Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014
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POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
Why The New York Times should like Harper

That’s the point The New York Times is missing. If, like Harper, the Republicans ever deem it to be in their political self-interest to limit the ability of ‘big money’ to influence elections, they’ll do it.


  
Get ready for the politics of resentment

What this means is the next federal election promises to pit right-wing populism against left-wing populism against regional-populism.


  
Democracy is messy but wonderful

A day after the tragic and horrendous Ottawa shooting, our federal political parties put aside their partisan cudgels and gathered in the House of Commons to express their unanimous support for the values that bring us together as a nation.


  
Upcoming tax debate good for Tories

In the next Canadian election, taxes will be discussed to death. In fact, the political script for this inevitable tax debate is easy to predict.


  
Team Trudeau pretty darn close to a personality cult

Team Trudeau has decided to take a different route; rather than emphasizing its brand, it’s stressing the personality of its leader: Justin Trudeau.


  
Get ready for some fiscal propaganda: Nicholls

However, the Conservatives want Canadians to feel good about the economy, but not too good.


  
Harper and the politics of green

The reason Stephen Harper gives the environmental movement the cold shoulder has less to do with him hating Mother Earth and more do with him wanting to win elections.


  
Let’s keep voting voluntary: Gerry Nicholls

Mandatory voting, which the Liberal Party of Canada is apparently thinking about making part of its election agenda, is the wrong remedy to the wrong problem.


  
Last two weeks of an election campaign matter

It’s during those two weeks, when voters are finally focused, when they are finally paying attention and when they are finally open to influence, you need to make the strongest case possible for your candidate or party.


  
Mulcair’s policy gambit risky, but right

While Justin Trudeau is strong when it comes to personality, he’s weak when it comes to policy. And this weakness explains why Tom Mulcair is releasing his policy planks now.


  
Harper faces frustratingly fuzzy future

What’s frustrating Stephen Harper isn’t the Conservative Party’s consistently poor showing in public polls, or the scandals which have plagued his government or his increasingly toxic relationship with the media. What would irk him is the fuzzy nature of Canada’s political future.


  
Has Trudeau become boring?

  
Social media provides forum for partisan loopiness, but don’t ban it

  
Trudeau: Photo op superstar

Photo ops matter because we are a visual species; strong images move us.


  
Union leader should temper his rhetoric

During the next federal election Sid Ryan and his union allies won’t be able to play the same political role as they did in Ontario; certainly they won’t be able to spend the same sort of money on media ads to defeat Harper as they did to defeat Hudak.


  
How to embrace a problem: Conservatives can use bad polls to fundraise

If a problem can’t be avoided, sometimes it should be embraced. To see what I mean just consider the Conservative Party of Canada and its ‘poll problem,’ which can be defined thusly: ‘Almost every public domain poll that’s come out over the past year or so, has the Conservatives trailing the Justin Trudeau-led Liberals.’


  
Harper’s stance on Israel is good politics: Gerry Nicholls

Prime Minister Stephen Harper still owns the ‘Israel is our best friend’ position and that could ultimately pay political dividends.


  
Activist Centrism: Canada’s new ideology

Too bad it has one major drawback. It makes for good politics, but it doesn’t necessarily make for good economic policy.


  
A fundraising experiment the NDP should avoid: Gerry Nicholls

  
Harper’s not your typical federal leader: Nicholls

Despite his current bad poll numbers, Prime Minister Stephen Harper is still the party’s most able campaigner, he’s still its most brilliant political tactician and, most importantly, he’s still one of the few politicians who can unite the normally fractious conservative movement.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Thursday, November 20, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE