Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014
SUBSCRIBE | LOG IN
Sign up for the free daily email

POLLING & POLLSTERS
NDP still the party to beat in Quebec

Despite poor polling and byelection results in the rest of Canada, the New Democrats remain the party of choice for Quebec’s francophones.


  
Will a new party in Quebec change the game in 2015?

Forces et Démocratie may play little role in the next election, but it has the potential to be a spoiler.


  
New Brunswick shows little can change in a year

Last week’s provincial election in New Brunswick had some parallels with the current federal situation, but also carried some warnings.


  
Summer lull unlikely to improve Tory fortunes

The Senate scandal is still a political story, and one that is likely to explode again once Mike Duffy’s trial begins. The summer was never going to be the time for the Conservatives to regain the lead or improve their position by default. The fall is unlikely to be any kinder.


  
Ontario polls show how it should be done

The polls were not exactly the miss they have been made out to be. What’s more, some polls provided good examples of how to do it right.


  
Nothing new in confusing Ontario polls: Éric Grenier

The polls may be in disagreement, but Ontario has been indecisive in the run-up to an election before.


  
Approval ratings point to advantage for NDP and Mulcair

The Liberals and Conservatives may be leading in the polls, but Mulcair has better personal numbers.


  
Polls do their job in Quebec

After a string of bad calls, the polls in Quebec were on the money.


  
Who is the frontrunner to win in Ontario?

The polls cannot agree on which party is best placed to win the next election in Ontario.


  
Quebec provincial politics likely to make waves in Ottawa

With a Parti Québécois majority government a real possibility, federal parties in Ottawa won’t be able to sidestep Quebec provincial politics in 2014.


  
Will polls get back on track in 2014?

It was a very bad year for polling,after a rough one in 2012.The coming year provides a chance for political polling to get back on track,but only if the opportunity is seized.


  
The dangers of great expectations

The Liberals have the most to lose in today’s four federal byelections. But should they?


  
Lessons learned from Nova Scotia polling

The polls in Nova Scotia got it right. What can we learn from this success?


  
Has the Liberal brand rebounded?

After a near-death experience, the Liberal brand seems to have recovered.


  
Green Party could win second seat in Victoria in 2015

Though the 2015 election might be won or lost in Ontario and Quebec, B.C. could be the most interesting province to watch.


  
Polls are king in U.S., while in Canada they're derided: Grenier

'In the U.S., everyone seems to be celebrating the rise of the data wonk, yet in Canada, polling failures [are] pushing [the] opposite way. Polling aggregators have stunk in Canada [because] of bad polls from which to aggregate. Puts wind in [the] sails of chitchat pundits,' says Kevin Milligan.


  
Trudeau attacks betray Tory concern with the polls: Grenier

Apparently, not everyone believes that mid-mandate polls mean nothing.


  
Don’t give up on polls, demand better: Grenier

After the miss in B.C., the polls need to get better. Both for the sake of themselves and voters.


  
Public opinion polls point to opportunity for Trudeau federal Liberals

With greater attention comes greater risk for the Liberals, but also an opportunity not to be missed.


  
Polls remain mixed for Mulcair after one year

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Tuesday, November 25, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE