Saturday, May 30, 2015
SUBSCRIBE | LOG IN
Sign up for the free daily email

POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
Too much shredding Trudeau could hurt Conservatives

Think about it. A Liberal collapse would actually swell the NDP ranks, supercharging the party and turning it into a political force capable of winning the next federal election.


  
Can one-trick Trudeau learn another trick?

Detailed policy proposals are like arsenic; they might be harmless if administered in small, diluted amounts, but a concentrated dosage can be fatal.


  
Can one-trick Trudeau learn another trick?

Detailed policy proposals are like arsenic; they might be harmless if administered in small, diluted amounts, but a concentrated dosage can be fatal.


  
Five lessons the Alberta election taught us

Don’t alienate your base, timing is everything, put down that newspaper, tribalism is key, and ideology schmideology.


  
Liberals need to burst out of Ottawa Bubble

Wouldn’t it have been better for the Liberals to expend their scarce party resources on a TV ad that took on an issue that actually mattered to voters?


  
Stephen Harper: Canada’s Relative Conservative

If you’re a conservative and you want conservative fiscal policies, Stephen Harper’s still your best choice—if only by default. The same holds true if you care about economic competence.


  
If Harper plays his cards right, he won’t be sunk by Duffy trial

Yup, voters can be a forgiving lot. You can call my analysis wrong, you can even call it cynical. Just don’t call it wishful thinking.


  
Duffy saga raises intriguing questions

But this particular court case is getting so much media attention, you’d think it was the Watergate hearings, the O.J. Simpson murder trial, and the Super Bowl all wrapped up into one.


  
Ignore political Chicken Littles, for the sake of democracy

MPs like Scott Simms and Charlie Angus and Brent Rathgeber seemingly want to further limit free speech by gagging groups, such as Conservative Voice, between elections. We can’t let that happen.


  
Flanagan’s strategic plan won’t work

Sorry Tom, but if the Conservatives are going to win, they’re going to have to do it on their own.


  
When it comes to political ads, expect the unexpected

Good political communications strategies are like chameleons; they adapt to their environment.


  
Trudeau’s startling words

Justin Trudeau sounded an awful lot like an old-fashioned politician when he made those comments about why he supports Bill C-51. He sure didn’t sound like a courageous idealist out to change the world.


  
Everybody plays the fear card

It’s possible you’ve been subtly influenced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent over-the-top, anti-terrorism rhetoric. And yes, such overheated rhetoric is everywhere.


  
Canadian conservatism’s losing streak

In the past year, conservatives have lost a media voice, they’ve lost an election, they’ve lost principled leadership and they’ve come close to losing a party. That’s all bad.


  
Who will win the next federal election: Tough Guy, Fun Guy or Compassion Guy?

Any idea or concept you’re promoting as a politician, no matter how complicated it may be in theory, must in practice be boiled down to its most basic, most simplistic essence.


  
Imaginary attack ad scares Liberals

Even by endorsing Bill C-51, Trudeau will never outdo Harper over the ‘Who is tougher on terrorism?’ question. But he could alienate progressive voters.


  
Baird a positive impact on Canada’s conservative movement

That’s why I fervently hope John Baird continues to stay involved in the ongoing effort to define Canadian conservatism. His voice can still have an impact.


  
Explaining Canadian political politeness

If you’re an aspiring political consultant who wants to learn how to brawl, then get a job working on an American political campaign. Believe me, you’ll learn a lot.


  
Beware of the false consensus effect

  
Canada’s lack of true satire isn’t funny

True satire is about using humour to expose the absurdities of life; at the same time, it forces us to question our beliefs and our values.


  
Parliamentary Calendar
Saturday, May 30, 2015
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
As Justice Minister Peter MacKay prepares to announce he's is leaving politics, here's a look back at his time on the Hill May 29, 2015

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay joined by Senator Bob Runciman, Tim Uppal, and Corneliu Chisu met with the Amalgamated Transit Union and the Canadian Urban Transit Association to mark the passing of Bill S-221, which amends the Criminal Code to address assaults against public transit operators.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

On May 12, the day UN rapporteur James Anaya released his report on the situation of indigenous peoples in Canada, families of missing and murdered women demonstrated on the steps of Parliament Hill. Mr. MacKay and fellow Conservative MP Joy Smith happened to be on the steps at the same time, for a photo opportunity, where a life jacket-donning Mr. MacKay was confronted by the women asking for his help. He said he would be willing to sit down and talk about the issue of missing and murdered women. When the meeting in Mr. MacKay’s office was scheduled, it was arranged symbolically to be held on the six-year anniversary of Mr. Harper’s apology to First Nations for residential schools, said Mr. Fiddler.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay behind the bench at a 2013 Conservative Party hockey game.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay with his wife Nazanin Afshin-Jam and their son Kian.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay with Laureen Harper at the 2013 Sandbox Canada event on Sparks Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay, getting meta with his BlackBerry, alongside fellow caucus colleagues in 2013. From left: Bernard Valcourt, Shelly Glover, Peter Van Loan, Leona Aglukkaq, and Diane Finley.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

In committee with junior defence minister Julian Fantino, on March 13, 2012. During the meeting the pair said the government would commit to procuring the F-35 joint single strike fighter jets.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Then-U.S. Secretary of Defence Robert M. Gates and Peter MacKay during his tenure as Defence minister.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay and Tim Powers. Mr. MacKay broke his arm while being tackled in a rugby game on the Hill on May 27, 2009. He was playing for the Canadian Forces team, against the Ottawa Irish Rugby Club, which Mr. Powers is a part of. Apparently Mr. MacKay barely flinched when the medics pushed his elbow back in place, and was doing interviews five minutes later.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay with the Brazilian foreign minister Celso Luiz Nunes Amorim in a 2007 joint press conference following their bilateral meeting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay signing... as he was sworn in with the rest of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Cabinet Feb. 6, 2006.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

July 20, 2006 Mr. MacKay speaks to press after a technical briefing in Ottawa over concerns about the evacuation of Canadians from Lebanon.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Mr. MacKay tossing around a football on the Hill with Mr. Harper in 2005. Other photos from this afternoon on the lawn were cause for some contention for Mr. Harper at the time.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Peter MacKay, Jack Layton, and Anne McLellan in 2004, seen here debating the Throne Speech with CBC's Don Newman.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Then-leader of the Progressive Conservatives Peter MacKay, and Stephen Harper, then-leader of the Canadian Alliance announced on Oct. 16, 2003 that they agreed to join their two parties. 'Our swords will henceforth be pointed at the Liberals, not at each other,' Mr. Harper said at the time.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE