plan won’t work

Sorry Tom, but if the Conservatives are going to win, they’re going to have to do it on their own.


  
When it comes to political ads, expect the unexpected

Good political communications strategies are like chameleons; they adapt to their environment.


  
Trudeau’s startling words

Justin Trudeau sounded an awful lot like an old-fashioned politician when he made those comments about why he supports Bill C-51. He sure didn’t sound like a courageous idealist out to change the world.


  
Everybody plays the fear card

It’s possible you’ve been subtly influenced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent over-the-top, anti-terrorism rhetoric. And yes, such overheated rhetoric is everywhere.


  
Canadian conservatism’s losing streak

In the past year, conservatives have lost a media voice, they’ve lost an election, they’ve lost principled leadership and they’ve come close to losing a party. That’s all bad.


  
Who will win the next federal election: Tough Guy, Fun Guy or Compassion Guy?

Any idea or concept you’re promoting as a politician, no matter how complicated it may be in theory, must in practice be boiled down to its most basic, most simplistic essence.


  
Imaginary attack ad scares Liberals

Even by endorsing Bill C-51, Trudeau will never outdo Harper over the ‘Who is tougher on terrorism?’ question. But he could alienate progressive voters.


  
Baird a positive impact on Canada’s conservative movement

That’s why I fervently hope John Baird continues to stay involved in the ongoing effort to define Canadian conservatism. His voice can still have an impact.


  
Explaining Canadian political politeness

If you’re an aspiring political consultant who wants to learn how to brawl, then get a job working on an American political campaign. Believe me, you’ll learn a lot.


  
Beware of the false consensus effect

  
Canada’s lack of true satire isn’t funny

True satire is about using humour to expose the absurdities of life; at the same time, it forces us to question our beliefs and our values.


  
Three things that would surprise me in 2015

It will surprise me if the Duffy trial’s a game-changer, Conservatives don’t reach out to veterans, and Trudeau stays positive.


  
A Canadian political Christmas tale

The moral of the story is it’s tough to write about the nasty world of politics at a time when we should be celebrating peace, love and joy.


  
The uncoolness of Canadian conservatism

Among politicians at least, conservatism in Canada today is about as fashionable as Lawrence Welk music at a high school prom.


  
NDP losing the narrative wars

The good news for New Democrats is that media perceptions can change quickly.


  
Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, May 6, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Press Freedom Advocates Look Back on a Bloody Year May 4, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
The Château Laurier was filled with journalists and press freedom advocates Thursday, April 30.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Don Newman moderated the luncheon again this year.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
The Globe and Mail's Shawn McCarthy, Canada Council of the Arts' Simon Brault, and AP's Kathy Gannon, accepting the 17th annual Canadian World Press Freedom Award.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
AP reporter Kathy Gannon giving a speech about what press freedom means to her, during the luncheon.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
University of Ottawa's Anne McIlroy, Free the Children's Shelley Page, and Maclean's Sue Allan.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
University of Ottawa professor Tolga Yalkin, and Global News' Jacques Bourbeau.
Courtesy of the Canadian Committee for World Press Freedom
First place cartoon in the international cartoon competition, Signe Wilkinson.
Courtesy of the Canadian Committee for World Press Freedom
Second place cartoon in the international cartoon competition, Elchicotriste.
Courtesy of the Canadian Committee for World Press Freedom
Third place cartoon in the international cartoon competition, Ebrahim Ghanei.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
House Speaker's D.Comms Heather Bradley, Andrew House, and Chris Day.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Earnscliffe's Geoff Norquay and Hugh Scott from RX&D.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Kristie Jones and Katie Tenenhouse of Reporters Without Borders.
The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade
Mohamed Fahmy joined the celebrations via video message.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE