Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS II
PM can ill afford to ostracize progressives

A red Tory coup-in-the-making there may not be except in the self-serving imagination of Conservative MP Rob Anders, but cracks in the fragile foundation of Harper’s hard-earned majority there most certainly are and they are becoming harder to paper over.


  
Quebecers not interested in bickering match between NDP and Liberals

As they prepare for the larger 2015 Quebec battle both Justin Trudeau and Thomas Mulcair would be well advised to keep that in mind.


  
Not a good day at the office for Conservatives

To sum up: the RCMP alleges that people placed by Harper in the government’s and the Senate’s chain of command either broke the law or took part in a cover-up designed to make a scandal go away, but leaves the prime minister himself off the hook.


  
Upcoming byelections provide an early opportunity to see Trudeau lead a campaign

Whatever the results on Nov. 25, the Liberals should not be fooled into thinking that their leader is ready to part with his training wheels just yet.


  
Harper in a place no politician wants to be

The Prime Minister is out on a ledge, hewing to a version of events that appears less credible each day.


  
In took only minutes for Ottawa to return to its normal state

We have manufactured confrontation, a prime ministerial evacuation, Throne Speech obfuscation and trade deal exultation. It all started hours before the pomp and pageantry of the Throne Speech with another Conservative tradition, the contrived controversy.


  
Don’t be shocked by allegations of Canada spying

  
Public defiance, quiet compromise have served PM Harper well

It’s a style he will ride in the second half of his mandate.


  
House needs to debate assisted suicide

  
We’ll never know how Jack Layton would have dealt with Trudeau threat

What Brad Lavigne’s book does is remind us of the challenges thrown at Tom Mulcair since he assumed the job, challenges that Jack Layton would have faced had he had the chance to be opposition leader.


  
Mulcair delivers strongest indictment of Marois’ so-called values charter

It is a sure bet that one of the three federal parties will ultimately pay an electoral price in Quebec for this speedy repudiation of the charter. It is to the credit of all three of them that they looked beyond that inconvenience and chose human rights over political timidity.


  
On Syria, Harper retreats into role of the quiet Canadian

The world is split into many camps on the most serious international dilemma since Prime Minister Stephen Harper came to power.


  
Wallin blaming everyone except herself

  
Once a curiosity, foreign service union strike now verging on crisis

Much has been written about the plunging morale in a Canadian bureaucracy which feels diminished by its Conservative government masters and you can now add our representatives abroad to that list.


  
Canadian government must condemn Russia’s retrograde anti-gay laws at next month’s G20 summit

'We've been working hard behind the scenes, and obviously we're deeply disturbed, deeply concerned about President Putin signing this bill into law,' says Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird.


  
Approval could still come, but a rejection of Keystone could be part of Obama’s larger climate change legacy

A man who will not again face the electorate may be looking for a legacy issue and Canadian politicians may have unwittingly helped hand it to him.


  
Cabinet shuffle a spectacular feat of political marketing: Tim Harper

As for the tone and demeanour of this government, very little happened on July 15 to indicate a change there.


  
Random, unfocused violence near impossible to predict

The RCMP says it was a tip from the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service that twigged police to the alleged B.C. plot. If this turns out to be a real plot, good on CSIS.


  
Opposition leader must spend summer unravelling Mulcair mystery

If Justin Trudeau is Canada’s shiny object, then Tom Mulcair is Canada’s enigma wrapped in a beard.


  
Sorry spectacles in this Parliament, mud being tossed from one side of Commons and back again

  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Shootings at the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill, Oct. 22, 2014: in photographs Oct. 27, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

At 9:52 a.m., the first calls came in of shots fired at the National War Memorial. Five people tried to save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life who was standing guard at the National War Memorial. He later died of gunshot wounds.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

The people who tried save Cpl. Nathan Cirillo's life were later identified as Margaret Lerhe, a nurse on her way to work at the Elizabeth Bruyere Hospital; another corporal, a soldier, National Defence employee and former Naval officer Martin Magnan; and lawyer Barbara Winters who told Cpl. Cirillo that his family loved him while he lay dying.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

People running from Parliament Hill shortly after the gunfight in Centre Block where gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was shot dead by House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, House security officers, and the RCMP.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

The Parliament Buildings from Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Police pictured at the corner of Metcalfe and Slater streets in Ottawa later in the day on Oct. 22.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

Liberal Sen. Jim Munson in a lockdown in Room 257 East Block doing a media interview.

The Hill Times photograph by Denis Drever

NDP MPs, staffers, and others locked down in Room 257 East Block, watching the events unfold on one small laptop.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

NDP MP Wayne Marston, pictured shortly after running from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

More police officers on Metcalfe Street, just down the street from Parliament Hill.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott does a media interview on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

A tourist who witnessed the shooting talks to police shortly after Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

More police officers on Metcalfe Street.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on Sparks Street outside The Hill Times' office.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Police on the Hill shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MPs Rosane Doré Lefebvre, far left, Hélène Laverdiere, and NDP MP Charlie Angus, pictured shortly after the shooting on the Hill and the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Journalists and others leaving Parliament Hill, shortly after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

Reporters on Sparks and Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

The media on Sparks at Metcalfe streets.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

CTV Hill reporter Richard Madan and CBC Radio reporter Susan Lunn.

The Hill Times photograph by Anne Marie Creskey

NDP MP Charlie Angus does an interview on Metcalfe Street later in the afternoon.

The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured that evening, addressing the nation about the shocking killing of a soldier killed at the National War Memorial and later the killing of the man in a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The next day in the Hot Room, the Parliamentary Press Gallery. Gallery clerks Collin Lafrance and Normand Gagnon.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

Flowers the next morning, Oct. 23, at the National War Memorial.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People bring flowers to the War Memorial the day after, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

A woman bringing flowers is escorted by police to the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

People pay their respects at the National War Memorial on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MPs Mark Warawa and Scott Reid return to the Hill the day after the shootings.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Conservative MP James Bezan, parliamentary secretary to the minister of national defence, is interviewed the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

An RCMP officer stands guard on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Police pictured outside the Chateau Laurier Hotel the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Justice Minister Peter MacKay, pictured in the Commons foyer on Oct. 23, taking questions from reporters.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Minister of State for Small Business Maxime Bernier, being scrummed on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Parliamentary Press Gallery clerk Normand Gagnon, pictured on Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

House Sgt.-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, pictured on Oct. 23 in the Speaker's Parade. Mr. Vickers is being credited as the one whose bullets killed gunman Michael Zihaf-Bibeau who stormed the Centre Block with a hunting rifle.

The Hill Times photograph by Mark Burgess

NDP MP Paul Dewar, pictured, and many other MPs, visited the National War Memorial the following day, Oct. 23.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Just outside the Library of Parliament, where Michael Zihaf-Bibeau was finally shot and killed after a gunfight in Centre Block.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Broken glass inside the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

More broken glass in the Centre Block after the gunfight.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

Former Reform Party leader Preston Manning was on Parliament Hill on Oct. 23, the day after the shooting.

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright

The Wire Report reporter Peter Henderson, pictured on Oct. 23, doing an interview with CNN. He had been locking up his bike on Sparks Street on the morning of the shooting at the National War Memorial and was one of the first reporters on the scene.

The Hill Times photograph by Chris Plecash

An Ottawa Police officer gives the thumb's up standing near the National War Memorial, the day after the shootings on Oct. 23.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE