Thursday, April 24, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS I
Harper increasingly emerging as major sovereigntist asset in Quebec today

The door to a Conservative election campaign fought on Quebec's back has been left open.


  
Big car makers can't expect significant numbers to rally to their cause, anymore

There was a time, when GM and Chrysler enjoyed immense sway on the Hill, holding a virtual veto on policies such as the way Canada addresses greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.


  
Layton losing party support to Ignatieff in Quebec...

To make matters worse, NDP Leader Jack Layton has ended up with the political bills of the aborted ceremony.


  
Southern Ontario's rusting manufacturing belt to determine next election's outcome

It's an election that's lining up to be a lot more competitive than last fall's campaign.


  
PM, Prentice, and Ignatieff should all pull their heads out of the tar sands, now

Canada does have a major public relations challenge on its hands. It's called the oil sands.


  
Can Obama give Harper's government a second wind?

The Canada-U.S. front offers the Prime Minister his best chance to focus his second mandate on something other than damage control.


  
PM Harper's tone-deaf Quebec caucus sing from different hymnbooks

There are only 10 Quebec Conservative MPs on Parliament Hill and it is a poorly kept secret that they don't all get along.


  
Harper makes a mistake reducing conversation with Canadians about ongoing economic turmoil

Coinciding with the installation of a brainy official opposition leader, the strategy behind the efforts to showcase Harper as a people's kind of politician versus the presumably elitist Michael Ignatieff has the merit of being transparent.


  
Bitter fruits of Parliamentary crisis still being harvested

Who would have thought that so much disunity could be sowed in so little time?


  
Prime Minister has led Conservative movement to an existential crisis

Federal Liberals are the net winners of an extraordinary showdown that almost cost the Conservatives their minority government.


  
This week's federal budget to be one for the history books

The test of the budget can only rest with the demonstration that Canada will have something constructive to show for its spending once the current downturn comes to an end.


  
Conservative lead in polls why a 2009 federal election seems preordained

The feeling that the 40th Parliament could be history before it has had a real chance to make history runs just as rampant within the government as it does within the ranks of the opposition parties.


  
Tories might want to cross out Quebec from their to-do list

But is Stephen Harper really willing to gamble he'll do better across the rest of the board against Michael Ignatieff than he just did against Stéphane Dion?


  
Liberals run risk of handing Conservatives a majority

Presented with a plan backed by a provincial consensus and judged economically credible, it is hard to see how the opposition parties, and, in particular, the Liberals, could use it as a pretext to plunge Canada into a winter election.


  
Jean's call may also have been the lesser of two evils

By allowing a Prime Minister to shut down the House to duck a confidence vote, Jean has set a precedent that will trouble all those who care about the vigour of Canada's democratic life.


  
Charest victory could change face of federal leadership landscape

If Jean Charest secures a third mandate and a majority, he will be free to ponder a future beyond Quebec politics for the first time since he left the federal arena a decade ago.


  
Charest's election call a source of uneven enthusiasm within his own entourage

Quebec Premier Jean Charest can expect no special help from Prime Minister Stephen Harper.


  
White House arm-twisting of Harper about to go down substantially

There are still more reasons for Prime Minister Stephen Harper to celebrate the changing of the guard at the White House than to mourn it. He can shake the 'Bush' image for one.


  
May has makings of power politician, should join Liberal leadership race

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May's skills would be put to better use on the front rows of the House of Commons than standing on the sidelines inside or outside Parliament.


  
Harper will have to govern within straight jacket of zero-deficit creed

It will be his dubious honour to steer the country through the first period of deep economic turmoil of the new century.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Thursday, April 24, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Former Liberal deputy prime minister Herb Gray dies at age 82: some photos from his life on the Hill April 22, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray, the former Liberal MP, Cabinet minister, and deputy prime minister, pictured here with his daughter Elizabeth Gray-Smith, died on Monday, April 21 at the age of 82. He served in Parliament of 39 years and was one of Canada's longest-serving MPs.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray and his former assistant Eugene Lang, pictured at a Hill reception.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray, pictured on his way to a U.S. Embassy's Fourth of July party in Ottawa. Mr. Gray may have not been in the House in his later years, but he regularly attended Hill-related receptions.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Herb Gray at a menorah-lighting ceremony on the Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured back in his Centre Block office when he was in government.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured in his Centre Block office, being interviewed by Bill Curry, who was a reporter for The Hill Times.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured in his Centre Block office back when he was in government.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on the Hill posing for The Hill Times.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on the Hill back when he was a Cabinet minister.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured on Parliament Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray pictured with his wife, Sharon Sholzberg, on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured in a Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Jim Peterson and Herb Gray, pictured on a rainy day on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Jim Peterson and Herb Gray.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, centre, pictured with the late Liberal MP Shaughnessy Cohen, and Windsor Star Hill reporter Paul McKeague, during a Hill fire drill.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, who went esophagus cancer in 1996 and beat it, is pictured here in a Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured at a Parliamentary Press Gallery Dinner on the Hill.
The Hill Times file photograph by Terry McDonald
Herb Gray, pictured at the Lester B. Pearson Building in Ottawa on his way into a special Cabinet minister back when he was a Cabinet minister.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray, pictured in a Hill scrum. Allan Thompson, left, was a reporter with The Toronto Star, and Paul McKeague, pictured right behind Mr. Gray, was never far behind the MP from Windsor.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray in another Hill scrum.
The Hill Times file photograph
Herb Gray in his Centre Block office back when he was a Cabinet minister. He collected, framed, and hung up most of the editorial cartoons of himself in his Centre Block office.
The Hill Times file photo
Herb Gray and his many framed cartoons.
The Hill Times photograph by Kate Malloy
Herb Gray and his editorial cartoons, pictured in his Centre Block office.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE