Sunday, April 26, 2015
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POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
If Harper plays his cards right, he won’t be sunk by Duffy trial

Yup, voters can be a forgiving lot. You can call my analysis wrong, you can even call it cynical. Just don’t call it wishful thinking.


  
Duffy saga raises intriguing questions

But this particular court case is getting so much media attention, you’d think it was the Watergate hearings, the O.J. Simpson murder trial, and the Super Bowl all wrapped up into one.


  
Ignore political Chicken Littles, for the sake of democracy

MPs like Scott Simms and Charlie Angus and Brent Rathgeber seemingly want to further limit free speech by gagging groups, such as Conservative Voice, between elections. We can’t let that happen.


  
Flanagan’s strategic plan won’t work

Sorry Tom, but if the Conservatives are going to win, they’re going to have to do it on their own.


  
When it comes to political ads, expect the unexpected

Good political communications strategies are like chameleons; they adapt to their environment.


  
Trudeau’s startling words

Justin Trudeau sounded an awful lot like an old-fashioned politician when he made those comments about why he supports Bill C-51. He sure didn’t sound like a courageous idealist out to change the world.


  
Everybody plays the fear card

It’s possible you’ve been subtly influenced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent over-the-top, anti-terrorism rhetoric. And yes, such overheated rhetoric is everywhere.


  
Canadian conservatism’s losing streak

In the past year, conservatives have lost a media voice, they’ve lost an election, they’ve lost principled leadership and they’ve come close to losing a party. That’s all bad.


  
Who will win the next federal election: Tough Guy, Fun Guy or Compassion Guy?

Any idea or concept you’re promoting as a politician, no matter how complicated it may be in theory, must in practice be boiled down to its most basic, most simplistic essence.


  
Imaginary attack ad scares Liberals

Even by endorsing Bill C-51, Trudeau will never outdo Harper over the ‘Who is tougher on terrorism?’ question. But he could alienate progressive voters.


  
Baird a positive impact on Canada’s conservative movement

That’s why I fervently hope John Baird continues to stay involved in the ongoing effort to define Canadian conservatism. His voice can still have an impact.


  
Explaining Canadian political politeness

If you’re an aspiring political consultant who wants to learn how to brawl, then get a job working on an American political campaign. Believe me, you’ll learn a lot.


  
Beware of the false consensus effect

  
Canada’s lack of true satire isn’t funny

True satire is about using humour to expose the absurdities of life; at the same time, it forces us to question our beliefs and our values.


  
Three things that would surprise me in 2015

It will surprise me if the Duffy trial’s a game-changer, Conservatives don’t reach out to veterans, and Trudeau stays positive.


  
A Canadian political Christmas tale

The moral of the story is it’s tough to write about the nasty world of politics at a time when we should be celebrating peace, love and joy.


  
The uncoolness of Canadian conservatism

Among politicians at least, conservatism in Canada today is about as fashionable as Lawrence Welk music at a high school prom.


  
NDP losing the narrative wars

The good news for New Democrats is that media perceptions can change quickly.


  
Harper’s career longevity won’t impress his critics

Stephen Harper has now logged in more than 3,200 days as leader of this country, making him the sixth longest-serving prime minister in Canadian history.


  
Why The New York Times should like Harper

That’s the point The New York Times is missing. If, like Harper, the Republicans ever deem it to be in their political self-interest to limit the ability of ‘big money’ to influence elections, they’ll do it.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Sunday, April 26, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Vickers honoured at Douglas C. Frith dinner April 2, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The Château Laurier Ballroom was packed on Tuesday, March 31 for the Canadian Association of Former Parliamentarians dinner.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
The evening began with RCMP Cpl. Craig Kennedy's rendition of O Canada.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Ambassador to Ireland Kevin Vickers was recognized as an honorary member of CAFP for his heroism as the Sergeant at Arms during the Oct. 22 shooting.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Peter O'Brian, Liberal MP Carolyn Bennett and Steve Paikin.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Rob Nicholson and former Liberal MP Sue Barnes.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Conservative MP Dean Allison.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Kevin Vickers and Conservative MP Ray Boughen.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
International Union of Operating Engineers' Steven Schumann and Canadian Labour's Nathan Rotman.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
House Deputy Speaker Joe Comartin.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Mary Dawson, Senator David Smith, and Sharon Sholzberg-Gray.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Senator Art Eggleton and Conservative MP Earl Dreeshen.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Independent MP Brent Rathgeber in conversation with TVO's Steve Paikin.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Andrew Cardozo, Pearson Centre president.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Conservative MP Jay Aspin and Kevin Vickers.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Lobbyist Leo Duguay.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
TVO host and author Steve Paikin gave an impassioned speech on what he's learned about the allure of public life.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE