Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014
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INSIDE POLITICS I
Pipeline politics at top of North American agenda for next two years

There could be a day when both the Keystone XL and the Northern Gateway pipelines are built, but not before some political careers are badly bruised, if not killed.


  
Big week for tinfoil hat crowd in Ottawa

But it turns out that while the legions of Harper opponents were waiting for the hard-right social agenda to be firmly planted in Ottawa, the Conservatives are actually exporting those policies.


  
Political players to watch in 2012

The least known factor on the 2012 political watch list is also the one with the most potential to alter the Canadian landscape.


  
Liberals’ choice of president of an historic party at crossroads crucial

The choice Liberals make at their Ottawa convention will go a very long way in determining whether this party can reinvent itself or whether it withers and dies after 2015.


  
Beauty of Copps: she’s loved, despised, and often for same reasons

But for a party on life support, is Sheila Copps, a lightning rod for controversy, a woman who has roller-derby-style politics in her DNA, a figure as polarizing as any in an often polarized party, really the party president to dig Liberals out of their hole?


  
Conservative strategy for its Quebec revival: spread false rumours about imminent retirement of Liberal MP. Check.

If you can’t win it, try to steal it by spreading lies, sowing confusion, destabilizing the rightful winner and wallowing in the slime.


  
NDP leadership campaign more about race for endorsements than a battle of ideas

The NDP leadership campaign is so far not promising to freshen up Canada’s progressive discourse, but it could be the best venue to measure the chilling effect of the bare-knuckled Conservative approach to politics on the country’s political conversation.


  
Tories call Leslie and Gravelle traitorous duo for telling Washington that not every Canadian was a proponent of Alberta’s tar sands

To hear the noise from the Conservative side of the House of Commons, one would think that the Halifax NDP MP and her colleague from Nickel Belt, Claude Gravelle, were treasonous subversives who should be drawn and quartered at dawn.


  
PIPSC to take on feds with brains, not brawn, Corbett says

These will be tumultuous times because it is not only austerity that is driving this government in its war with labour. It is being driven by ideology and plain old politics.


  
Ferguson served up as an anglo piñata to francophone New Democrats

Michael Ferguson has toiled diligently in the service of the New Brunswick government and is now on the brink of becoming Canada’s new auditor general. But he should never get the job.


  
Harper’s not pulling unfamiliar rabbits out of new majority hat

The government’s penchant for using its reinforced Parliamentary arsenal to curtail debate has been par for the course for a governing party that routinely closed down Parliament in the face of political adversity in its minority days.


  
Votes that don’t promise change don’t create excitement

This year has been remarkable for the number of federal, provincial and territorial elections, but it will also be recorded as the year of the status quo.


  
Harper majority tightens iron grip on opposition parties too

It’s the opposition parties’ turn to see their already shortened Parliamentary wings clipped by Harper’s majority.


  
Mulcair now underdog in early NDP leadership sweepstakes, no accident

Among the prospective candidates, none worked more closely with Layton than Topp. He was at the late leader’s side until the very end.


  
Maybe it’s time we got to know Megan Leslie

So it is hard to imagine the federal NDP heading into its second consecutive leadership race without a serious female leadership candidate; not one freighted with symbolism, but one who carries a realistic chance to win.


  
Clement's earned a reputation for defending the indefensible

It won't serve him well as Treasury Board president. In that pivotal capacity, he will be in charge of tightening the belt of the federal government, and doing so under the wary surveillance of a suspicious chattering class.


  
Post-referendum tinderbox has turned into a pile of damp hay

Quebec is re-engaging on the national scene on terms that closely mirror the constitutional accord whose failure sparked its two-decade estrangement.


  
If Ontario was serious, it would draft constitutional amendment to abolish Senate

Under the Constitution, the power to initiate a discussion to reform Canada's parliamentary institutions does not rest exclusively with the federal government.


  
Conservatives put national media in their crosshairs

There's an emerging narrative designed to place the Parliamentary media squarely in the Conservative crosshairs recently vacated by Michael Ignatieff's Liberals.


  
This Parliamenet has a sunnier disposition than previous one

It's a mood enhanced by the fact that for the first time in two decades, the priority of the vast majority of Quebec's MPs is not to demonstrate that Canada is a failed federation.


  

Parliamentary Calendar
Wednesday, December 31, 1969
HILL LIFE & PEOPLE SLIDESHOWS
Chantal Hébert's Morning After book launch at Métropolitain Brasserie in Ottawa: Sept. 24 Sept. 30, 2014

The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser, a former Toronto Star Hill journalist, and Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, a former Conservative and Reform Party staffer.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert, national affairs columnist for The Toronto Star and author of The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was. Ms. Hébert launched her book on Sept. 24 in Ottawa at the Métropolitain Brasserie where plenty of political players turned up from the Hill.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jean-Pierre Kingsley, Canada's former chief electoral officer, and Quebec Liberal Senator Dennis Dawson.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson, a partner at i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising, who hosted the book launch. Mr. Anderson is a panellist on CBC's At Issue along with Ms. Hébert and Andrew Coyne.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Kate Purchase, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Quebec Liberal Sen. Dennis Dawson, Jim Patrick of Shaw Communications, and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Official Languages Commissioner Graham Fraser and Bruce Anderson of i2 Ideas & Issues Advertising.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Patrick Kennedy, director of government relations for CF Industries, flips through a copy of Chantal Hébert's book, The Morning After: The 1995 Quebec Referendum and The Day That Almost Was.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Jim Armour, vice-president at Summa Strategies, is the happy new owner of The Morning After.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Chantal Hébert and former Conservative MP Ted Menzies.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Journalist Daniel L'Heureux, Mylène Dupere, communications director for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, and Jean Lapierre, who helped Ms. Hébert write the book. Mr. Lapierre is also a former Bloc Québécois MP who later joined Paul Martin's Liberals and was a federal Cabinet minister. Today, he's a pundit.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Leslie Swartman, director of public affairs at MDA Information Systems, and former Liberal Cabinet minister Jean Lapierre. Ms. Swartman used to work for Mr. Lapierre when he was in the Paul Martin Cabinet.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Anne Marie Creskey, publisher of The Hill Times, and Hill Times reporter Rachel Aiello.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Former Conservative MP Ted Menzies and Global TV's Tom Clark.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Bruce Anderson and Chantal Hébert.
The Hill Times photograph by Jake Wright
Michel Liboiron, director of government relations at CIBC, and Postmedia News reporter and columnist Stephen Maher.

MICHAEL DE ADDER'S TAKE