Thursday, April 17, 2014
START A FREE TRIAL | SUBSCRIBE | LOG IN
Sign up for the free daily email

INSIDE POLITICS I
While Britain negotiates, Canada's federal parties put a gun to each other's heads in hung Parliaments

If minority government is going to be the new normal in Canada, bringing voters into the loop of the available alternatives before they cast their ballot might actually make a lot of sense.


  
A year after Ignatieff's coronation, Liberal party is more than ever without a road map

The perplexing Liberal approach to the issue of the Governor General is only the latest in a string of questionable moves.


  
Tenuous line between private and public lives of federal politicians obliterated

In past Parliaments, airing the bed sheets of a Cabinet minister to score a media hit would have been left to a second-tier opposition rat pack and not, as in this instance, undertaken daily by one or more party leaders.


  
Afghan detainee issue only piece of larger problematic puzzle for Harper

There's a disturbing pattern of a government that would rather blindfold its critics and keep Canadians guessing as to its actions than be accountable for them.


  
House Speaker's decision on Afghan documents to test Parliament's wil

PM Stephen Harper would not be Prime Minister if he was not adept at playing all the angles to his advantage and the latest Parliamentary test of wills has the potential makings of a Conservative electoral opportunity.


  
Environment major area where voters part ways with Conservative government

Indeed, a case can be made that a persistent Conservative blind spot to the environment has done more to lead the party to a minority dead end in Quebec and elsewhere than clumsy marketing


  
You call that recalibration?

A week after the return of Parliament, the Conservatives and the Liberals remain more or less deadlocked in voting intentions, with the NDP and the Bloc Québécois in a holding pattern.


  
Harper's running on a public opinion treadmill

Like a plant whose buds fail to open, his government is consistently failing to thrive in the polls. It could be that the Conservative party was uprooted from opposition too quickly for its own good.


  
Duceppe scrambles to avoid head-on collision with Bouchard

It is too early to tell whether Lucien Bouchard's public tiff with the PQ is just a one-off from a bored political retiree or the embryo of a game-changer for Quebec politics.


  
Conservative elected Senate promise a poison pill for Parliamentary democracy

With a Senate opposition majority bolstered by electoral victories, the risks of legislative gridlock between the two Houses of Parliament would be increased rather than the opposite.


  
Politicians have been making promises on child care for more than a quarter century

Watching Michael Ignatieff these days is like watching a movie rerun, in the dubious expectation of a different ending.


  
Cabinet shuffle did not justify closing

With the main players at Finance, Environment, Foreign Affairs and Defence, all staying put, the ripple effect of the makeover will be localized rather than widespread


  
Life's gone out of federal politics in Quebec

The result is an environment that is almost completely devoid of passion about and faith in the conventional political process.


  
For the first time, serious ministerial damage extends deep inside first tier of Harper's Cabinet

At the same time, the bills the government ran up to deal with the recession are about to come in.


  
Government losing credibility battle on Afghan detainees

While the current Prime Minister has a well-deserved reputation for pushing back aggressively when under attack, Stephen Harper has—in this—been empowered by a weak-kneed Liberal opposition.


  
Afghan torture probe about to run on empty

To all intents and purposes, an opposition-controlled Parliamentary investigation has been successfully hijacked by the government's spin doctors.


  
Hard to believe Harper, ministers left out of loop on Afghan file

Richard Colvin, among others, was supposed to be their eyes and ears in Afghanistan.


  
Federal Conservative party is no longer radioactive in Quebec

That's the main message from last week's byelection foursome. As a result, it is no longer a given that Quebecers will again stand in the way of a Conservative majority in the next general election.


  
Unanimous House motion on Quebec immigrants does not change substance of debate

But in the future, the competing aspirations of Quebec francophones are more likely to erode the consensus that underlies Bill 101 than the House of Commons or even the Supreme Court.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Friday, April 25, 2014
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
ITK's 'A Taste of the Arctic' shindig on April 7, Ottawa, photographs by Cynthia Münster April 14, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
A happy crowd at ITK's 'Taste of Arctic' at the NAC gathers for a picture. The annual event, held in Ottawa by the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, is meant showcase Inuit culture. Some 350 attend the party, including a number of MPs, Senators, Cabinet minister, lobbyists and journalists.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
National Inuit Leader and ITK President Terry Audla shows off his seal vest to Employment Minister Jason Kenney.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Environics' Meredith Taylor and Greg MacEachern with ITK's Stephen Hendrie.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Justice Minister Peter MacKay, his son Kian, and ITK president Terry Audla.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
ITK president Terry Audla and Abbas Rana, assistant deputy editor at The Hill Times and Party Central columnist.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Labour Minister Kellie Leitch, ITK President Terry Audla, Laureen Harper, and local Ottawa photographer Michelle Valberg.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
ITK President Terry Audla and Labour Minister Kellie Leitch.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
A platter of smoked fish.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Conservative MP Colin Carrie.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Seal hash martinis.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
NDP MP Dennis Bevington, who represents the Western Arctic, N.W.T., and Chris Farris.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
ITK President and National Inuit Leader Terry Audla.
The Hill Times photograph by Cynthia Münster
Beatrice Dear entertains the crowd.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE