Sunday, March 29, 2015
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POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
When it comes to political ads, expect the unexpected

Good political communications strategies are like chameleons; they adapt to their environment.


  
Trudeau’s startling words

Justin Trudeau sounded an awful lot like an old-fashioned politician when he made those comments about why he supports Bill C-51. He sure didn’t sound like a courageous idealist out to change the world.


  
Everybody plays the fear card

It’s possible you’ve been subtly influenced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent over-the-top, anti-terrorism rhetoric. And yes, such overheated rhetoric is everywhere.


  
Canadian conservatism’s losing streak

In the past year, conservatives have lost a media voice, they’ve lost an election, they’ve lost principled leadership and they’ve come close to losing a party. That’s all bad.


  
Who will win the next federal election: Tough Guy, Fun Guy or Compassion Guy?

Any idea or concept you’re promoting as a politician, no matter how complicated it may be in theory, must in practice be boiled down to its most basic, most simplistic essence.


  
Imaginary attack ad scares Liberals

Even by endorsing Bill C-51, Trudeau will never outdo Harper over the ‘Who is tougher on terrorism?’ question. But he could alienate progressive voters.


  
Baird a positive impact on Canada’s conservative movement

That’s why I fervently hope John Baird continues to stay involved in the ongoing effort to define Canadian conservatism. His voice can still have an impact.


  
Explaining Canadian political politeness

If you’re an aspiring political consultant who wants to learn how to brawl, then get a job working on an American political campaign. Believe me, you’ll learn a lot.


  
Beware of the false consensus effect

  
Canada’s lack of true satire isn’t funny

True satire is about using humour to expose the absurdities of life; at the same time, it forces us to question our beliefs and our values.


  
Three things that would surprise me in 2015

It will surprise me if the Duffy trial’s a game-changer, Conservatives don’t reach out to veterans, and Trudeau stays positive.


  
A Canadian political Christmas tale

The moral of the story is it’s tough to write about the nasty world of politics at a time when we should be celebrating peace, love and joy.


  
The uncoolness of Canadian conservatism

Among politicians at least, conservatism in Canada today is about as fashionable as Lawrence Welk music at a high school prom.


  
NDP losing the narrative wars

The good news for New Democrats is that media perceptions can change quickly.


  
Harper’s career longevity won’t impress his critics

Stephen Harper has now logged in more than 3,200 days as leader of this country, making him the sixth longest-serving prime minister in Canadian history.


  
Why The New York Times should like Harper

That’s the point The New York Times is missing. If, like Harper, the Republicans ever deem it to be in their political self-interest to limit the ability of ‘big money’ to influence elections, they’ll do it.


  
Get ready for the politics of resentment

What this means is the next federal election promises to pit right-wing populism against left-wing populism against regional-populism.


  
Democracy is messy but wonderful

A day after the tragic and horrendous Ottawa shooting, our federal political parties put aside their partisan cudgels and gathered in the House of Commons to express their unanimous support for the values that bring us together as a nation.


  
Upcoming tax debate good for Tories

In the next Canadian election, taxes will be discussed to death. In fact, the political script for this inevitable tax debate is easy to predict.


  
Team Trudeau pretty darn close to a personality cult

Team Trudeau has decided to take a different route; rather than emphasizing its brand, it’s stressing the personality of its leader: Justin Trudeau.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Sunday, March 29, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Broadbent Institute Progress Summit 2015 - Day 3 panels March 28, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Charles Taylor spoke about diversity, secularism and the path to an inclusive, progressive Quebec and Canada.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Charles Taylor did a Q&A with author Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Political philosopher Charles Taylor.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Toronto Star columnist Susan Delacourt moderated a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Kill the Messengers author Mark Bourrie spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Party of One author Mike Harris spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

University of Montreal's Frederic Merand spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Fair Vote Canada executive director Kelly Carmichael spoke on a panel called The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Great Unravelling: Why It Matters How Canada has Become Less Democratic panel: Kelly Carmichael, Frederic Merand, Michael Harris, Mark Bourrie and moderator Susan Delacourt.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Facebook's Kevin Chan, spoke about how Facebook can help power campaigns and engage Canadians.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Don Guy introduced the Great Debate panelists.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Armine Yalnizyan and Tom Clark, moderator of the Great Debate on Spending versus Austerity: Time to invest or cut?

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Great Debate on Spending versus Austerity: Time to invest or cut? panel: Monte Solberg, Philip Cross, Linda McQuaig, Armine Yalnizyan and Tom Clark.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Former Conservative Cabinet minister Monte Solberg, left, and former StatsCan chief analyst Philip Cross.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives economist Armine Yalnizyan.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

NDP Toronto Centre candidate and author Linda McQuaig.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

The Fikcle Mellennials? Progressive values and political engagement panel -- Millennial Project policy adviser David Kitching, Juno award-winning rapper and host of CBC's Q Shad, Toronto District School Board trustee Ausma Malik, University of Saskatchewan professor David McGrane and Macleans' Aaron Wherry.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Toronto District School Board trustee Ausma Malik.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

University of Saskatchewan political scientist David McGrane and Macleans' Aaron Wherry.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Juno award-winning rapper Shad, host of CBC's Q.

The Hill Times photograph by Bea Vongdouangchanh

Carbon progress: Paris and Beyond panelists Johanne Whitmore, Gerard Fuchs, moderator Mike De Souza, Coralie Deny, and Sidney Ribaux

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE